Padmakunda, aka: Padmakuṇḍa, Padma-kunda; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Padmakunda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Padmakunda in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Padmakuṇḍa (पद्मकुण्ड) refers to one of the six kinds of kuṇḍa (fire-pit) mentioned in the Tattvacintāmaṇi (7.1-13).

Source: Shodhganga: Mantra-sādhana: Chapter One of the Kakṣapuṭatantra
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Padmakunda in Pancaratra glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Padmakuṇḍa (पद्मकुण्ड) refers to one of the various kuṇḍas “fire-pit” described in the twenty-fifth chapter of the Īśvarasaṃhitā, dealing with the classification of the places for building the fire-pits. The Kuṇḍa (eg., Padmakuṇḍa) is used for cooking and offering oblations to the sacred fire.

Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 5
Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 653 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Padma
Padma (पद्म).—(paduma) , m. or nt., (1) n. of a kind of brahmanical sacrifice: Mv ii.237.20 (pr...
Kunda
Kuṇḍa (कुण्ड).—m. (-ṇḍaḥ) A son born in adultery, the son of a woman by another man than her hu...
Padmasana
Padmāsana (पद्मासन).—n. (-naṃ) A posture in religious meditation, sitting with the thighs cross...
Mahapadma
Mahāpadma (महापद्म).—m. (compare Padma 5), n. of a cold hell: Mvy 4936; Dharmas 122; Divy 67.23...
Padmanabha
Padmanābha (पद्मनाभ) is the name of an ancient king from Viśālā, according to the twenty-first ...
Padmaraga
Padmarāga (पद्मराग).—m. (-gaḥ) A ruby. E. padma a lotus, and rāga colour.
Padmabandha
Padmabandha (पद्मबन्ध).—m. (-ndhaḥ) The artificial arrangement of the words of a verse in a fig...
Padmahasta
Padmahasta (पद्महस्त).—n. of a Bodhisattva: ŚsP 42.14.
Agnikunda
Agni-kuṇḍa.—(CII 4), fire-pit; an emblem of the worship of the Fire or Sun. Note: agni-kuṇḍa is...
Padmasambhava
Padmasaṃbhava (पद्मसंभव).—epithets of Brahman, the lotus-born god. Derivable forms: padmasaṃbha...
Padmakara
Padmakara (पद्मकर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. The sun. 2. An epithet of Vishnu. E. padma, and kara hand, his...
Padmata
Padmāṭa (पद्माट).—m. (-ṭaḥ) A sort of Cassia, (C. tora.) E. paḍma a lotus, and aṭ to resemble, ...
Padmagarbha
Padmagarbha (पद्मगर्भ).—m. (-rbhaḥ) 1. A name of Bramha. 2. The sun. 3. An epithet of Vishnu. E...
Homakunda
Homakuṇḍa (होमकुण्ड).—The pit for making offerings during yajñas. Rules about making the pit ar...
Amritakunda
Amṛtakuṇḍa (अमृतकुण्ड).—m. (-ṇḍaḥ) A vessel of nectar. E. amṛta and kuṇḍa a hole.

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