Mahitala, Mahītala, Mahi-tala: 9 definitions

Introduction

Mahitala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Mahītala (महीतल) refers to the “surface of the earth” and is mentioned in verse 3.6 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] the southern course (of the sun comprises) the seasons monsoon, etc. and (is named) ‘liberation’ as it liberates strength (in man) ; for the moon (is) strong then because of its being soma-like, (while) the sun declines, the surface of the earth [viz., mahītala] showing heat tempered by cool clouds, rains, and winds”.

Note: Śāntatāpa (“showing tempered heat”) has been interchanged with mahītala (“surface of the earth”) and resolved into thsa-ba źi-ba (“tempered in its heat”) The locative absolute, which still belongs to what precedes, has been rendered by a temporal clause and joined to the next sentence so as to keep the original word-order intact.—The spelling sa-steṅs (CD) is rare though not unique; it recurs, for example, in Bodh. 5 36 (D) and in Mahāvyutpatti 3423.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (M) next»] — Mahitala in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mahītala : (nt.) the surface of the earth.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Mahītala refers to: the ground (of the earth) Mhvs 5, 54.

Note: mahītala is a Pali compound consisting of the words mahī and tala.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mahitala (महितल).—n (S) The name of a division of the infernal regions.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahītala (महीतल).—surface of the earth.

Derivable forms: mahītalam (महीतलम्).

Mahītala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahī and tala (तल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahītala (महीतल).—n.

(-laṃ) The surface of the earth. E. mahī and tala below.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahītala (महीतल).—m. or n. the earth, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 52, 36.

Mahītala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahī and tala (तल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahītala (महीतल).—[neuter] surface of the earth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahītala (महीतल):—[=mahī-tala] [from mahī > mah] n. the surface of the earth, ground, soil, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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