Kilaka, Kīlaka: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Kilaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Kilak.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

One of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-four combined Hands).—Kīlaka (bond): the little fingers of the Mṛga-śīrṣa hand areinterlocked. Usage: affection, the conversation of lovers.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Purāṇas

Kīlaka (कीलक) refers to a “chanting of a mantra” to serve as a pin of protection. It is used throughout vedic and purāṇic literature.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

1) Kīlaka (कीलक) refers to a “spike” and represents a type of ketu, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The dark spots [i.e., tāmasa-kīlaka], also known as ketus, the sons of Rāhu are Tāmasa, Kīlaka and the like, and are 33 in number. How they affect the earth depends upon their color, position and shape. If these spots should appear on the solar disc, mankind will suffer miseries; if on the lunar disc mankind will be happy; but if they take the shape of a crow, a headless human body, or a weapon, mankind will suffer even though the spots should appear on the moon”.

2) Kīlaka (कीलक) refers to the forty-second of the sixty-year cycle of Jupiter, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 8).—Accordingly, “The first year of the ninth yuga is Plavaṅga, the next year is known as Kīlaka, the third is known as Saumya and the last two years are known as Sādhāraṇa and Rodhakṛt respectively; of these, during the years Kīlaka and Saumya mankind will be happy. In the year Plavaṅga mankind will suffer much; in Sādhāraṇa there will be slight rain and crops will suffer; in the fifth year there will be a variety of rainfall and crops will thrive”.

3) Kīlaka (कीलक) or Kīlakaketu refers to certain types of Ketus (i.e., luminous bodies such as comets and meteors), according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 11).—Accordingly, “The comets which are of the colour of blood or fire and with three tails are named Kauṅkuma Ketus: they are the sons of Mars and are 60 in number; they appear in the north and when they appear mankind will feel miserable. The Ketus that appear as spots in the solar and lunar discs are 33 in number [i.e., triṃśati]. They are named as Tāmasa and Kīlaka Ketus. They are the sons of Rāhu. Their effects have been stated in the chapter on the Sun (cf. verse 7.3)”.

Source: The effect of Samvatsaras: Satvargas

Kīlaka (कीलक) refers to the forty-second saṃvatsara (“jovian year)” in Vedic astrology.—The native who is born in ‘samvatsara’ of ‘kilaka’ is of medium or average handsomeness (that is, he is neither very much beautiful nor very much ugly), is sweet-spoken, kind hearted, has love for water, has very fat legs, beautiful forehead, is strong and destroyer of his enemies.

According with Jataka Parijata, the person born in the year kilaka (2028-2029 AD) will devote himself to divine worship and will be exceedingly fortunate and valiant.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Arcana-dipika - 3rd Edition

Kīlaka (कीलक) is the forty-second of sixty years (saṃvatsara) in the Vedic lunar calendar according to the Arcana-dīpikā by Vāmana Mahārāja (cf. Appendix).—Accordingl, There are sixty different names for each year in the Vedic lunar calendar, which begins on the new moon day (Amāvasyā) after the appearance day of Śrī Caitanya Mahāprabhu (Gaura-pūrṇimā), in February or March. The Vedic year [viz., Kīlaka], therefore, does not correspond exactly with the Christian solar calendar year.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Kīlaka (कीलक) refers to a “stake” and represents one of the items held in the left hand of Heruka: one of the main deities of the Herukamaṇḍala described in the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Heruka is positioned in the Lotus (padma) at the center; He is the origin of all heroes; He has 17 faces (with three eyes on each) and 76 arms [holding, for example, kīlaka]; He is half black and half green in color; He is dancing on a flaming sun placed on Bhairava and Kālarātrī.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 8: Bondage of karmas

Kīlaka (कीलक) refers to “very weak joint” and represents one of the six types of Saṃhanana (bone-joint karma), representing one of the various kinds of Nāma, or “physique-making (karmas)”, which represents one of the eight types of Prakṛti-bandha (species bondage): one of the four kinds of bondage (bandha) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra chapter 8. What is meant by very weak joint (kīlaka) body-making (nāma) karma? The karmas rise of which cause bone-joints without nails only (loose joints) are called very weak joint body-making karma.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kīlaka.—(EI 23), a peg [for marking boundaries]. Note: kīlaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kīlaka (कीलक).—m n S The pin of a ghiraṭa or jātēṃ (handmill). 2 A pin, bolt, peg, nail, spike gen.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kīlaka (कीलक).—

1) A wedge or pin.

2) A fence.

3) A pillar, column; see कील (kīla).

-kam Name of the inner syllables of a mantra. सोऽहमिति कीलकम् (so'hamiti kīlakam) Haṃsa Up.2.

Derivable forms: kīlakaḥ (कीलकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kīlaka (कीलक).—m.

(-kaḥ) A piller for cows, &c. to rub themselves against, or one to which they are tied. 2. A pin, a bolt, a wedge. E. kan added to the preceding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kīlaka (कीलक).—[kīla + ka], m. A wedge, [Pañcatantra] 10, 7.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kīlaka (कीलक).—[masculine] kīliṃkā [feminine] a pointed piece of wood; peg, bolt, wedge, etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Kīlaka (कीलक) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—[tantric] Rādh. 25.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kīlaka (कीलक):—[from kīl] m. a pin, bolt, wedge, [Pañcatantra; Hitopadeśa]

2) [v.s. ...] a splint (for confining a broken bone), [Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] a kind of tumour (having the form of a pin), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] (= śivaka) a kind of pillar for cows etc. to rub themselves against, or one to which they are tied, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of the forty-second year of the sixty years' cycle of Jupiter, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

6) [v.s. ...] m. [plural] Name of certain Ketus, [ib.]

7) [from kīl] n. Name of the inner syllables of a Mantra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kīlaka (कीलक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. A pillar for cows.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kilaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Kilaka (किलक) [Also spelled kilak]:—(nf) a joyful outcry.

2) Kīlaka (कीलक) [Also spelled kilak]:—(nm) a pivot; rivet; cuneus.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kīlaka (ಕೀಲಕ):—

1) [noun] = ಕೀಲ [kila]2 -1,4,5,7, & 8.

2) [noun] a hand tool consisting of a solid head set crosswise on a handle and used for pounding; a hammer.

3) [noun] a post to which cattle are tied.

4) [noun] forty-second year in the cycle of sixty years.

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Kīḷaka (ಕೀಳಕ):—

1) [noun] a piece of solid material (as wood or metal) used especially for fastening separate articles together; a pin.

2) [noun] name of a mountain; Kīlaka.

3) [noun] a resinous substance secreted by a scale insect (Laccifer lacca) and used chiefly in the form of shellac; lac.

4) [noun] flame.

5) [noun] a clever way of doing something which is hard to analyse or teach; knack.

6) [noun] a hand tool consisting of a solid head set crosswise on a handle and used for pounding; a hammer.

7) [noun] a post to which cattle are tied.

8) [noun] forty second year in the cycle of sixty years.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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