Jita, aka: Jitā; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jita means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

1a) Jita (जित).—One of the five sons of Yadu.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 94. 2.

1b) A sage of the XII epoch of Manu.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 2. 44.

1c) The Jayadevas of the Svāyambhuva epoch;1 sons of Brahmā.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 3. 8; Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 8.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 31. 4.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Jita (जित, “subdued”) refers to one of the sixteen words that together make up the elā musical composition (prabandha), according to the Saṅgītaśiromaṇi 67-84. Elā is an important subgenre of song and was regarded as an auspicious and important prabandha (composition) in ancient Indian music (gāndharva). According to nirukta analysis, the etymological meaning of elā can be explained as follows: a represents Viṣṇu, i represents Kāmadeva, la represents Lakṣmī.

Jita is one of the sixteen words of elā and has a presiding deity named sumukhī (the fair-faced one) defined in the Saṅgītaśiromaṇi (“crest-jewel of music”), which is a 15th-century Sanskrit work on Indian musicology (gāndharvaśāstra).

Source: Wisdom Library: Saṅgītaśiromaṇi
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

One of the palaces occupied by Narada Buddha before his Renunciation. Bu x.19.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geogprahy

Jita or Jīta.—(EI 28, 29), income or wages; revenue income; derived from Sanskrit jīvita in the same sense. Note: jita is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

jita : (pp. of jināti) conquered; subdued; (nt.), victory.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Jita, (pp. of jayati, conquer) conquered, subdued, mastered: (nt.) victory. jitā me pāpakā dhammā Vin. I, 8; ‹-› Dh. 40, 104 (attā jitaṃ seyyo for attā jito seyyo see DhA. II, 228), 105, 179; Vv 6427 (jitindriya one whose senses are mastered, cp. guttindriya).—Cp. vi°. (Page 284)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

jita (जित).—p (S) Conquered or overcome: excelled or surpassed: gained or won. Used elegantly in comp. as jitakāma, jitakrōdha, jitalōbha, jitamōha In whom lust, anger &c. is subdued; jitaprāṇa Who can retain his breath a long time; jitamanaska Possessing self-command; jitadravya Who has acquired spoils or treasure; jitapaṇa Who has gained the wager or stake. Affixed it forms an opposite class of compounds; as kāmajita, krōdhajita strījita That is under the dominion of lust, anger, woman. This is one of the many Sanskrit words of which the usefulness will be readily discovered by translators from English.

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jitā (जिता).—a ( H) Alive. Pr jityā rōṭī mēkhyā mātī Give me bread whilst I live, earth when I die. Pr. jityācī khōḍa mēlyāsivāī jāta nāhīṃ. 2 fig. Not extinguished or gone out--fire: not reduced to ashes, yet burning;--a coal, a brand, embers: running, quick, not stagnant--water: proceeding from a steady spring (not from the moisture following upon the rains)--water: active, not killed--quicksilver; extant, current, in force or use--a language, writing, custom: in existence, forthcoming, not lost--an article: good, not dead, payable--a debt. 3 Living, emphatically and revilingly. See the terms jitāpiśāca, jitāsambandha &c. 4 Cut whilst green and succulent--riceplants, grass. jitā kīṃ mēlā Still as a mouse! (i. e. let it not be known whether you are alive or dead). Ex. cippa jitā kīṃ mēlā baisa. jityāpanthāsa lāgaṇēṃ To begin to recover from some dangerous sickness.

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jīta (जीत).—f unc (jita S) Victory: also winning or gaining (at play, betting &c.)

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jīta (जीत).—a For jitā and used in all its senses, but less commonly. Ex. jīta nyāvēṃ rāyāpāsiṃ ||. jīta nā mēlā Living or dead. Pr. jīta nā mēlī haraḷī- cī muḷī Used of an estate, a property, or a business which, whether flourishing or declining, brisk or slack, always yields something. See fully under haraḷīcī muḷī. 2 See jitā kīṃ mēlā under jitā. jīta hāḍāṃlā khiḷaṇēṃ To cleave fast to one all through his lifetime.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jita (जित).—p Overcome, conquered; excelled; won.

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jitā (जिता).—a Alive Fig. Not extinguished or gone out-fire; not reduced to ash- es, yet burning-a coal, embers; run- ning, quick, not stagnant-water; extant, current, in force or use-a language, writing, custom. jitā kīṃ mēlā Still as a mouse! Ex. cippa jittā kīṃ mēlā baisa (i. e. let it not be known whe- ther you are alive or dead). jityā panthāsa lāgaṇēṃ Begin to recover from some dangerous sickness.

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jīta (जीत).—f Victory; also winning or gaining (at play, betting.) a See jitā.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jita (जित).—p. p. [ji-karmaṇi kta]

1) Conquered, subdued, curbed, restrained, (as enemies, passions &c.).

2) Won, got, obtained (by conquest).

3) Surpassed, excelled.

4) Subject to, enslaved or influenced by; कामजित (kāmajita); स्त्रीजित (strījita) &c.

-tam Victory.

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Jīta (जीत).—a.

1) Oppressed, overpowered.

2) Become old; also जीन (jīna).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 50 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Parajita
Parājita (पराजित).—p. p.1) Conquered, subjugated, defeated.2) Condemned by law, cast or defeate...
Jitashatru
Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु).—a. victorious. Jitaśatru is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms j...
Jitendriya
Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय).—a. one who has conquered his passions or subdued the senses (rūpa, ra...
Strijita
Strījita (स्त्रीजित).—a hen-pecked husband; स्त्रीजितस्पर्शमात्रेण सर्व पुण्यं विनश्यति (strīji...
Jitari
Jitāri (जितारि).—Son of Avīkṣit born of the family of Pūru. Avīkṣit was the son of King Kuru. M...
Jita Ata
Jita, (pp. of jayati, conquer) conquered, subdued, mastered: (nt.) victory. jitā me pāpakā dham...
Jita Pishaca
jitā piśāca (जिता पिशाच).—m jitā sambandha m jitī avadasā f See jīvanta piśāca &c.
Jitahava
Jitāhava (जिताहव).—a. victorious. Jitāhava is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jita ...
Jitaloka
Jitaloka (जितलोक).—a. 'one who has won heaven' (epithet of a class of manes). Jitaloka is a San...
Jitanemi
Jitanemi (जितनेमि).—a staff made of the Aśvattha tree. Derivable forms: jitanemiḥ (जितनेमिः).Ji...
Hrijita
Hrījita (ह्रीजित).—a. overcome or confounded by shame; ह्रीमूढानां भवति विफलप्रेरणा चूर्णमुष्टि...
Bharyajita
Bhāryājita (भार्याजित).—1) a hen-pecked husband. 2) a kind of deer. Derivable forms: bhāryājita...
Jitakshara
Jitākṣara (जिताक्षर).—a. reading well or readily. Jitākṣara is a Sanskrit compound consisting o...
Jitakashin
Jitakāśin (जितकाशिन्).—a. appearing victorious, proud of victory, assuming the airs of a victor...
Jitamitra
Jitāmitra (जितामित्र).—a. one who has conquered his foes, triumphant, victorious. 2) one who ha...

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