Jiva, aka: Jīva, Jīvā; 18 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jiva means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

1a) Jīva (जीव).—Is Guru planet.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 93. 10 and 16; Vāyu-purāṇa 111. 5.

1b) The vital prāṇa; Lord lives in every creature like the ākāśa, all-pervading in respective pots.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 102. 101.

1c) Four classes born of sveda, aṇḍa, udbhija and jarāyu; and Jīvātma subject to Iśvara is one view.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 1. 31; 3. 28.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Yoga (school of philosophy)

In the texts of haṭhayoga, the Jīva (जीव) is the vital principle, entering the foetus at the moment of conception, and leaving with the body’s final exhalation. It moves about the body, propelled by the breath, unless restrained by means of prāṇāyāma. Ballāla glosses Jīva with prāṇa which seems to be an oversimplification: describes the ten vāyus as flowing through the nāḍīs while “having the form of the Jīva” (jīvarūpinaḥ).

(Source): Google Books: The Khecarividya of Adinatha
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Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Jīva (जीव, “individual”).—In the Paramātma-sandarbha the jīva or individual is described as an entity which in its own nature is pure and beyond māyā, but which perceives all the mental states produced by māyā and is affected by them. It is called kṣetrajña, because it perceives itself to be associated with its internal and external body (kṣetra). The jīvas are described as atomic in size; they are infinite in number and are but the parts of God.

(Source): archive.org: A History of Indian Philosophy (vaishnavism)
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Jīvā (जीवा).—1. Sine or Chord; (lit. bowstring.) 2. R sine. Note: Jīvā is a Sanskrit technical term used in ancient Indian sciences such as Astronomy, Mathematics and Geometry.

(Source): Wikibooks (hi): Sanskrit Technical Terms
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Jyotiṣa (ज्योतिष, jyotisha or jyotish) basically refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents one of the six additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas. Jyotiṣa concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

General definition (in Hinduism)

In Hinduism and Jainism, a jiva is a living being, or more specifically, the immortal essence or soul of a living organism (human, animal, fish or plant etc.) which survives physical death. It has a very similar usage to atma, but whereas atma refers to "the cosmic self", jiva is used to denote an individual 'living entity' or 'living being' specifically. To avoid confusion, the terms Paramatma and jivatma (also commonly spelled jeevatma) are used.

The word itself originates from the Sanskrit Jivás, with the root jīv- 'to breathe'. It has the same Indo-European root as the Latin word Vivus: "alive".

In the Bhagavad Gita, the jiva is described as immutable, eternal, numberless and indestructible. It is said not to be a product of the material world (Prakrti), but of a higher 'spiritual' nature. At the point of physical death the jiva takes a new physical body depending on the karma and the individual desires and necessities of the particular jiva in question.

Aniruddha defines the Jiva, the empirical self, as the self determined by the body, the external sense-organs, mind, intellect, and egoism; the self which is devoid of empirical cognition, merit, demerit, and other mental modes is the transcendental Atman. When the Jiva breaks the shackles of Prakrti it becomes the transcendental self. Isvara and the jivas are both empirical realities; the former is the ruler and the impeller, and the latter are the ruled, the ones who are impelled.

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Daughter of Ubbiri and the king of Kosala. When she died, it was her death which made Ubbiri attain to arahantship. v.l. Jivanti. Thig.vs.51; ThigA.53f.

(Source): Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

life, vital principle, individual soul. 'Soul (life) and body are identical' and 'Soul and body are different', these two frequently quoted wrong views fall under the 2 kinds of personality-belief (sakkāya-ditthi; s. ditthi), i.e. the first one under the annihilation-belief (uccheda-ditthi) and the second under the eternity-belief (sassata-ditthi).

"Verily, if one holds the view that the soul (life) is identical with the body, in that case a holy life is not possible; or if one holds the view that the soul (life) is something quite different, also in that case a holy life is impossible. Both these extremes the Perfect One has avoided and shown the Middle Doctrine, which says: 'On ignorance depend the karma-formations, on the karma-formations depends consciousness', etc." (S. XII. 35).

(Source): Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Souls; Embodied Soul;

What is the size (extent) of each soul?

From the spatial units (pradeshas) covering point of view, each individual soul has innumerable units of space equal to universe, but by virtue of the quality of contraction and expansion it retains the shape and size of the body it occupies and the emancipated soul has its size equal to the last body it occupied.

Which soul becomes equal to the universe?

Just before attaining emancipation the soul which undergoes 'kevali samudghat' becomes equal to the universe.

(Source): Atma Dharma: Principles of Jainism

Jīva (living beings with consciousness):—There are infinite Jīvas in this cosmos. Each Jīva has the potential to attain Jina status through his strenuous spiritual purification efforts. However all living beings help (cooperate) with each other. Further Jīvas are broadly divided as pure soul (siddha) and empirical souls (defiled souls or saṃsārī-jīva). Empirical souls go through innumerable varieties of existences grouped in four categories namely hell, heaven, human and sub-human.

(Source): Jain eLibrary: 7th International Summer School for Jain Studies

Jīva (जीव, “soul”).—What is meant by jīva (living being)? An entity which has consciousness (cetanā) is called jīva.

(Source): Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 1

Jīva (जीव).—How many categories of sentients/ soul / jīva / ātma are there? There are two main categories of soul, namely: empirical (saṃsārī) and pure or liberated (mukta). (see Tattvārthasūtra 2.10)

(Source): Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 2: the Category of the living

Jīva (जीव) refers to a “living being” according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 8.2.—Who is a living being (jīva)? An entity which has six to ten life forces /vitalities and has life is called a living being. Another definition of a living being is one who is endowed with knowledge and perception. How do we establish the existence of karmas with the empirical soul? There are infinite living beings (jīva) in this universe. Each has different level of the manifestation of consciousness as knowledge and intuition. Also the discrimination amongst them as rich or poor, happy and unhappy etc all prove the existence of karmas with the soul. Even though jīva is a being of independent nature, still it is transmigrating in this universe. Why? This transmigration is due to its bondage with karmas.

(Source): Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 8: Bondage of karmas
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

India history and geogprahy

Jiva (“life”) is one of the gotras (clans) among the Kurnis (a tribe of South India). Kurni is, according to the Census Report 1901, “a corruption of kuri (sheep) and vanni (wool), the caste having been originally weavers of wool”. The gotras (viz., Jiva) are described as being of the Brāhman, Kshatriya, and Vaisya sub-divisions of the caste, and of Shanmukha’s Sudra caste.

(Source): Project Gutenberg: Castes and Tribes of Southern India, Volume 1
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

jīva : (m.) the life.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

1) Jīva, 2 (nt.) the note of the jīvaka bird Sum. V. on D. III, 201. (Page 285)

2) Jīva, 1 (adj. -n.) (Sk. jīva, Idg. *gǔīǔos=Gr. bi/oQ, Lat. vīvus, Goth. quius, Ohg. queck, E. quick, Lith. gyvas) 1. the soul. Sabbe jīvā all the souls, enumd with sattā pāṇā bhūta in the dialect used by the followers of Gosāla D. I, 53 (=DA. I, 161 jīvasaññī). “taṃ jīvaṃ taṃ sarīraṃ udāhu aññaṃ j. aññaṃ s. ” (is the body the soul, or is the body one thing and the soul another?) see D. I, 157, 188; II, 333, 336, 339; S. IV, 392 sq.; M. I, 157, 426 sq.; A. II, 41.—Also in this sense at Miln. 30, 54, 86.—Vin. IV, 34; S. III, 215, 258 sq.; IV, 286; V, 418; A. V, 31, 186, 193.—2. life, in yāvajīvaṃ as long as life lasts, for life, during (his) lifetime D. III, 133; Vin. I, 201; Dh. 64; J. II, 155; PvA. 76.

—gāhaṃ (adv.) taken alive, in phrase j. ° gaṇhāti or gaṇhāpeti S. I, 84; J. I, 180; II, 404; cp. karamara; —loka the animate creation J. III, 394; —sūla “life-pale, ” a stake for execution J. II, 443; —sokin (=sokajīvin) leading a life of sorrow J. VI, 509. (Page 284)

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Marathi-English dictionary

jivā (जिवा).—a R From jīva but used throughout as jitā.

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jīva (जीव).—m (S) Life. 2 A living being, an animate creature. Ex. sarva jivāṃsa īśvara pōsitō. S adage jīvō jīvasya jīvanaṃ Life is the support of life. 3 A small insect or creature, e. g. a mite, maggot, weevil, worm. 4 (Freely.) Fire, energy, vigor, mettle, pluck, heart, power, capability, bottom (of man, horse, bullock &c.): life, spirit, productiveness (in a work or business): strength, firmness, soundness, substantialness (of articles, cloth &c.): truth, reality, solidity, consistency (of tidings, of a report): animation, beauty, force (of a writing). Ex. hyā vyavahārāmadhyēṃ jīva nāhīṃ kēlā na kēlā sārakhā; chatrīcā jīva halakā mhaṇūna vāṛyānēṃ phāṭalī; tyā vastrālā agadī jīva nāhīṃ; hyā bātamīmadhyēṃ, tyā granthānta jīva disata nāhīṃ. 5 Mind, intention, inclination. Ex. ēka jīva mhaṇatō jāvēṃ ēka jīva mhaṇatō na jāvēṃ. 6 The sentient or personal soul. See jīvātmā. ardhā jīva karaṇēṃ g. of o. To half-kill a person (by teasing &c.) ardhā jīva hōṇēṃ g. of s. To be worked, worried, frightened &c. to death's door. āpa- lyā jivālā khāṇēṃ To pine or fret. ēka jīva yēṇēṃ ēka jīva jāṇēṃ To be quivering in the last agonies. ēka jīva hōūna jāṇēṃ To unite, join, coalesce; to become one. jīva aṭaṇēṃ g. of o. To work hard or to worry to death. jīva aṭaṇēṃ g. of s. To exhaust or waste one's self (through exertion, care &c.) jīva aḍakaṇēṃ or ṭāṅgaṇēṃ g. of s. or ṭāṅgalā asaṇēṃ To hang or rest upon (any loved object); to be set upon. jīva adhāntarīṃ uḍaṇēṃ g. of s. To be bewildered or perplexed; to lose one's self-possession. jīva ardhā karaṇēṃ To spend one's strength (in toil, vain instructing &c.); and jīva ardhā hōṇēṃ g. of s. (kāmākhālīṃ or cālūna-raḍūna-kaṣṭakarūna &c.) To be half-dead. jīva kālaviṇēṃ g. of s. To be in great trepidation or apprehensive commotion. jīva kōra- ḍā hōṇēṃ or paḍaṇēṃ To dry, waste away, fall in--a person from sickness, fatigue, hunger &c. Also jīva sukaṇēṃ. jīva kharaḍūna With might and main-- bōlaṇēṃ-raḍaṇēṃ speaking, bellowing, bawling. jīva khā- ūna kāma karaṇēṃ To work with all one's soul and strength. jīva khāṇēṃ or ghēṇēṃ g. of o. or jivāsa khāṇēṃ To tease one's life out; to prey upon. jīva khālīṃ paḍaṇēṃ g. of s. To have one's ardent desire gratified. jīva gōḷā hōṇēṃ g. of s. To be about to die. jīva ghēūna paḷaṇēṃ To flee for one's life. Ex. nagarīṃ kōṇācī kōṇa vārttā || paḷati jīva ghēuniyā ||. jīva jāḷaṇēṃ or māraṇēṃ To repress or mortify (the lusts and passions). jīva ṭākaṇēṃ To throw up one's life. 2 To despond; to refuse consolation. 3 To hanker after immoderately and passionately; to give one's soul to. 4 (Preceded by a participle of the ūna form, as raḍūna, hāsūna, khaṇūna &c.) To cry, laugh, dig &c. with exceeding vehemence and effort. jīva ṭākūna paḷaṇēṃ To flee for one's life. jīva ṭhikā- ṇīṃ nasaṇēṃ g. of s. To be disconcerted or discomposed; to be thrown off one's balance. jīva tuṭaṇēṃ g. of s. To be wearied out of one's life. jīva tōḍa- ṇēṃ To be painfully anxious or apprehensive. jīva tōḍūna karaṇēṃ To do very sedulously or strenuously. jīva thārīṃ basaṇēṃ To find rest to one's soul. jīva thōḍathōḍā hōṇēṃ g. of s. (To be languishing, failing, dying.) To be extremely solicitous about, or painfully affected by; to be sinking under; to misgive and lose heart. jīva dēṇēṃ To commit suicide. 2 To give the whole soul to; to strain every nerve. jīva dharaṇēṃ To brighten up; to acquire new vigor: also to begin to recover. jīva dharūna (Plucking up or gathering spirit.) Earnestly, engagedly, intently, with alacrity or animation--performing, acting. jīva pachāḍaṇēṃ To prostrate one's self in great earnestness of supplication. jīva paḍaṇēṃ g. of s. To enter into heartily; to become interested in. jīva pākhaḍaṇēṃ To take great pains or make earnest and strenuous efforts. 2 To chafe and fume and storm at. jīva pāpī (Ah! sinful soul, ah! corrupt spirit.) An ejaculation on detecting in one's self (or in another) an evil thought. jīva pōḷaṇēṃ To burn one's fingers; to learn a lesson. jīva pyārā as Pr. jyācā tyālā jīva pyārā No man ever hated his own flesh. jīva basaṇēṃ with vara of o. g. of s. To have great delight in or fondness for. jīva bhāṇḍyānta paḍaṇēṃ g. of s. To get into peace or at ease; to find a settlement and rest. jīva muṭhīnta dharaṇēṃ (To take or hold one's life in one's fist.) To go, do, behave, or be, holding one's life closely and carefully (because of danger). 2 To hold one's self in restraint or under government. jīva mōṭhā or mōṭhā jīva karaṇēṃ To make a vigorous effort, or to summon up boldness or fortitude. 2 To arouse one's self into great liberality (of giving or of expending). jīva rākhaṇēṃ To spare one's self; to work lazily. jīva vara dharaṇēṃ or vara (or varatā) jīva dharaṇēṃ To be eager after or impatiently desirous of. jīva vārā piṇēṃ To feel desolate, melancholy, dreary, heavy. jīva sōḍaṇēṃ To give up the ghost; or to sacrifice one's life. To crave or desire intensely. To wave (a living fowl &c.) around (a sick person) that it may receive his malady. The fowl &c. is then cast away, and is supposed to die. jivā agōcara Beyond one's power; exceeding one's ability. (i. e. The soul is not able to contemplate such a matter.) jivā āgaḷā Exceeding one's power of performance or endurance. jivācā ghāta karaṇēṃ To strain every nerve; to exhaust one's self in effort. 2 g. ofo. To harass sorely; to worry to death. jivācā ghōṭa ghēṇēṃ To take one's life-blood; i. e. to plague to death. jivācā lōḷa karaṇēṃ To harass or weary out of one's life. jivācī kōyakōya karaṇēṃ (To make one disposed to bark like a cur.) To worry exceedingly. jivācī gvāhī or pākhī dēṇēṃ To attest upon one's soul or life; to give one's most solemn assurance. jivācī rāḷavaṇa karaṇēṃ (To make one's soul like the straw of rāḷā) To work, weary, or vex exceedingly. jivācī hulaḍa karaṇēṃ To make a strong and determined effort. jivācē cāra karaṇēṃ To be dainty, delicate, nice, fanciful, whimsical, humorsome. jivānta jīva āhē tōmparyanta As long as there is life (in me, you &c.) jivānta jīva ghālaṇēṃ To restore or revive one's life, courage, fainting spirit &c. 2 To cast one's soul into the soul of another; i. e. to convey one's own mind or thoughts unto. jivānta jīva yēṇēṃ To revive--lost strength or courage. jivāniśīṃ With one's own soul, life, strength, power &c. (i. e. not through another). jivāniśīṃ jāṇēṃ To lose life (through some violence, or with prematureness). jivāparatā That is beyond one's strength to bear--toil, sickness &c. 2 Dearer than life; beyond one's own soul--loved &c. jivāpalīkaḍē Beyond life (i. e. dearer than &c.) jivālā khāṇēṃ To undergo remorse or bitter compunction. jivāvara Upon one's own life or strength or exertions--living, working, performing. jivāvara uṭhaṇēṃ To rise up against the life of. jivāvara āpalēṃ pōṭa bharaṇēṃ g. of o. To board at the cost of; to live upon. jivāvara uḍyā māraṇēṃ To indulge or enjoy one's self in dependence upon the life or well-being of. jivāvara udāra Reckless of life. Pr. ji0 tō lākhāśīṃ jhuñjāra. jivāvaracā That falls upon or endangers life. Hence jivāvaracā-lāga m -pāḷī f -gōṣṭa f -prasaṅga m -khēḷa m -kāma n Terms for an imminent peril or hazard; jeopardy of life. Also jivāvaracā tāpa-jvara-rōga-dukhaṇēṃ A dangerous fever or sickness. jivāvaracēṃ adhaṇa utaraṇēṃ g. of s. To obtain relief from some afflictive or oppressive circumstances. jivāvara yēṇēṃ. or bitaṇēṃ or jivāsīṃ- gāṇṭha paḍaṇēṃ To affect or concern vitally, dangerously, deeply, closely; to fall or bear hard upon. jivāsa karavata lāgaṇēṃ To be keenly pressing upon. jivāsa jahānagirī (karaṇēṃ or hōṇēṃ) Danger to life; jeopardy: also the matter or occasion of jeopardy. jivāsa jīva dēṇēṃ To give life for life, heart for heart &c.; to love (a friend &c.) as one's own soul. jivāsa mukaṇēṃ To lose life, to perish. jivāsīṃ or jivīṃ dharaṇēṃ or bāndhaṇēṃ To love or prize dearly. jivīṃ lāgaṇēṃ To be greatly interesting or dear unto. 2 To enter into the quick; to affect vitally or powerfully. jivēṃ vāñcaṇēṃ To be saved or preserved; to be delivered from a jeopardy or impending death; to escape with life. Ex. ājī āmhā yēthēṃ rākhiyēlēṃ dēvēṃ || nāhīṃ tarīṃ jivēṃ na vāñcatōṃ ||.

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jīvā (जीवा).—f S The chord of an arc: also the sine of an arc.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jīva (जीव).—m Life. A living being. A small in- sect or creature, e.g., a mite, maggot, worm. Vigour, energy, mettle, pluck, capability:life, spirit, productiveness (in a work or business): strength, firmness; truth reality, consistency (of tidings, of a report): animation, beauty, force (of a writing). Mind, intention, inclination. Ex. ēka jīva mhaṇatō jāvēṃ āṇi ēka jīva mhaṇatō na jāvēṃ. ardhā jīva karaṇēṃ. Half-kill a person. ardhā jīva hōṇēṃ Be worked, worried, frightened, &c., to death's door. ēka jīva yēṇēṃ ēka jīva jāṇēṃ Be quivering in the last agonies. ēka jīva hōūna jāṇēṃ To unite, join, coa- lesce, to become one. jīva aṭaṇēṃ Work hard or worry to death; exhaust one's self. jīva aḍakaṇēṃ or ṭāṅgaṇēṃ or ṭāṅgalā asaṇēṃ To hang or rest upon (any loved object), to be set upon. jīva ardhā hōṇēṃ Be half dead. jīva khālīṃ paḍaṇēṃ To have one's ardent desire gratified. jīva gōḷā hōṇēṃ To be about to die. jīva ghēūna paḷaṇēṃ Flee for one's life. jīva ṭākaṇēṃ Throw up one's life; give one's soul to. jīva ṭhikāṇīṃ nasaṇēṃ Be disconcerted. jīva tōḍaṇēṃ Be painfully anxious or apprehensive. jīva tōḍūna karaṇēṃ Do very sedulously or strenuously. jīva thārīṃ basaṇēṃ Find rest to one's soul. jīva thōḍathōḍā hōṇēṃ To be extremely solicitous about or painfully affected by. Be sinking under. jīva dēṇēṃ Commit suicide. Strain every nerve, give the whole soul to. jīva dharaṇēṃ Acquire new vigour; also being to recover. jīva bhāṇḍyānta paḍaṇēṃ To get into peace or at ease; to find a settlement and rest. jīva muṭhīnta dharaṇēṃ (To take or hold life in one's fist.) To go, do, behave, hold- ing one's life closely and carefully (because of danger). To hold one's self in restraint or under government. jīva rākhaṇēṃ Spare one's self, work lazily. jivā āgaḷā Exceeding one's power of performance or endur- ance. jivācā ghōṭa ghēṇēṃ Plague to death.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jīva (जीव).—a. [jīv-kartari ka] Living, existing; जीवपुत्रे निवर्तस्व (jīvaputre nivartasva) Rām.4.19.11; असच्च सज्जीवमजीवमन्यत् (asacca sajjīvamajīvamanyat) Bhāg.5.1.12.

-vaḥ 1 The principle of life, the vital breath, life, soul; गतजीव, जीवत्याग, जीवाशा (gatajīva, jīvatyāga, jīvāśā) &c.

2) The individual or personal soul enshrined in the human body and imparting to it life, motion and sensation (called jīvātman as opposed to paramātman the Supreme Soul); Y.3.131; Ms.12.22-23; सम्पद्यते गुणैर्मुक्तो जीवो जीवं विहाय माम् । जीवो जीवविनिर्मुक्तो गुणैश्चाशयसंभवैः (sampadyate guṇairmukto jīvo jīvaṃ vihāya mām | jīvo jīvavinirmukto guṇaiścāśayasaṃbhavaiḥ) || Bhāg.11.25.36. (here jīva = liṅgaśarīra).

3) Life, existence.

4) A creature, living being.

5) Livelihood, profession.

6) Name of Karṇa.

7) Name of one of the Maruts.

8) The constellation पुष्य (puṣya).

9) Name of Bṛhaspati.

1) The third lustrum in the cycle of Jupiter.

11) Association of cause and effect.

12) Name of Viṣṇu.

--- OR ---

Jīvā (जीवा).—a. [jīv-ac]

1) Water.

2) The earth.

3) A bow-string; मुहुर्जीवाघोषैर्बधिरयति (muhurjīvāghoṣairbadhirayati) Mv.6.3.

4) The chord of an arc.

5) Means of living.

6) The tinkling of metallic ornaments.

7) Name of a plant (vacā).

8) Life, existence.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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