Janardana, aka: Janārdana, Jana-ardana; 12 Definition(s)

Introduction

Janardana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

[Janardana in Pancaratra glossaries]

Janārdana (जनार्दन, “world-mover”):—One of the twenty-four forms of Viṣṇu through which Nārāyaṇa manifests himself. The meaning of this title is “The protector from negative forces”. He is accompanied by a counterpart emanation of Lakṣmī (an aspect of Devī) who goes by the name Umā.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Pāñcarātra
Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[Janardana in Shaktism glossaries]

Janārdana (जनार्दन, “Exciting, or Agitating, Men”):—Another name for Viṣṇu, as in, one of the male offspring from Mahāsarasvatī (sattva-form of Mahādevī). Mahāsarasvatī is one of the three primary forms of Devī, the other two being Mahālakṣmī and Mahākālī. Not to be confused with Sarasvatī, she is a more powerful cosmic aspect (vyaṣṭi) of Devi and represents the guṇa (universal energy) named sattva. Also see the Devī Māhātmya, a Sanskrit work from the 5th century, incorporated into the Mārkaṇḍeya-Purāṇa.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śāktism
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana

[Janardana in Purana glossaries]

1) Janārdana (जनार्दन).—A synonym of Mahāvīṣṇu (Śrī Kṛṣṇa). Because he made the Dasyus (Asuras—demons) tremble, Śrī Kṛṣṇa was called Janārdana.

"He, who has lotus as his seat, who is eternal, imperishable and unchangeable, he who has all these attributes is Puṇḍarīkākṣa (lotus-eyed) and he who makes the Asuras tremble is Janārdana." (Mahābhārata Udyoga Parva, Chapter 70, Stanza 6).

2) Janārdana (जनार्दन).—See under Ḍibaka.

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Janārdana (जनार्दन).—A name of Vāsudeva;1 Viṣṇu who took the form of Hayagrīva and appeared before Agastya at Kāñcī;2 as brother of Devī put down the Hiraṇyas in the Bhaṇḍa-Lalitā war;3 as Kalki put down the Hūṇas, Yavanas, etc;4 in the form of Pitṛs in Gayā;5 became black due to poison;6 becomes Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Śiva affected by the qualities of satva, rajas and tamas;7 manifestation and forms described.8

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 51; 106. 54.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 19. 180; 25. 56-7; III. 71. 78 and 93; 73. 87; IV. 5. 8, 14; 9. 28, 47, 64; 12. 21; 15. 14.
  • 3) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 29. 103, 133.
  • 4) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 39. 49.
  • 5) Vāyu-purāṇa 108. 85, 89; 109. 24 and 34.
  • 6) Vāyu-purāṇa 54. 59.
  • 7) Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 2. 61-7.
  • 8) Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 22. 23-72; III. 8. 11; 18. 35.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

[Janardana in Chandas glossaries]

Janārdana (जनार्दन) or Janārdana Vibudha (disciple of Ananta and protégé of Kṛṣṇadeva) is the author of the Vṛttapradīpa.—Janārdana Vibudha’s other work includes commentary Bhāvārthadīpikā on Vṛttaratnākara of Kedāra Bhaṭṭa. He mentions about his preceptor Ananta and patron Kṛṣṇadeva, in the introductory verse of his commentary on Vṛttaratnākara.

(Source): Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[Janardana in Hinduism glossaries]

Janārdana is another name of Vishnu or God and appears as the 126th name in the Vishnu sahasranama. It is also a common name of Krishna being address as such by Arjuna in the Bhagavad Gita.

According to Adi Sankara' s commentary on the Vishnu sahasranama, translated by Swami Tapasyananda, Janardana means "One who inflicts suffering on evil men." Alternatively, it means, "He to whom all devotees pray for worldly success and liberation,".

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

One of the twenty-four avatāras (incarnations) of Viṣṇu. He takes the form of the planets, and distributes the consequences of actions to living beings.

(Source): Oxford Reference: A Dictionary of Hinduism

Janārdana (जनार्दन).—A name for the Supreme Personality of Godhead meaning “He who is the original abode and protector of all living beings”.

(Source): ISKCON Press: Glossary

India history and geogprahy

[Janardana in India history glossaries]

Janārdana (fl. 1049 AD), the son of Vevala Ṣaḍaṅgavid, is mentioned in the “Ṭhāṇā plates of Mummuṇirāja”. Accordingly, Janārdana is mentioned amongst fourteen Brāhmaṇas living together, hailing from Karahāṭaka (Karahāṭa), as receiving a gift of several villages. He is associated with the Kāśyapa gotra (clan)

These copper plates (mentioning Janārdana) were discovered in 1956 while digging the ground between the Church and the District Office at Ṭhāṇā, the chief town of the Ṭhāṇā District in Mahārāṣṭra. Its object is to record the grant, by the Śilāhāra Mummuṇirāja, of some villages and lands to learned Brāhmaṇas on the occasion of the lunar eclipse on the fifteenth tithi of the bright fortnight of Phālguna in the Śaka year 970, the cyclic year being Sarvadhārin.

(Source): What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[Janardana in Marathi glossaries]

janārdana (जनार्दन).—m (S Punisher of man.) A name of viṣṇu as God.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

janārdana (जनार्दन).—m A name of viṣṇu as God.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Janardana in Sanskrit glossaries]

Janārdana (जनार्दन).—an epithet of Visnu or Krisna.

Derivable forms: janārdanaḥ (जनार्दनः).

Janārdana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jana and ardana (अर्दन).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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