Durlabha, Dur-labha, Durlabhā: 24 definitions

Introduction:

Durlabha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Durlabh.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Durlabhā (दुर्लभा) is another name for Śvetakaṇṭakārī, a medicinal plant related to Kaṇṭakārī, according to verse 4.33-36 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Durlabhā and Śvetakaṇṭakārī, there are a total of twenty-four Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Durlabhā (दुर्लभा) is also mentioned as a synonym for Dhanvayāsa, an unidentified medicinal plant, according to verse 4.53-55. Together with the names Durlabhā and Dhanvayāsa, there are a total of fourteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) refers to “that which is hard to acquire”, according to the Kālī teachings of Abhinava’s Jayadrathayāmala.—Accordingly, “That energy (called) Kuṇḍalinī resides in the Secret Wheel (in the genitals). O fair lady, that place which fulfils all desires should always be kept secret. Then (it is called) Guhyā (the Hidden One) and is always more secret than the secret. The nectar that comes out of this is hard to acquire [i.e., durlabha] by gods or demons. A thousand rebirths are destroyed in the Ocean of Kula of one who possesses it. [...] Amā, the energy of the (New) Moon is located in the Door of Brahmā. Pure water falls (from) there and, having fallen into the heart of Kuṇḍalī, the nectar which is the juice of Kuṇḍalī comes out of his body. By just eating this, (Yogis) become immortal and free of old age, wrinkles, white hair and all diseases.”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) refers to “(that which is) difficult to obtain”, according to Sāhib Kaul’s Śārikāstrotra.—Accordingly, “[...] He who remembers your next syllable, which is īśa with abja, vahni, and padma, is remembered by goddesses in heaven, Nāga maidens in the netherworld, and women on earth confused by the arrows of Kāma. One of pure mind who recites with complete devotion the lakṣmī-syllable, which is difficult (durlabha) for bad people to obtain, him the goddess of good fortune will always be eager to see, and although unsteady (by nature) she will remain at his doorstep out of devotion. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Durlabha in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) refers to “that which is hard to attain”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.27 (“Description of the fraudulent words of the Brahmacārin”).—Accordingly, as Pārvatī said to Śiva (in guise of a Brahmacārin): “O great Brahmin, listen to my story entirely. What my friend has said just now is the whole truth, not otherwise. I am telling you the truth and not a lie. Śiva has been wooed by me, by mind, speech and action as well as by means of ascetic feelings. I know that it is an inaccessible object. How can I attain it [i.e., durlabha]? Still out of my eagerness I am performing this penance”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) refers to “difficult to obtain”, according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “[The intercourse (saṃga)]:—[...] This is the secret of alchemy. He should not reveal it to others. This secret of the Siddha tradition, which is difficult to obtain (durlabha), has now been taught. It is to be revealed through the compassion of the Guru. What else do you wish to hear?”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) refers to “that which is difficult to find”, according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “Such a Court Officiant who is [himself] like a Guru to Kings is difficult to find (durlabha). Such a one is verily capable of warding off the flood of misdeeds [and their consequences] for Kings. Therefore, he alone is able to perform the rituals of protection of Kings. He who has such a Guru [by his side] shall become a sovereign King, one with a long life, one free of enemies and diseases and a slayer of hostile heroes”.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) refers to “(that which is) hard to find”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 41).—Accordingly, “[Digression on a case brought against the Buddha; B. The defense].—[6. Use of a Stone Bowl].—‘The Buddha forbade the Bhikṣus to use eight kinds of bowls (pātra)’.—[Bowls 1–4]: Precious bowls of gold (suvarṇa), silver (rūpya), [beryl (vaiḍūrya) and pearl (maṇi)]. – Since people covet precious things, since the latter are hard to find (durlabha) and because people are attached to them, the Buddha prohibits the keeping (dhāraṇa) of these precious substances. He does not allow even touching (sparśana) that which is ‘precious’ and neither does he allow keeping it. If such a gift is made [to the Bhikṣus], he allows them to realize their value, but not too expensive. [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) (Cf. Sudurlabha) refers to “difficulty” (in obtaining enlightenment), according to the Praśamaratiprakaraṇa 149-50 (p. 93-4).—Accordingly, “(A monk) should reflect, upon transcient [sic] nature of the world, helplessness, loneliness, separateness of the self from non-self, impurity (of the body), cycle of births sand [sic] rebirths, inflow of Karmas and stoppage of inflow of Karmas; Shedding of stock of Karmas, constitution of the universe, nature of true religion, difficulty in obtaining enlightenment (sudurlabhatvabodheḥ sudurlabhatvaṃ), which are (called) twelve pure Bhāvanās (reflections)”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Durlabha.—(EI 23), an official designation of uncertain import. Note: durlabha is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: OpenEdition books: Vividhatīrthakalpaḥ (History)

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) refers to one of the kings of the Caulukya (Cālukka) dynasty of Gujarat, as is mentioned in the Vividhatīrthakalpa by Jinaprabhasūri (13th century A.D.): an ancient text devoted to various Jaina holy places (tīrthas).—List of the eleven Caulukya kings of which Aṇahilapura was the capital: Mūlarāja, Cāmuṇḍarāja, Vallabharāja, Durlabha, Bhīmadeva, Karṇa, Jayasiṃha, Kumārapāla, Ajayapāla, Bālamūlarāja, Bhīmadeva.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

durlabha (दुर्लभ).—a (S) Difficult of obtainment or acquisition.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

durlabha (दुर्लभ).—a Difficult of obtainment or acquisition.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Durlabha (दुर्लभ).—a.

1) difficult to be attained, or accomplished; R.1.67;17.7; Kumārasambhava 4.4;5.46,61; दुर्लभं भारते जन्म मानुष्यं तत्र दुर्लभम् (durlabhaṃ bhārate janma mānuṣyaṃ tatra durlabham) Subhāṣ.

2) difficult to be found or met with, scarce, rare; शुद्धान्तदुर्लभम् (śuddhāntadurlabham) Ś.1.17.

3) best, excellent, eminent.

Durlabha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dur and labha (लभ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durlabha (दुर्लभ).—mfn.

(-bhaḥ-bhā-bhaṃ) 1. Difficult of attainment. 2. Excellent, eminent. 3. Dear, beloved. m.

(-bhaḥ) A plant, (a sort of Hedysarum:) see

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durlabha (दुर्लभ).—i. e. dus-labh + a, adj., f. bhā. 1. Hard to be attained, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 137. 2. Hard to be found, 7, 22. 3. Difficult to be saved, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 25, 28. 4. Difficult, Mahābhārata 3, 1728.

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Durlābha (दुर्लाभ).—adj. difficult to be got, Mahābhārata 12, 11168. Dvi

Durlābha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dus and lābha (लाभ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durlabha (दुर्लभ).—[adjective] difficult to be obtained or seen; rare, precious dear; difficult i.[grammar] ([with] infin.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—father of Gaṇa (Aśvāyurveda). W. p. 291.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Durlabha (दुर्लभ):—[=dur-labha] [from dur] mfn. d° to be obtained or found, hard, scarce, rare ([compound] -tara), [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] hard to be (with [infinitive mood] [Mahābhārata iii, 1728])

3) [v.s. ...] extraordinary, eminent, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] dear, beloved (also -ka), [Kāraṇḍa-vyūha]

5) [v.s. ...] m. Curcuma Amhaldi or Zerumbet, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of a man, [Catalogue(s)]

7) Durlabhā (दुर्लभा):—[=dur-labhā] [from dur-labha > dur] f. Alhagi Maurorum or = śveta-kaṇṭa-kārī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) Durlābha (दुर्लाभ):—[=dur-lābha] [from dur] mfn. = -labha, [Mahābhārata xii, 11168.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durlabha (दुर्लभ):—[dur-labha] (bhaḥ-bhā-bhaṃ) a. Difficult of attainment, dear. m. A plant (Hedysarum). f. Prickly nightshade.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Dulaha, Dullaṃbha, Dullaha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Durlabha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Durlabha in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Durlabha (दुर्लभ) [Also spelled durlabh]:—(a) rare, scarce; unattainable; unavailable; excellent; unique; ~[] rarity, scarcity; unavailability; excellence.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Durlabha (ದುರ್ಲಭ):—

1) [adjective] that is not available, cannot be got easily or regularly.

2) [adjective] happening, occurring rarely; rare; scarce.

3) [adjective] excellent or surpassing all others.

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Durlabhā (ದುರ್ಲಭಾ):—[noun] the plant Fagonia cretica (= F. arabica) of Zygophyllaceae family.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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