Caritra, aka: Caritrā, Cāritra, Carītra; 12 Definition(s)

Introduction

Caritra means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Charitra.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

1) Caritra (चरित्र):—The name for a ‘sacred site’ associated with the group of eight deities (mātṛ) born from Mahimā, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra. Mahimā is the seventh of the Eight Mahāmātṛs, residing within the Mātṛcakra (third of the five cakras) and represents the earth.

2) Caritrā (चरित्रा):—Sanskrit name for one of the twenty-four sacred sites of the Sūryamaṇḍala, the first maṇḍala of the Khecarīcakra, according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. The Khecarīcakra is the fifth and final cakra located just above the head. Each one of these holy sites (pītha) is presided over by a particular Khecarī (‘sky-goddess’). This Caritrā-pītha is connected with the goddess Kṛṣṇā (also called Kṛṣṇāsyā).

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Caritra (चरित्र) is the name of a sacred site (pīṭha) to be assigned to the fontanelle (randhra) during the pīṭhavidhi (‘ritual of sacred sites’) according to the Tantrāloka chapter 29. This chapter of the Tantrāloka by Abhinavagupta expounds details regarding the Kula initiation ritual. Kula or Kaula is a specific tradition within Śaivism, closely related to Siddhānta and Śaktism.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Caritrā (चरित्रा) refers to one of the twenty-four sacred districts mentioned in the Kubjikāmatatantra (chapter 22). Prayāga is presided over by the Goddess (Devī) named Kṛṣṇā accompanied by the Field-protector (Kṣetrapāla) named Mahābala. Their weapon possibly corresponds to the śakti and their abode is the karañja-tree. A similar system appears in the 9th century Vajraḍākatantra (chapter 18).

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II) (shaivism)
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

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Cāritra (चारित्र).—A Marut gaṇa.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 171. 54.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Cāritra (चारित्र) is the name of an ancient country located beneath the Jñānabimbakāya-stūpa, according to Sakya Paṇḍita (12th century).—[The Jñānabimbakāya-stūpa] is said to be present in the form of rainbow-colored light, in the sky above the so-called “town stūpa”, in the land of Koṅkana, which hugs the ocean shore in South [West] India. The venerable Sakya Paṇḍita has referred to the whole region that lies beneath this stūpa in the following verse: “This land, known as Cāritra, is located by the ocean shore, in the south”.

With regard to that land known as Cāritra, it is where Vajravārāhī is known to have ritually summoned or brought together all the ale of the three levels of existence. After she had mixed all the yeast and grain liquor that there was, the quantity increased manifoldly, and when the essence of that yeast had been exhausted, she let it set for a while, so that its potency was renewed. After this had happened on seven occasions, subsequently at auspicious times, the whole region of Koṅkana was permeated by the fragrance of the wine.

Source: Google Books: The Treasury of Knowledge: Book six, parts one and two

Caritra (चरित्र) refers to one of the twenty-four sacred districts mentioned in the 9th century Vajraḍākatantra (chapter 18). These districts are not divided into subgroups, nor are explained their internal locations. They [viz., Caritra] are external holy places, where the Tantric meting is held with native women who are identified as a native goddess. A similar system appears in the tradition of Hindu Tantrims, i.e., in the Kubjikāmatatantra (chapter 22), which belongs to the Śākta sect or Śaivism. Note: In the Kubjikāmatatantra, the name is spelled as Caritrā and has Kṛṣṇā as the presiding deity and Mahābala as the Kṣetrapāla.

Caritra is presided over by the Goddess (Devī) named Karañjavāsinī accompanied by the Field-protector (Kṣetrapāla) named Mahāghaṇṭa or Mahābala. Their weapon possibly corresponds to the mudrā and śakti and their abode (residence) is mentioned as being a karañja-tree.

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

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Cāritra (चारित्र, “conduct”).—What is the meaning of conduct? Behaviour or the way an individual lives is called his conduct.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 1
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Caritra in Marathi glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

caritra (चरित्र).—n (S) pop. carita n Actions, deeds, proceedings; esp. the exploits, feats, and achievements of gods and heroes. Pr. strīcēṃ ca0 āṇi puruṣācēṃ bhāgya kōṇhāsa samajata nāhīṃ. Ex. kathīna caritarūpēṃ vyāsa bhāvārtha hō tō.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

caritra (चरित्र).—n Actions, deeds, proceedings; esp. the exploits, feats, and achieve- ments of gods and heroes. Biography.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Caritra (चरित्र).—[car itra]

1) Behaviour, habit, conduct, practice, acts, deeds.

2) Performance, observance.

3) History, life, biography, account, adventures.

4) Nature, disposition.

5) Duty, established or instituted observance; Ms.2.2,9.7.

6) A foot, leg.

7) Going.

-trā The tamarind tree.

Derivable forms: caritram (चरित्रम्).

--- OR ---

Carītra (चरीत्र).—Behaviour, conduct, practice &c.

Derivable forms: carītram (चरीत्रम्).

--- OR ---

Cāritra (चारित्र).—[car-ṇitran Uṇ.4.171; caritrameva svārthe aṇ vā] (also written cāritryam)

1) Conduct, behaviour, manner of acting; कुलाक्रोशकरं लोके धिक् ते चारित्रमीदृशम् (kulākrośakaraṃ loke dhik te cāritramīdṛśam) Rām.3.53. 9.

2) Good manner or character, reputation, probity, uprightness, good conduct; अनृतं नाभिधास्यामि चारित्रभ्रंश- कारणम् (anṛtaṃ nābhidhāsyāmi cāritrabhraṃśa- kāraṇam) Mk.3.26,25; चारित्र्यविहीन आढ्योऽपि च दुर्गतो भवति (cāritryavihīna āḍhyo'pi ca durgato bhavati) 1.43.

3) Chastity, purity of life (of women).

4) Disposition, temperament.

5) Peculiar observance or practice.

6) Hereditary observance.

-trā The tamarind tree.

Derivable forms: cāritram (चारित्रम्).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Cāritra (चारित्र).—(nt.), in °tram āpadyate (with loc.; = Pali cārittaṃ āpajjati, with loc.), has dealings with, visits, cultivates, esp. said of a monk who takes food at the house of laymen: (bhikṣuḥ…) kuleṣu cāritram āpadyeta Prāt 522.4. The Pali phrase is rendered goes on his (beg- ging) rounds in SBE 13.42.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 100 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Panditaradhya-caritra
Paṇḍitārādhya-caritra, written by Pālkuriki Somanātha, is one of those works written during or ...
Sucaritra
Sucaritra (सुचरित्र).—n. (-traṃ) Good or virtuous course of life. f. (-trā) A devoted and virtu...
Stricaritra
Strīcaritra (स्त्रीचरित्र).—the doing of women. Derivable forms: strīcaritram (स्त्रीचरित्रम्)....
Caritrabandhaka
Caritrabandhaka (चरित्रबन्धक).—n. (-kaṃ) A friendly pledge, one of unequal value to the loan. E...
Anantacaritra
Anantacāritra (अनन्तचारित्र).—n. of a Bodhisattva: SP 300.13.
Lokacaritra
Lokacaritra (लोकचरित्र).—n. (-traṃ) The ways of the world.
Siddheśvara-caritra
Siddheśvara-caritra, written by Kāse Sarvappa, is one of the works written during or after the ...
Caritramohaniya
Cāritramohanīya (चारित्रमोहनीय) refers to “conduct deluding (karmas)” and represents ...
Caritrarya
Cāritrārya (चारित्रार्य) refers to “civilized people with right conduct” and represents one of ...
Pratapa-caritra
Siddheśvara-caritra, written by Ekamranātha, is one of the works written during or after the ru...
Keyurabahu-caritra
Keyūrabāhu-caritra, written by Mancana, is part of one the works written during or after the ru...
Palanativira-caritra
Palanāṭivīra-caritra, written by Śrīnātha, is one of those works written during or after the ru...
Caritravinaya
Cāritravinaya (चारित्रविनय).—What is meant by ‘reverence to conduct’ (cāritra-vinaya)? Absorpti...
Caritradevata
Cāritradevatā (चारित्रदेवता).—the presiding deity of virtue or chastity; U.7.Cāritradevatā is a...
Kucaritra
Kucaritra (कुचरित्र).—wickedness, evil conduct, impropriety; Ms.9.17. Derivable forms: kucaritr...

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