Abhira, aka: Ābhīra, Abhīra; 10 Definition(s)

Introduction

Abhira means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

[Abhira in Purana glossaries]

1a) Ābhīra (आभीर).—Country of Ābhīras.1 Dvijas of, became vrātyas after Puramjaya's days.2 Purified of sin by devotion to Hari.3 Seven of this tribe ruled from Avabhṛti.4 The braḥmāṇḍa and vāyu say ten of them ruled after the Āndhras;5 for 67 years.

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa I. 10. 35; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 46 and 57; 18. 48.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa XII 1. 38.
  • 3) Ib. II. 4. 18.
  • 4) Bhāgavata-purāṇa XII. 1. 29; Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 359; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 24. 51, 68.
  • 5) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 174; Matsya-purāṇa 50. 76; 114. 40; 163. 72; 273. 18.

1b) A tribe of Dakṣiṇāpatha saw Arjuna singly carrying much wealth and women and attacked him; he took up his gāṇḍiva and found he had lost its secret and power;1 freebooters and shepherds of the Pañcanada country who lived in villages; mlecchas; chief weapons of, staves and cudgels.2

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 115, 126; 47. 46; 99. 269; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 3. 16.
  • 2) Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 38. 14-28, 50-52.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Abhira in Natyashastra glossaries]

Ābhīra (आभीर) refers to one of the seven “minor dialects” (vibhāṣā) in language used in dramatic composition (nāṭya), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 18.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

[Abhira in Chandas glossaries]

Ābhīra (आभीर) refers to one of the twenty-seven mātrāvṛttas (quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Mātrāvṛtta (eg., ābhīra) refers to a type of metre found in classical Sanskrit poetry.

(Source): Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

[Abhira in Itihasa glossaries]

Ābhīra (आभीर) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.29.9, VI.10.45) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Ābhīra) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

[Abhira in Arthashastra glossaries]

Ābhīra (आभीर) refers to a “cowherd” and represents an official title used in the political management of townships in ancient India. Officers, ministers, and sovereigns bearing such titles [eg., Ābhīra] were often present in ancient inscriptions when, for example, the king wanted to address his subjects or make an important announcement.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Arthaśāstra
Arthashastra book cover
context information

Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

[Abhira in India history glossaries]

Ābhīra.—The South-eastern portion of Gujarat about the mouths of tho Norbudda wascalled Ābhīra,—the Aberia of tho Greeks. McCrindle states that tho country of tho Ābhīras lay to tho cast of tho Indus where it bifurcates to form tho delta (McCrindlc’s Ptolemy, p. 140 ; Viṣṇu-purāṇa, ch. 5). The Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa (ch. 6) also says that the Indus flowed through tho country of Ābhīra. According to tho Mahābhārata (Sabhā Parva, ch. 31), the Ābhīras lived near tbo seashore and on tho bank of tho Sarasvatī, a river near Somnāth in Gujarat. Sir Henry Elliot says that tho country on the western coast of India from the Tāptī to Devngaḍh is called Ābhīra (Elliot’s Supplemental Glossary, vol. 1, pp. 2, 3). Mr. W. H. Schoff is of opinion that it is tho southern part of Gujarat, which contains Surat (Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, pp. 39, 175). Accordingto Lassen, Ābhīra is tho Ophir of tho Bible. The Tārā-tantra says that tho country of Ābhīra extended from Koṅkaṇa southwards to tho western bank of tho river Tāptī (sco Ward’s History, Literature and Religion of the Hindus, Vol. 1, p. 559).

(Source): archive.org: The Geographical Dictionary of Ancient and Mediaeval India

Ābhīra (आभीर) is the name of a tribe mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. These tribes (eg., the Ābhīras, latin: Abhiras) migrated to places other than their original settlemenets and gave their names to the janapadas they settled. They replaced the old Vedic tribes in Punjab and Rajasthan though some of them are deemed as offshoots of the main tribe..

(Source): archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[Abhira in Marathi glossaries]

ābhīra (आभीर).—m S A cowherd or herdsman. According to Ptolemy's geography ā0 is the name of a tribe originally established about the mouths of the Indus.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ābhīra (आभीर).—m A cowherd or herdsman. ābhēḷa n The sky. Cloudiness.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Abhira in Sanskrit glossaries]

Abhira (अभिर).—1 A. (rarely P.)

1) To be pleased or delighted (with loc.); दृष्टिरिहाभिरमते हृदयं च (dṛṣṭirihābhiramate hṛdayaṃ ca) Mk.4,5.15; न गन्धहरिणो दमनककेदारिकायामभिरमति (na gandhahariṇo damanakakedārikāyāmabhiramati) Vb.3; Ratn.2, Y.1. 252.

2) To please or gratify oneself, take pleasure or delight in (with loc.); विद्यासु विद्वानिव सोऽभिरेमे (vidyāsu vidvāniva so'bhireme) Bk.1.9. -Caus. To gratify, please; मत्सपत्नीरभिरमयिष्यसि (matsapatnīrabhiramayiṣyasi) Dk.9,92,163.

Derivable forms: abhiram (अभिरम्).

--- OR ---

Abhīra (अभीर).—[abhimukhīkṛtya īrayati gāḥ, īr-ac]

1) A cowherd

2) Name of a pastora people; more usually written आभीर (ābhīra) q. v.

-rī The language of the अभीर (abhīra) people.

-ram Name of a metre, see आभीर (ābhīra).

Derivable forms: abhīraḥ (अभीरः).

--- OR ---

Ābhīra (आभीर).—[ā samantāt bhiyaṃ rāti, rā-ka Tv.]

1) A cowherd; आभीरवामनयनाहृतमानसाय दत्तं मनो यदुपते तदिदं गृहाण (ābhīravāmanayanāhṛtamānasāya dattaṃ mano yadupate tadidaṃ gṛhāṇa) Udb.; according to Ms.1.15 आभीर (ābhīra) is the offspring of a Brāhmaṇa and a female of the Ambaṣṭha tribe.

2) (pl.) Name of a country or its inhabitants; श्रीकोंकणा- दधोभागे तापीतः पश्चिमे तटे । आभीरदेशो देवेशि विन्ध्यशैले व्यवस्थितः (śrīkoṃkaṇā- dadhobhāge tāpītaḥ paścime taṭe | ābhīradeśo deveśi vindhyaśaile vyavasthitaḥ) ||

-rī 1 A cowherd's wife.

2) A woman of the Ābhīra tribe.

3) The language of the Ābhīras; आभीरेषु तथा- भीरी (ābhīreṣu tathā- bhīrī) (prayoktavyā) S. D.432.

Derivable forms: ābhīraḥ (आभीरः).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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