Yashodhara, aka: Yaśodharā, Yashas-dhara, Yaśodhara; 13 Definition(s)

Introduction

Yashodhara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Yaśodharā and Yaśodhara can be transliterated into English as Yasodhara or Yashodhara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Yashodhara in Purana glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

1) Yaśodhara (यशोधर).—Son of Durmukha, who fought on the side of the Pāṇḍavas against the Kauravas. (Mahābhārata, Droṇa Parva, Chapter 184, Verse 5).

2) Yaśodhara (यशोधर).—A son of Śrī Kṛṣṇa by Rukmiṇīdevī. (Mahābhārata Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 14, Verse 33).

3) Yaśodharā (यशोधरा).—Daughter of King Trigarta. She was married by Hasti, King of the Pūru dynasty and they a had a son named Vikaṇṭha. (Mahābhārata Ādi Parva, Chapter 95, Verse 35).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Yaśodharā (यशोधरा).—The wife Kanakapīṭha.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 11. 35.

1b) A daughter of Virocana and wife of Tvaṣṭā.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 187.

1c) A daughter of Devaka and one of the seven wives of Vasudeva.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 44. 73.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Yaśodharā (यशोधरा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.90.37). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Yaśodharā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of yashodhara or yasodhara in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Katha (narrative stories)

Yashodhara in Katha glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

1) Yaśodharā (यशोधरा) is the wife of Priyadarśana and mother of Kanakavarṣa according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 55. Accordingly, “... in that city [Kanakapura] there dwelt in old time a glorious king, named Kanakavarṣa, who was born to Priyadarśana, the son of Vāsuki, king of the snakes, by the Princess Yaśodharā. Though he bore the weight of the whole earth, he was adorned with innumerable virtues; he longed for glory, not for wealth; he feared sin, not his enemy”.

2) Yaśodhara (यशोधर) is one of the two twin-sons of Śrīdhara: a Brāhman from Mālava, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 63. Accordingly, “... there was a famous Brāhman in Mālava, named Śrīdhara, and twin sons, of like feature, were born to him. The elder was named Yaśodhara, and his younger brother was Lakṣmīdhara. And when they grew up, the two brothers set out together for a foreign country to study, with the approval of their father...”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Yaśodharā, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

Discover the meaning of yashodhara or yasodhara in the context of Katha from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Yashodhara in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

Yaśodharā (यशोधरा) is one of the two wifes of the Buddha according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XXVIII). Accordingly, “the Bodhisattva Śākyamuni had two wives: the first was called K’iu p’i ye (Gopiya or Gopā), the second Ye chou t’o lo (Yaśodharā) or Ye chou t’o lo heou lo mou (Yaśodharā Rāhulamātā). Gopā, being sterile (bandhya), had no children. Yaśodharā knew she was pregnant (garbhiṇī) the same night that the Bodhisattva left home (pravrajita). After his departure, the Bodhisattva practiced asceticism (duṣkaracaryā) for six years; Yaśodharā was pregnant also for six years without giving birth”.

Note: The wife of the Buddha, mother of Rāhula, is called called in the Pāli sources Rāhulamātā, Bhaddakaccā (Bhaddakaccānā) (Buddhavaṃsa XXVI.15; Mahāvaṃsa II.24), Yasodharā (Buddhavaṃsa Comm., p. 245), Bimbādevī (Jātaka II, p. 392; Sumaṅgala II, p. 422) and Bimbāsundarī (Jātaka VI, p. 478). She was born on the same day as the Buddha (Jātaka I, p. 54) and married him at the age of sixteen (Jātaka I, p. 58).

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of yashodhara or yasodhara in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Yashodhara in Theravada glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

1. Yasodhara. A king of fifty five kappas ago; a previous birth of Ukkhepakatavaccha (Ekatthambhika) Thera. ThagA.i.148; Ap.i.56.

2. Yasodhara. There were once seventy seven kings of this name, all previous births of Sona Kolivisa. ThagA.i.546; Ap.i.94.

3. Yasodhara. A brahmin, father of Subhadda, who became one of the chief disciples of Kondanna Buddha. BuA.110.

4. Yasodhara. A preacher in the time of Kassapa Buddha (SA.i.148). See Andhavana.

-- or --

1. Yasodhara. See Rahulamata.

2. Yasodhara. The daughter of the Treasurer of Sunandagama; she offered a meal of milk rice to Kondanna Buddha. BuA.108.

3. Yasodhara. Wife of the khattiya Yasava and mother of Anomadussi Buddha. J.i.36; DhA.i.105; Bu.viii.17; AA.i.85.

4. Yasodhara. Daughter of King Jayasena. She married Anjana the Sakiyan, and their children were Maya and Pajapati and Dandapani and Suppabuddha (Mhv.ii.16ff).

Yasodhara was the sister of Sihahanu. MT. 35; see also Mtu.i.355.

5. Yasodhara. Daughter of Vijayabahu I. and Lilavati. She married Viravamma and had two daughters, Lilavati and Sugala (Cv.lix.26). She was later raised to the rank of rajini (? queen) by Vijayabahu, and erected a massive building, called Pasadapada, in the Kappuramulayatana. Cv.lx.83.

6. Yasodhara. One of the chief women supporters of Sumedha Buddha. Bu.xii.25.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Discover the meaning of yashodhara or yasodhara in the context of Theravada from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

Yashodhara in Buddhism glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »
the wife of Siddhartha Goutama. She later became a Bhikhuni.Source: Buddhist Door: Glossary

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Yashodhara in Jainism glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

Yaśodharā (यशोधरा) is the wife of Sīmandhara, who is a kulakara (law-giver) according to Digambara sources. The kulakaras (similair to the manus of the Brahmanical tradition) figure as important characters protecting and guiding humanity towards prosperity during ancient times of distress, whenever the kalpavṛkṣa (wishing tree) failed to provide the proper service.

These law-givers and their wifes (eg., Yaśodharā) are listed in various Jain sources, such as the Bhagavatīsūtra and Jambūdvīpaprajñapti in Śvetāmbara, or the Tiloyapaṇṇatti and Ādipurāṇa in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Yaśodhara (यशोधर) is one of the nine graiveyakas: a subclasses of kalpātītas (born beyond heaven), itself a division of empyrean celestial beings (vaimānika) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 4.19. The living beings residing in the vimānas are called the empyrean gods (vaimānika) and represents one of the four classes of Devas.

The nava-graiveyakas (eg., Yaśodhara) are the three layered residences above the sixteenth heaven (kalpa) where Ahamindra deities reside. Which thought-colourations are there in Graivaiyaka, Anudiśa and Anuttara gods? They have pure white thought-colouration.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 4: The celestial beings (deva)
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of yashodhara or yasodhara in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geogprahy

Yaśodhara (यशोधर) is the father of Ramāpati Upādhyāya (before 1704 C.E.): author of the Vṛttasāra and an auto commentary called Āloka on it. Ramāpati was the disciple and the son of Yaśodhara and grandson of Śrīharīśa. He tells the magnanimity of his father and grandfather that his grandfather was a famous scholar in Kāśī and he was entrusted with the title Pājjikāmbhoja. His father, Yaśodhara, was described as the crest of gem of scholars (paṇḍitaśekhara) on the earth and also was adorned with the title of pāñjikārāja. He mentions in the beginning of the text that he was the disciple of Yaśodhara and at the end introduces himself as the son of Yaśodhara. Therefore Yaśodhara was his preceptor as well as father. He beautifully presents the nobility of his family.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of yashodhara or yasodhara in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Yashodhara in Pali glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

yasodhara : (adj.) famous.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of yashodhara or yasodhara in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Yashodhara in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

Yaśodhara (यशोधर).—a. (yaśodhara) keeping up or preserving glory.

Yaśodhara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms yaśas and dhara (धर).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Yaśodharā (यशोधरा).—(1) (= Pali Yaso°) n. of the wife of Śākyamuni as Bodhisattva (see also Yaśovatī, Yaśavatī, Gopā): Mvy 1070; Mv ii.25.12 (birth); 48.7 (meets the Bodhisattva); 69.2 ff. (rejects Devadatta); 72.18 ff. (coquets with the Bodhisattva); 73.5 ff. (requested in marriage; her father first refuses); 135.13 (her dream); previous incarna- tions, Mv i.128.13; ii.64.4; 67.11, 16 (other refs. in Mv, see Index); Divy 253.26; enlightenment predicted SP 269.6 ff.; mentioned also SP 2.10; (2) n. of a devakumārikā in the south: Mv iii.307.8 = LV 389.7.

--- OR ---

Yaśodharā (यशोधरा) or Yaśovatī.—1, Śākyamuni's wife: LV 95.9 (prose, no v.l.). Cf. also Yaśavatī (m.c.?).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of yashodhara or yasodhara in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 790 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shridhara
Śrīdhara (श्रीधर).—Another important commentary on Praśastapāda’s Bhāṣya is Nyāyakaṇḍalī writte...
Mahidhara
Mahīdhara (महीधर).—n. of a minister: Divy 318.18 ff.; previous birth of Maudgalyāyana, 328.15&m...
Vidyadhara
Vidyādhara (विद्याधर).—(= Pali vijjādhara; in Sanskrit seems to be used only of the supernatura...
Dhara
1) Dharā (धरा) refers to “earth” and is mentioned in a list of 53 synonyms for dharaṇi (“earth”...
Yasa
Yaśa (यश).—see Yaśas.
Dharadhara
Dharādhara (धराधर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. A name of Vishnu. 2. A mountain. E. dharā the earth, and dhara...
Yashoda
Yaśoda (यशोद).—m. (-daḥ) Quicksilver.
Payodhara
Payodhara (पयोधर).—m. (-raḥ) A woman’s breast. 2. A cloud. 3. The sugarcane. 4. The cocoanut. 5...
Vasudhara
Vasudhārā (वसुधारा).—f. (-rā) 1. A female Sakti peculiar to the Jainas. 2. The capital of Kuver...
Durdhara
Durdhara (दुर्धर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rā-raṃ) 1. Difficult to be sustained or borne, troublesome, unbea...
Tuladhara
Tulādhara (तुलाधर).—m. (-raḥ) The sun. E. tulā the sign, and dhara who has or possesses. tulāyā...
Dharanidhara
Dharaṇidhara (धरणिधर).—m. (-raḥ) A name of Vishnu. E. dharaṇi the earth and dhara who sustains;...
Gangadhara
Gaṅgādhara (गङ्गाधर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. An epithet of Siva. 2. The ocean. E. gaṅgā the Ganges, and d...
Sutradhara
Sūtradhāra.—(EI 24; CII 4; BL), a mason; an artisan; an epithet generally applied to the engrav...
Bhudhara
Bhūdhara (भूधर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. A mountain. 2. A kind of chemical or medicinal apparatus; a sand ...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: