Talavana, aka: Tālavana, Tala-vana; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Talavana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Talavana in Purana glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

1) Tālavana (तालवन).—An ancient place of Dakṣiṇa Bhārata. This place was conquered by Sahadeva. (Śloka 61, Chapter 31, Sabhā Parva).

2) Tālavana (तालवन).—A garden on the side of the mountain of Latāveṣṭa near Dvāraka. (Chapter 38, Sabhā Parva).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Tālavana (तालवन).—A grove of palms near Brindāvana where lived the demon Dhenuka who was killed by Rāma and Kṛṣṇa.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 8. 1-3; 9. 1.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Talavana (तलवन) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.28.48) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Tala-vana) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Talavana in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Tālavana (तालवन)—One of the seven forests on the western bank of the Yamunā.

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Talavana in Theravada glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

See Nalapana ??.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Talavana in Marathi glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

taḷavaṇa (तळवण).—f (taḷaṇēṃ) Anything fried, a fry.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

taḷavaṇa (तळवण).—f Any thing fried, a fry.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Talavana in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Tālavana (तालवन).—a grove of trees.

Derivable forms: tālavanam (तालवनम्).

Tālavana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tāla and vana (वन).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1765 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Bhavana
Bhavana (भवन).—n. of a mountain: Kv 91.16.--- OR --- Bhāvana (भावन).—(?) (= Sanskrit °nā?), in...
Tala
Tala (तल).—n. (-laṃ) 1. Essential nature, (in composition especially, as mahītalaṃ the earth it...
Vana
Vana (वन).—nf. (-naṃ-nī) A forest, a wood, a grove. n. (-naṃ) 1. Water. 2. A residence, a dwell...
Nirvana
Nirvaṇa (निर्वण) or Nirvvaṇa.—mfn. (-ṇaḥ-ṇā-ṇaṃ) Bare, open, (a country) E. nir neg. vana a woo...
Vanaprastha
Vanaprastha (वनप्रस्थ).—n. (-sthaṃ) A wood situated on table land.--- OR --- Vānaprastha (वानप्...
Talatala
Talātala (तलातल).—the fourth of the seven divisions of hell; Bhāg.2.5.41. Derivable forms: talā...
Rasatala
Rasātala (रसातल).—n. (-laṃ) 1. Patala; the seven infernal regions under the earth, and the resi...
Vrindavana
Vṛndāvana (वृन्दावन) is the son of Kālīsahāya and the grandson of Durgāsahāya (C. 1775-185...
Nagavana
Nāgavana (नागवन) is the name of a forest situated in Majjhimadesa (Middle Country) of ancient I...
Haritala
Haritāla (हरिताल).—n. (-laṃ) Yellow orpiment. f. (-lī) 1. Bent grass, (Panicum dactylon.) 2. A ...
Mahavana
Mahāvana (महावन).—n. (-naṃ) A large forest. E. mahā large, vana a wood.
Vanamala
Vanamālā (वनमाला).—a garland of wood-flowers, such as was usually worn by Kṛṣṇa; ग्रथितमौलिरसौ ...
Tapovana
Tapovana is the name of a locality  mentioned in the “Plate of Lalitaśūradeva” (853-8...
Mahatala
Mahātala (महातल).—A section of Pātāla. The descendants of the serpent Kadrū live here. These se...
Sutala
Sutala (सुतल).—A part of Pātāla (netherworld). (See under Pātāla).

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