Siddharthaka, Siddhārthaka, Siddha-arthaka: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Siddharthaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Siddharthaka in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Siddhārthaka (सिद्धार्थक) refers to a type of curative bath. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā.

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Siddhārthaka (सिद्धार्थक) refers to “mustard” and is mentioned in a list of potential causes for indigestion in the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., siddhārthaka (mustard)]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., khadira (Acacia catechu)] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Siddhārthaka (mustard) is also mentioned as a remedy for indigestion caused by bījapūra (citron) or pālāṅkika or ākambuka (wintercherry) or kāravallī (bitter gourd) or vārtāka (brinjal) or vaṃśāṅkura (bamboo sprout) or mūlaka (radish) or upodakā (Basella alba) or ālābu (pumpkin gourd) or paṭola (small cucumber) or megharasa (rain water).

Source: Asian Agri-History: Paśu Āyurvēda (Veterinary Medicine) in Garuḍapurāṇa

Siddhārthaka (सिद्धार्थक) refers to “white mustard seeds”, and is used in the treatment of elephants (Gajāyurveda or Hastyāyurveda), according to the Garuḍapurāṇa.—The prophylactic, or curative rites, in respect of the upasarga (epidemics out break) among elephants is by means of a śāntikarma (pacifying rite), the worship of Gods and Brahmins and the gift of a kapilā (pale-brown or tawny) cow. A physician while observing a fast shall tie garland of vacā (sweet flag), siddhārthaka (white mustard seeds) around the tusks of an elephant for protecting from attacks of diseases. [...]

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Siddharthaka in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Siddhārthaka (सिद्धार्थक) refers to “white mustard”, forming part of a common diet in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa verse 423.—Most of the references to the articles of diet occur in the Nīlamata in connection with the offerings made to the gods but it is not difficult to infer from them the food and drink of the common people because “what a man eats his gods eat”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Siddharthaka in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Siddhārthaka (सिद्धार्थक) refers to “white mustard seed”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 226).—There are apparently several Tantric rites that Bāṇa pejoratively associates with the priest: [...] “his collection of practices for mastering mantras for invisibility had grown”; “he was acquainted with a hundred tales about the marvels of the Śrīparvata mountain”; “his ear-cavities were punched by those possessed by Piśāca-demons, who had run to him when struck by white mustard seed (siddhārthaka) he had empowered with mantras more than once”.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Siddharthaka in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Siddhārthaka (सिद्धार्थक) refers to “white mustard”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 15.4cd-7ab, while describing protection rituals]—“Since all Rakṣasas run away and are killed, then O Devi, I call [white mustard seeds] rakṣoghna. They spread on Earth and in all battles between demons and the chiefs of gods. [Mustard seeds] are employed as killers of villains in order to accomplish (siddhi) the destruction of enemies. Since their purpose is accomplished then they are called white mustard (siddhārthaka) on Earth. They take away pride in evil-minded spirits”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Siddharthaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Siddhārthaka (सिद्धार्थक).—White mustard; Dk..2.7.

-kam A kind of ointment.

Derivable forms: siddhārthakaḥ (सिद्धार्थकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Siddhārthaka (सिद्धार्थक):—[from siddha > sidh] m. white mustard (exceptionally also n.), [Suśruta; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] Name of two officials, [Mudrārākṣasa]

3) [v.s. ...] n. a kind of ointment, [Suśruta]

[Sanskrit to German]

Siddharthaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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