Bijapura, Bījapūra, Bija-pura: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bijapura means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Bījapūra (बीजपूर) is a sanskrit technical term translating to “Iron pan”. It is used throughout Rasaśāstra literature, such as the Rasaprakāśasudhākara.

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Bījapūra (बीजपूर) refers to the “citron” and is mentioned in a list of potential causes for indigestion in the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., bījapūra (citron)]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., bakula fruit (Mimusops elengi) and siddhārthaka (mustard)] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Bījapūra (बीजपूर) refers to the medicinal plant known as “Citrus medica Linn.” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning bījapūra] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: BDK Tripiṭaka: The Susiddhikara-sūtra

Bījapūra (बीजपूर) or bījapūraka refers to the “citron fruit”, as mentioned in Chapter 12 (“offering food”) of the Susiddhikara-sūtra. Accordingly, “if among the offering rites you see one with ‘śāntika food,’ use svastika cakes, milk gruel, parched rice, ghee, honey, and milk dishes of barley cooked with milk, and bījapūra (citron): you will assuredly be able to eliminate calamities—of this you should have no doubts”.

When you wish to offer food [viz., bījapūra], first cleanse the ground, sprinkle scented water all around, spread out on the ground leaves that have been washed clean, such as lotus leaves, palāśa (dhak) leaves, and leaves from lactescent trees, or new cotton cloth, and then set down the oblatory dishes. [...] First smear and sprinkle the ground and then spread the leaves; wash your hands clean, rinse out your mouth several times, swallow some water, and then you should set down the food [viz., bījapūra]. [...]

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Mahajana: A Dictionary Of Chinese Buddhist Terms

Bījapūra, or bījapūraka; (倶緣果) is described as a citron. (Monier Williams:—) A fruit held in one of the hands of Kunti Guanyin.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bījapūra (बीजपूर).—the citron tree.

-ram, -rakam the fruit of citron. -utkṛṣṭam good seed; abīja- vikrayī caiva bījotkṛṣṭaṃ tathaiva ca Ms.9.291. -udakam hail. -uptiḥ f. sowing seed. °cakram a kind of astrological diagram for indicating good or bad luck following on the sowing of seed. -kartṛ m. an epithet of Śiva. -kṛt a. producing semen. (-n.) an aphrodisiac.

Derivable forms: bījapūraḥ (बीजपूरः).

Bījapūra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms bīja and pūra (पूर). See also (synonyms): bījāḍhya, bījapūraka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bījapūra (बीजपूर).—[masculine] the citron-tree; [neuter] a citron.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bījapura (बीजपुर):—[=bīja-pura] [from bīja] [wrong reading] for -pūra.

2) Bījapūra (बीजपूर):—[=bīja-pūra] [from bīja] a m. ([Suśruta]) ‘seed-filled’, a citron, Citrus Medica

3) [=bīja-pūra] [from bīja-pūrṇa > bīja] b n. a citron, [Kathāsaritsāgara]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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