Siddhasantana, Siddhasaṃtāna, Siddhasantāna, Siddha-santana: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Siddhasantana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Siddhasantana in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Siddhasantāna (सिद्धसन्तान) refers to the “tradition of the Siddhas”.—The ‘previous tradition’ (pūrvasantāna) is that of the Siddhas. [...] The ‘earlier portion’ is the previous Kaula tradition established by Matsyendranātha. The god revealed this, the ‘tradition of the Siddhas’ (siddhasantāna) previously to the goddess. [...] The ‘previous tradition’ (pūrvasantāna) is variously represented and incorporated into the Kubjikā Tantras and Matsyendranātha is credited, as he is in other contemporary Kaula traditions such as the Kālīkula and the Kashmiri Trikakula, with being the Siddha who originally revealed the Kula modality of Tantrism.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Siddhasantana in Shaivism glossary
Source: eScholarship: The role of religious experience in the traditions of Tantric Shaivism

Siddhasantāna (सिद्धसन्तान) refers to the “lineages of perfected masters”.—[...] Kulamārga is a name occasionally found in the primary sources,to maintain a consistency with the names of the other two streams. The Kulamārga, then (based as it is in the Somasiddhānta branch of the Atimārga; see below), is distinguished by the following characteristics: [... worship of siddha-santānas (lineages of perfected masters); ...]. Despite the transgressive character of this list, the Kulamārga was not only practiced by marginal elements of society, but also found a place at its pinnacle, that of the royal court, in which context it existed in a refined aestheticized form.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Siddhasaṃtāna (सिद्धसंतान) refers to the “tradition of the Siddhas”, according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “After this, O Śivā, hear the exposition of the Kula Conduct. After he has joined the tradition of the Siddhas (siddhasaṃtāna), he should worship his guru as divine. The Yogin who is engaged in the worship of his guru can obtain the highest Power (siddhi). The guru’s bedstead, his bedding, clothes, ornaments, sandals, parasol, antilope-skin, bowl or anything else: if he touches any of these with his feet, he should place them on his head and recite [mantras] eight times. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of siddhasantana or siddhasamtana in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

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