Sharvari, Śarvarī, Sarvarī, Sārvari: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Sharvari means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śarvarī can be transliterated into English as Sarvari or Sharvari, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sharvari in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Śarvarī (शर्वरी).—The wife of Doṣa, a Vasu: their son is Siṃsumāra.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 6. 14.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Arcana-dipika - 3rd Edition

Sārvari (सार्वरि) is the thirty-fourth of sixty years (saṃvatsara) in the Vedic lunar calendar according to the Arcana-dīpikā by Vāmana Mahārāja (cf. Appendix).—Accordingl, There are sixty different names for each year in the Vedic lunar calendar, which begins on the new moon day (Amāvasyā) after the appearance day of Śrī Caitanya Mahāprabhu (Gaura-pūrṇimā), in February or March. The Vedic year [viz., Sārvari], therefore, does not correspond exactly with the Christian solar calendar year.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (vaishnavism)

Śarvarī (शर्वरी) refers to the “(illusionary) darkness” (of those with distorted views), according to the Vedānta Deśika’s Yatirājasaptati.—When we come to the poem’s understanding of the divinity of Rāmānuja we find a wide spectrum of meanings. [...] Verse 28 is particularly eloquent in describing and encapsulating all his nurturing and protecting qualities, which are compared to those present everywhere in nature itself—as the mountain from which originate all the streams of knowledge, the tree under which the weary traveler wandering in saṃsāra takes rest, the rising sun that keeps the illusionary darkness (māyā-śarvarī) of those with distorted views at bay and the full moon that brings to high tide the ocean of the Vedas.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Śarvarī (शर्वरी) refers to the thirty-fourth of the sixty-year cycle of Jupiter, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 8), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The years of the seventh yuga are—1. Hemalamba, 2. Vilambi, 3. Vikāri, 4. Śarvarī and 5. Plava. In the first of these years crops will generally be injured and there will be storm and rain; in the second year crops will not grow in abundance and the rainfall will not be much; in the third year mankind will be afflicted with fears and there will be much rain; in the fourth year there will be famine; in Plava, the fifth year, there will be prosperity in the land and also much rain”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: 84000: Sampuṭodbhava Tantra (Emergence from Sampuṭa)

Śarvarī (शर्वरी) refers to one of the primary thirty-two energy-channels in the body, according to the Sampuṭodbhavatantra chapter 1.—Accordingly, “[Vajragarbha asked, ‘What subtle energy channels are in the body?’]—The Blessed One said, ‘There are one hundred and twenty of them, corresponding to the divisions within the four cakras. The chief ones, those with bodhicitta as their innate nature, are thirty-two in number. They are: [i.e., Śarvarī] [...]’.”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śarvarī (शर्वरी).—[śṝ-vanip ṅīp vano ra ca]

1) A night; शशिनं पुनरेति शर्वरी (śaśinaṃ punareti śarvarī) R.8.56;3.2;11.93; Śi.11.5.

2) Evening, twilight.

3) Turmeric.

4) A woman.

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Sarvarī (सर्वरी).—See शर्वरी (śarvarī).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śarvarī (शर्वरी) or Śarvvarī.—f. (-rī) 1. Night. 2. A woman. 3. Turmeric. E. śṝ to injure, aran Unadi aff.; or śṝ-vanip ṅīp vano ra ca .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śarvarī (शर्वरी).—i. e. śṛ10 + van + ī, (with r for n, cf. śaru), f. 1. Night, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 66. 2. A woman. 3. Turmeric.

— Cf. probably as akin,

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śarvarī (शर्वरी):—[from śarvara] a f. See below

2) [from śarvara] b f. the (star-spangled) night, [Ṛg-veda]

3) [v.s. ...] evening, twilight, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] turmeric or Curcuma Longa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a woman, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of the wife of Doṣa and mother of Śiśu-māra, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

7) [v.s. ...] [plural] the spotted steeds of the Maruts, [Ṛg-veda]

8) Śārvarī (शार्वरी):—mf(ī)n. ([from] śarvarī) belonging to night, nocturnal, [Kādambarī; Harṣacarita; Vāsavadattā]

9) pernicious, murderous, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) f. night, [Vikramāṅkadeva-carita, by Bilhaṇa; Śārṅgadhara-paddhati]

11) n. ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] also m.) darkness, gloom, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

12) Sarvarī (सर्वरी):—[wrong reading] for śarvare q.v.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śarvarī (शर्वरी):—(rī) 3. f. Night; woman; turmeric.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Śarvarī (शर्वरी) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Savvarī.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sharvari in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Śarvarī (शर्वरी):—(nf) night; ~[śa] the moon.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śarvari (ಶರ್ವರಿ):—

1) [noun] a starry night.

2) [noun] evening time or twilight.

3) [noun] the powder of its rhizome used in medicine and also for seasoning the food; turmeric powder.

4) [noun] a woman (in gen.).

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Śārvari (ಶಾರ್ವರಿ):—

1) [noun] a pitch dark-night.

2) [noun] name of a goddess.

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Śārvari (ಶಾರ್ವರಿ):—[noun] name of the thirty fourth year in the Hindu cycle of sixty years.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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