Sharirin, Śarīrī, Śarīrin, Shariri: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Sharirin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śarīrī and Śarīrin can be transliterated into English as Sariri or Shariri or Saririn or Sharirin, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्) refers to “embodied beings”, according to the Kularatnapañcakāvatāra verse 1.23cd-33ab.—Accordingly, “[...] Whatever is visible or invisible to embodied beings (śarīrin) in the three worlds is all, O goddess, certainly Kaula, the cause of union (with the absolute). O goddess, the ten-fold divine source (of phenomena, that is, the above nine and Kaula) is the fourfold womb (of the four kinds of living beings). They arise and dissolve away in Kaula. (All that) moves and is immobile, the triple world with (all) that moves and does not is born from Kula and comes from Akula. O beloved, that is said to be Kaula”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Sharirin in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्) refers to “embodied creatures” or the “soul”, according to Kālidāsa’s Raghuvaṃśa verse 8.88-90.—Accordingly: “The wise say that death is the natural state of embodied creatures (śarīrin) and life is a change in that state. If a being remains breathing even for a moment it is surely fortunate. The foolish man regards the loss of his dear one as a dart shot into his heart. Another man looks on the same as a dart that has been pulled out, for it is a door to beatitude. When we are taught that our own body and soul (śarīrin) unite and then separate, tell me which wise person should be tormented by separation from the external objects of the senses?”.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्) refers to “one having a body”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 21.2-5]—“[...] An action of [one who is] bodiless cannot be seen, O Parameśvara. When having a body (śarīrin) [results in a condition] in all living beings of [being] bound, how does the agency of the bound [individual] contradict those agents [who are] devoid of power? Thus, [because] mantras consist of the nature of Śiva, how do they actually accomplish [anything]?”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Śarīrī (शरीरी) is a Sanskrit word referring to the soul (owner of the body).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्) refers to “humans” or “embodied souls”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “That [meditation] is divided into two [types] according to whether it has an auspicious or inauspicious purpose [and] for humans it is the real cause (śarīrinbījabhūtaṃ śarīriṇām) of obtaining desirable and undesirable results”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Śarīrī (शरीरी).—m S A corporeal being; a living creature having a body.

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śarīrī (शरीरी).—a (S) Embodied. 2 Relating to the body, corporeal.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Śarīrī (शरीरी).—a Embodied; corporeal. m A corporeal being.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्).—a. (-ṇī f.)

1) Embodied, corporeal, incarnate; परलोकं नयत्याशु भास्वन्तं खशरीरिणम् (paralokaṃ nayatyāśu bhāsvantaṃ khaśarīriṇam) Manusmṛti 4.243; करुणस्य मूर्तिरथवा शरीरिणी विरहव्यथैव वनमेति जानकी (karuṇasya mūrtirathavā śarīriṇī virahavyathaiva vanameti jānakī) Uttararāmacarita 3.4; भावाविव शरीरिणौ (bhāvāviva śarīriṇau) M.1.1.

2) Living. -m.

1) Anything endowed with a body (whether animate or inanimate); शरीरिणां स्थावरजङ्गमानां सुखाय तज्जन्मदिनं बभूव (śarīriṇāṃ sthāvarajaṅgamānāṃ sukhāya tajjanmadinaṃ babhūva) Kumārasambhava 1.23; मरणं प्रकृतिः शरीरिणाम् (maraṇaṃ prakṛtiḥ śarīriṇām) R.8.87,43.

2) A sentient being.

3) A man.

4) The soul (clad with the body); स्वशरीरशरीरिणावपि श्रुतसंयोगविपर्ययौ यदा (svaśarīraśarīriṇāvapi śrutasaṃyogaviparyayau yadā) R.8.89; अन्तवन्त इमे देहा नित्यस्योक्ताः शरीरिणः (antavanta ime dehā nityasyoktāḥ śarīriṇaḥ) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 2.18.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्).—mfn. (-ri-riṇī-ri) Embodied, corporeal, having body. m. (-rī) An animal or sentiment being. n. (-ri) Life or soul connected with the body, or incorporate. E. śarīra the body and ini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्).—i. e. śarīra + in, I. adj., f. riṇī. 1. Embodied, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 53, 12. 2. Living, Chr. 20, 20 (nahi vāṇā mayotsṛṣṭāḥ sajjanti śarīriṇāṃ kāyeṣu, For the arrows which I have shot do not stick in the bodies of living beings, i. e. all I. hit with my arrows must die). Ii. m. 1. A sentient being, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 20; [Pañcatantra] iii. [distich] 90; a man, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 107. 2. An embodied spirit, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 53; 6, 64. 3. The soul, [Bhagavadgītā, (ed. Schlegel.)] 2, 18; Bhāṣāp. 26.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्).—[adjective] having a body or having (—°) for body; [masculine] living creature, man, soul.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śarīrin (शरीरिन्):—[from śarīra] mfn. having a body, embodied, corporeal, [Manu-smṛti; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) having anything as a body, [Manu-smṛti iv, 243] (cf. kha-s)

3) [v.s. ...] covered with bodies, [Mahābhārata]

4) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) exercising one’s own b°, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] living, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

6) [v.s. ...] m. an embodied being, creature, ([especially]) a man, [Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata] etc.

7) [v.s. ...] m. the soul, [Bhagavad-gītā; Raghuvaṃśa] etc. (n., [Horace H. Wilson])

8) [v.s. ...] m. an embodied spirit, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्):—[(rī-riṇī-ri) m.] An animal or sentient being. n. Life, soul. a. Having a body.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Śarīrin (शरीरिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Sarīri.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sharirin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sharirin in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Śarīrī (शरीरी):—(a) physical, corporeal; concrete; (nm) an organism.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Sarīri (सरीरि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Śarīrin.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śarīri (ಶರೀರಿ):—

1) [noun] that which has a physical body, as a human being, animal, etc.

2) [noun] the soul or the inner principle, which is housed in the body.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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