Pinga, Piṅgā, Piṅga: 12 definitions

Introduction

Pinga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Piṅgā (पिङ्गा) is another name for Balāka, which is a Sanskrit word referring to Pavonia odorata (fragement mallow plant), from the Malvaceae family. It is classified as a medicinal plant in the system of Āyurveda (science of Indian medicine) and is used throughout literature such as the Suśrutasaṃhita and the Carakasaṃhitā.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Piṅga (पिङ्ग).—A madhyamādhvaryu.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 33. 16.

1b) Tripravara.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 196. 33.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Piṅga (पिङ्ग) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Piṅga] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Piṅga, see piṅka. (Page 457)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

piṅgā (पिंगा) [or पिंगारा, piṅgārā].—m A certain feat accompanied by the shouting of this word at girls' play.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

piṅgā (पिंगा) [-piṅgārā, -पिंगारा].—m A kind of girls' play.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Piṅga (पिङ्ग).—a. [piñj-varṇe añca nyaṅkva °kutvam] Reddish-brown, tawny, yellow-red; अन्तर्निविष्टामलपिङ्गतारम् (antarniviṣṭāmalapiṅgatāram) (vilocanam) Ku. 7.33; Bhāg.4.5.13; Mv.5.44.

-ṅgaḥ 1 The tawny colour.

2) A buffalo.

3) A rat.

-ṅgā 1 Turmeric.

2) Saffron.

3) A kind of yellow pigment.

4) An epithet of Durgā.

5) A bow-string.

6) A tubular vessel of the human body which according to the Yoga system is the channel of respiration and circulation for one side.

-ṅgam A young animal.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Piṅga (पिङ्ग).—(m.; in one Sanskrit Lex. said to mean buffalo), young (male) elephant, parallel with kareṇu, as in prec. line kiśora, male colt, with vaḍavā: pañca kareṇu-sahasrāṇi pañca piṅga-sahasrāṇi Lalitavistara 95.11 (prose; vv.ll. kapiṅga-, piśa-); confirmed in Tibetan, ba laṅ gi phrug gu pho, (usually bullock but also) young male elephant (for kareṇu Tibetan has the same phrase with mo, female, instead of pho, male).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piṅga (पिङ्ग).—mfn.

(-ṅgaḥ-ṅgā-ṅgaṃ) Of a tawny colour. m.

(-ṅgaḥ) 1. Tawny, (the colour. 2. A rat. 3. A buffalo. n.

(-ṅgaṃ) A young animal. f.

(-ṅgā) 1. A yellow dye: see gorocanā. 2. Asafœtida. 3. A tubular vessel of the body, which according to the Yoya system, is the channel of respiration and circulation for one side. 4. A name of Durga. 5. Turmeric. 6. Bamboo manna. f. (-ṅgī) A sort of Mimosa, (M. suma, Rox.) E. piji to colour, aff. ac; or piṅga tawny, aff. ṭāp, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piṅga (पिङ्ग).—i. e. piñj + a, adj., f. . 1. Of a tawny colour, [Pañcatantra] 182, 18. 2. Yellow, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 157. 3. Red, [Hiḍimbavadha] 2, 2 (cf. piṅgākṣa).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Piṅga (पिङ्ग).—[adjective] reddish brown, tawny; [masculine] a man’s name.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Piṅga (पिङ्ग):—a piṅgara, piṅgala See under √piñj, [column]3.

2) [from piñj] b mf(ā)n. yellow, reddish-brown, tawny, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc. (cf. [gana] kaḍārādi)

3) [v.s. ...] m. yellow (the colour), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a buffalo, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] : a mouse, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of one of the sun’s attendants, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] of a man, [Āśvalāyana-śrauta-sūtra] (cf. paiṅgi, gin)

7) [v.s. ...] (piṅga, in one place pinga), Name of a kind of divine being (?), [Atharva-veda viii, 6, 6; 18 etc.]

8) Piṅgā (पिङ्गा):—[from piṅga > piñj] f. a bow-string, [Ṛg-veda viii, 58, 9] ([Sāyaṇa]; cf. piṅgala-jya)

9) [v.s. ...] a kind of yellow pigment (cf. go-rocanā)

10) [v.s. ...] the stalk of Ferula Asa Foetida, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] turmeric, Indian saffron, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] bamboo manna, [Horace H. Wilson]

13) [v.s. ...] Name of a woman, [Mahābhārata]

14) [v.s. ...] of Durgā, [Horace H. Wilson]

15) [v.s. ...] a tubular vessel of the human body which according to the Yoga system is the channel of respiration and circulation for one side, [ib.]

16) Piṅga (पिङ्ग):—[from piñj] n. orpiment, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) [v.s. ...] a young animal, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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