Pingaksha, aka: Piṅgākṣa, Pinga-aksha; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Pingaksha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Piṅgākṣa can be transliterated into English as Pingaksa or Pingaksha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Pingaksha in Purana glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Piṅgākṣa (पिङ्गाक्ष).—See under Durmukha.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Piṅgākṣa (पिङ्गाक्ष).—A Yakṣa; a son of Puṇyajanī and Maṇibhadra.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 123.

1b) A son of Lāngalī, an avatār of the Lord.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 23. 200.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Piṅgākṣa (पिङ्गाक्ष) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.96, IX.44.99, IX.44.100) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Piṅgākṣa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Pingaksha in Katha glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Piṅgākṣa (पिङ्गाक्ष) is the name of a Daitya who participated in the war between the Asuras and the Devas, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 115. Accordingly, “... then Vidyuddhvaja arrived, and there took place between those two armies a great battle, in which it was difficult to distinguish between friend and foe. [...] and Piṅgākṣa and his followers [fought] with the gods of wealth (Kuberas) [...]”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Piṅgākṣa, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pingaksha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Piṅgākṣa (पिङ्गाक्ष).—a. having reddish-brown eyes, red-eyed; विद्युद्विस्पष्टपिङ्गाक्षः (vidyudvispaṣṭapiṅgākṣaḥ) Mb.1. 23.7. (-kṣaḥ) 1 an ape.

2) an epithet of Śiva.

Piṅgākṣa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms piṅga and akṣa (अक्ष).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Piṅgākṣa (पिङ्गाक्ष).—mfn.

(-kṣaḥ-kṣī-kṣaṃ) Red-eyed. m. (kṣaḥ) A name of Siva. E. piṅga reddish brown, and akṣa an eye.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 186 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Lohitaksha
Lohitākṣa (लोहिताक्ष).—red-eye, (1) (n. of a gem, not in Sanskrit dictionaries, but occurs in P...
Virupaksha
Virūpākṣa (विरूपाक्ष) is the name of a Yakṣa who, due to Kubera’s curse, was born on the earth ...
Akshamala
Akṣamālā (अक्षमाला, “prayer beads”) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “acce...
Aksha
Akṣa (अक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. A die, cubic or oblong, for playing with. 2. Part of a car. 3. A whe...
Pinga
Piṅga (पिङ्ग).—mfn. (-ṅgaḥ-ṅgā-ṅgaṃ) Of a tawny colour. m. (-ṅgaḥ) 1. Tawny, (the colour. 2. A ...
Pundarikaksha
Puṇḍarīkākṣa (पुण्डरीकाक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) A name of Vishnu. n. (-kṣaṃ) A drug. E. puṇḍarīka a lot...
Hiranyaksha
Hiraṇyākṣa (हिरण्याक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) The name of a demon, killed by Vishnu. E. hiraṇya, and akṣa...
Gavaksha
Gavākṣa (गवाक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. An air hole, a loop hole, a round window, a bull’s eye, &c....
Ekaksha
Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣā-kṣaṃ) One-eyed. m. (-kṣaḥ) A crow. E. eka and akṣi an eye.
Vishalaksha
Viśālākṣa (विशालाक्ष).—(1) n. of a disciple of Buddha: Mv i.183.1; (2) n. of a yakṣa: Māy 51.
Sahasraksha
Sahasrākṣa (सहस्राक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣī-kṣaṃ) Thousand-eyed; used figuratively, vigilant, all-p...
Kamalaksha
Kamalākṣa (कमलाक्ष).—n. of a former Buddha: Mv i.137.7.
Tryaksha
Tryakṣa (त्र्यक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣī-kṣaṃ) Tri-ocular. m. (-kṣaḥ) A name of Siva. E. tri three, ...
Raktaksha
Raktākṣa (रक्ताक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣī-kṣa) Red-eyed. m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. A buffalo. 2. A pigeon. 3. Th...
Rudraksha
Rudrākṣa (रुद्राक्ष).—(Elaco Carpus seeds) Beads for rosaries. General information. A holy thin...

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