Musala, aka: Mushala, Muśala; 16 Definition(s)

Introduction

Musala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Muśala can be transliterated into English as Musala or Mushala, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Musala in Purana glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Musala (मुसल):—A weapon of Śeṣa; to exterminate all the Yādavas by the curse of sages; came out of Sāmba’s womb which was powdered and thrown into the sea; a piece was devoured by a fish, and a hunter who got it, shot it against Kṛṣṇa sitting, little knowing that he was the Lord; it was the cause of the Lord departing to heaven; other pieces became kuśa grass whih became in the hands of the Yādavas iron sticks with which they struck one another and died.

Source: Google Books: The Purana Index

Musala (मुसल).—A Brahmavādī son of Viśvāmitra. (Śloka 53, Chapter 4, Anuśāsana Parva).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Musala (मुसल).—Diti not to sit on, in her pregnancy.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 7. 38.

1b) A weapon of Śeṣa;1 to exterminate all the Yādavas by the curse of sages; came out of Sāmba's womb which was powdered and thrown into the sea; a piece was devoured by a fish, and a hunter who got it, shot it against Kṛṣṇa sitting, little knowing that he was the Lord; it was the cause of the Lord departing to heaven; other pieces became kuśa grass which became in the hands of the Yādavas iron sticks with which they struck one another and died.2

  • 1) Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 5. 18; V. 36, 13, 18; 37. 9.
  • 2) Ib. V. 37. 11-16; 44-5; 33. 30.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Musala (मुसल) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIII.4.52, XIII.4) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Musala) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Musala is the name of the Indian woon pestle, which is an ordinary cylindrical rod of hard wood. There is no scope for the introduction of various shapes in relation to this plain weapon, and consequently it has remained unaltered in its form from early times.

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Musala (मुसल, “pestle”).—According to mythology, hala and musala are the original weapons of Ananta. They are also known as vaiṣṇava-praharanāni. The Harivaṃśa says they were first made available to Balarāma before his fight with King Jarāsandha of Rājagṛha. Sunanda and Saṃvartaka were the respective names of his divine weapons.

Source: Google Books: Iconography of Balarāma

Musala (मुसल, “pestle”) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—Musala is the name of the Indian wooden pestle, which is an ordinary cylindrical rod of hard wood. It can be used as an offensive weapon.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Dhanurveda (science of warfare)

Musala (मुसल) refers to a kind of weapon (mace or club). It is a Sanskrit word defined in the Dhanurveda-saṃhitā, which contains a list of no less than 117 weapons. The Dhanurveda-saṃhitā is said to have been composed by the sage Vasiṣṭha, who in turn transmitted it trough a tradition of sages, which can eventually be traced to Śiva and Brahmā.

Source: Wisdom Library: Dhanurveda
Dhanurveda book cover
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Dhanurveda (धनुर्वेद) refers to the “knowledge of warfare” and, as an upaveda, is associated with the Ṛgveda. It contains instructions on warfare, archery and ancient Indian martial arts, dating back to the 2nd-3rd millennium BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Musala (मुसल) is a Sanskrit word for a weapon translating to “club”. Sculptures or other depictions of Hindu dieties are often seen holden this weapon in their hand.

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Muṣala (मुषल) refers to a “pestle” and represents one of the items held in the left hand of Heruka: one of the main deities of the Herukamaṇḍala described in the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Heruka is positioned in the Lotus (padma) at the center; He is the origin of all heroes; He has 17 faces (with three eyes on each) and 76 arms [holding, for example, muṣala]; He is half black and half green in color; He is dancing on a flaming sun placed on Bhairava and Kālarātrī.

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Musala in Pali glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

musala : (m.) a pestle.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Musala, (m. nt.) (cp. Vedic musala. The etym. is probably to be connected with mṛd (see maddati)) 1. a pestle (whilst udukkhala is “mortar, ” cp. J. II, 428 & see udukkhala) D. I, 166=Pug. 55; DhA. II, 131 (+suppa). ‹-› 2. a club A. II, 241; VvA. 121.—3. a crowbar J. I, 199; PvA. 258 (°daṇḍa). (Page 539)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

musala (मुसल).—n S A pestle &c. See the popular form musaḷa.

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musaḷa (मुसळ).—n (musala S) A pestle, esp. a wooden pestle used in husking rice. 2 A beam or an upright (any one of the three) of a sugarmill.

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musaḷā (मुसळा) [or ळ्या, ḷyā].—a (musaḷa) Sturdy, strapping, stalwart, lusty and loutish. 2 Applied as musaḷajhujhyā q. v.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

musaḷa (मुसळ).—n A pestle. A beam of a sugar- mill. musaḷa pāṅgharaṇēṃ or ḍōkyālā bāndhaṇēṃ To begin a shameless behaviour. musaḷāsa aṅkura phuṭaṇēṃ To resume one's social rela- tions-after long illness &c. sagaḷēṃ musaḷa kērānta Used of an impossibility or a matter regarded as incredible.

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musaḷā (मुसळा).—

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Muśala (मुशल).—A staff, stick; मुशलशब्दश्च दण्डे प्रसिद्धः (muśalaśabdaśca daṇḍe prasiddhaḥ) ŚB. on MS.4.2.18.

Derivable forms: muśalam (मुशलम्).

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Musala (मुसल).—

1) A mace, club; मुसला इव मे घ्नन्ति नेमे बाणाः शिखण्डिनः (musalā iva me ghnanti neme bāṇāḥ śikhaṇḍinaḥ) Mb.6.119.62.

2) A pestle (used for cleaning rice); मुसलमिदमियं च पातकाले मुहुरनुयाति कलेन हुंकृतेन (musalamidamiyaṃ ca pātakāle muhuranuyāti kalena huṃkṛtena) Mu.1.4; Ms.6.56.

3) A kind of surgical instrument.

4) The clapper of a bell (Mar. loḷī).

5) Name of a constellation.

Derivable forms: musalaḥ (मुसलः), musalam (मुसलम्).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Muṣala (मुषल).—m.

(-laḥ) 1. A club, a mace. 2. A pestle for cleaning rice. f. (-lī) 1. A house-lizard. 2. A plant, (Curculigo orchioides:) see muśalī, musala, and musalī .

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Musala (मुसल).—n.

(-laṃ) 1. A pestle, a wooden pestle used for cleaning rice. 2. A club. f. (-lī) 1. A plant, (Curculigo orchioides.) 2. A houselizard. E. mus to break, aff. kalac; it is also read with its compounds and derivatives muṣala, muṣalī, and sometimes muśala, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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