Wisdom Library Logo

Meghamala, aka: Megha-mala, Meghamālā; 3 Definition(s)


Meghamala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism


Meghamālā (मेघमाला).—Mt. a boundary hill in Plakṣadvīpa.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 20. 4.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Meghamālā (मेघमाला) refers to a type of syllabic metre (vṛtta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 16. In this metre, the first six, the eighth, the eleventh, the fourteenth the seventeenth, the twentieth and the twenty-third syllables of a foot (pāda) are light (laghu), while the rest of the syllables are heavy (guru).


Meghamālā falls in the Saṃkṛti class of chandas (rhythm-type), which implies that verses constructed with this metre have four pādas (‘foot’ or ‘quarter-verse’) containing twenty-four syllables each.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstraNāṭyaśāstra book cover
context information

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

A robber of great fame. DA.i.89; MA.ii.688.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Relevant definitions

Search found 194 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Mālā (माला).—Why are there 108 beads in the rosary (mālā)? Multiplying the different types of p...
Japamālā (Rosary) - Sādhana or spiritual practice. Meditation and the recitation of mantras....
Megha (मेघ) is the father of Sumati according to Śvetāmbara (according to Digambara he is named...
Muṇḍamālā (Garland of skulls) - perpetual revolution of ages. It also represents all the fal...
Mālāyamaka (मालायमक).—One of the ten kinds of yamaka;—Description of mālāyamaka: When one conso...
Mālāsthāna (मालास्थान), and mālā or “bell”.—Part of the standard pilaster;...
Vaijayanti-mala (वैजयन्ति-मल):—The garland made of five types of forest flowers (or fi...
Mayiya Mala
Māyīya Mala: Māya through its Kancukas puts a limitation on its knowledge and action. The ho...
Mālāsana (मालासन, “garland posture”) is a Sanskrit word referring to a type of p...
Kuvalayamālā (कुवलयमाला) refers to a type of syllabic metre (vṛtta), according to the Nāṭyaśāst...
Vidyunmālā (विद्युन्माला) is another name for Vidyullekhā, which refers to a type of syllabic m...
The worship of Śrī-Cakra is done through Devi Khaḍgamāla (literally garland of swords, indic...
Cittamala—stain of h. PvA.17;  
Vyālamālā (व्यालमाला).—A type of moulding common to both the prastara (parapet) and ad...
Anava Mala
Anava Mala: It is an innate impurity in connection with the status of the soul being an anu ...

Relevant text

Search found books containing Meghamala, Megha-mala or Meghamālā. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the most relevant articles:

- Was this explanation helpufll? Leave a comment:

Make this page a better place for research and define the term yourself in your own words.

You have to be a member in order to post comments. Click here to login or click here to become a member.