Malika, Mālika, Mālikā: 17 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Malika means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Shodhganga: Temples of Salem region Up to 1336 AD

Mālikā (मालिका) is a cloistered verandah built on the inner side of the prākāra wall. The mālikās according to the Texts may be built up to three storeys. Mālikās are also referred to as āvṛtamaṇḍapas i.e. the pavilions that are built surrounding or enclosing a structure or a courtyard. Generally mālikās are constructed surrounding the courtyard but in a few instances they are built surrounding the main shrine too. Rare instances of mālikās constructed like pavilions/corridors outside the prākāra are noticed. No mention of such mālikās outside the temple complex is foimd in the Texts. Therefore, it is possible that it is a construction made for the convenience of the pilgrims who visit the temple during the festival season.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Mālika (मालिक) is the name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) to which Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) assigned the alternative name of Ujjvala in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Malika (मलिक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.65) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Malika) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Malika.—(EI 4; BL), Muslim title of nobility; same as Arabic Malik; also spelt in Indian languages as Mallika. Note: malika is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

See also (synonyms): Malik.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mālika : (adj.) having garlands or flowers.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

1) Mālika, 2 (fr. mālā) a gardener, florist Abhp 507. (Page 530)

2) Mālika, 1 (nt.) (fr. mālā or mala?) name of a dice J. VI, 281. (Page 530)

— or —

Mālikā, (f.) (fr. mālā) double jasmine Dāvs 5, 49. (Page 530)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mālīka (मालीक).—c ( A) An owner: also a lord, master, ruler. See mālaka.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mālīka (मालीक).—e An owner. A master.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Malika (मलिक).—A king.

Derivable forms: malikaḥ (मलिकः).

--- OR ---

Mālika (मालिक).—[mālā tannirmāṇaṃ śilpamasya ṭhan]

1) A florist, gardener.

2) A dyer, painter.

3) A garland-maker.

4) A kind of bird.

Derivable forms: mālikaḥ (मालिकः).

--- OR ---

Mālikā (मालिका).—[mālaiva kan ata itvam]

1) A garland; पाशाक्षमालिकाम्भोज (pāśākṣamālikāmbhoja) Lakṣmīdhyānam.

2) A row, line, series.

3) A string, necklace.

4) A variety of jasmine.

5) Linseed.

6) A daughter.

7) A palace.

8) A kind of bird.

9) An intoxicating drink.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Mālikā (मालिका).—name of a queen, wife of Prasenajit: Avadāna-śataka ii.9.6.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālika (मालिक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) Relating to a garland, &c. m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A florist, a flower-gatherer or seller. 2. A sort of bird. 3. A colorist, a painter. f.

(-kā) 1. Double jasmine, (Jasminum zambac, floribus multiplicatis.) 2. A daughter. 3. A necklace, any ornament of the neck. 4. A garland of flowers, a wreath. 5. The name of a river. 6. A spirituous or vinous liquor. 7. Linseed, (Linum utilatissimum.) 8. A palace. 9. A row, a series. E. mālā a garland, ṭhan aff., or kan added, fem. form.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālika (मालिक).—i. e. mālā + ika, I. adj. Relating to a garland. Ii. m. 1. A flower-gatherer, [Pañcatantra] v. [distich] 55 (cf. [Pañcatantra] 156, 20). 2. A painter. 3. A sort of bird. Iii. f. . 1. A garland of flowers, [Pañcatantra] 236, 16. 2. A multitude, [Hitopadeśa] iii. [distich] 89. 3. A necklace. 4. A daughter. 5. A palace. 6. A spirituous liquor. 7. Double jasmine.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālika (मालिक).—[masculine] wreath-maker.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Malika (मलिक):—m. (= ملك) a king, [Catalogue(s)]

2) Mālikā (मालिका):—[from mālaka > māla] a f. a garland, [Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara]

3) [v.s. ...] a necklace, [Harivaṃśa]

4) [v.s. ...] a row, series, collection of things arranged in a line, [Kāvya literature]

5) [v.s. ...] a white-washed upper-storied house, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of various plants (double jasmine, Linum Usitatissimum etc.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a kind of bird, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] an intoxicating drink, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] a daughter, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] Name of a river, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) Mālika (मालिक):—[from māla] m. a garland-maker, gardener, [Kāvya literature; Pañcatantra]

12) [v.s. ...] a painter, dyer, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] a kind of bird, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) Mālikā (मालिका):—[from mālika > māla] b f. See under mālaka.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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