Malaka, Mālāka, Māḷaka, Mālākā, Mālaka, Malākā: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Malaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Māḷaka can be transliterated into English as Malaka or Maliaka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Malaka (मलक).—Was the Asura who entered heaven, snatched away the nectar vessel from Dhanvantari: Mohinī helped the gods in the scuffle that ensued and Malaka fled to Pātālam.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 9. 38. 10. 2, 23.

1b) A commander of Bhaṇḍa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 21. 85.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mālaka (मालक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.61) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mālaka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Mālāka (मालाक) is the name of a Vīra (hero) who, together with the Ḍākinī named Mālinī forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Guṇacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the guṇacakra refers to one of the four divisions of the sahaja-puṭa (‘innate layer’), situated within the padma (lotus) in the middle of the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs and Vīras [viz., Mālāka] are whitish red in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mālaka : (m.) a circular enclosure; a round yard.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Māḷaka, (a Non-Aryan word, although the Dhtm 395 gives roots mal & mall in meaning “dhāraṇa” (see under mala). Cp. malorika) a stand, viz. for alms-bowl (patta°) Vin. II, 114, or for drinking vessel (pānīya°) J. VI, 85. (Page 531)

— or —

Mālaka, (Māḷaka) (fr. māla or māḷa) a circular (consecrated) enclosure, round, yard (cp. Geiger, Mhvs. trsl. 99: “m. is a space marked off and usually terraced, within which sacred functions were carried out. In the Mahāvihāra (Tiss’ārāma) at Anurādhapura there were 32 mālakas; Dpvs XIV. 78; Mhvs 15, 192. The sacred Bodhi-tree e.g. was surrounded by a malaka”).—The word is peculiar to the late (Jātaka-) literature, & is not found in the older texts.—J. I, 449 (vikkama°); IV, 306; V, 49 (visāla°), 138 (id. , spelling maḷaka); Mhvs 15, 36 (Mahā-mucala°); 16, 15; 32, 58 (saṅghassa kamma°, encl. for ceremonial acts of the S. , cp. 15, 29); DhA. IV, 115 (°sīmā); Vism. 342 (vitakka°). (Page 530)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

maḷakā (मळका).—a (maḷa) Dirty, foul, filthy.

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mālaka (मालक).—c ( A) An owner or a proprietor: also a lord, ruler, master. 2 The rightful or proper person; the person of whom it is the province or peculiar business or right. Ex. mājhā bāpa jāmīna rāhilā āhē tō tyā gōṣṭīcā mā0 tyāsa kāya tēṃ vicārā.

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māḷakā (माळका).—f (māḷa) A string, line, train (of things or of living creatures). v lāva, lāga.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mālaka (मालक).—c An owner. The rightful person.

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māḷakā (माळका).—f A string, line, train (of things, &c.).

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Malākā (मलाका).—

1) An amorous or lustful woman.

2) A female messenger, confidante.

3) A female elephant.

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Mālaka (मालक).—

1) The Nimba tree.

2) A wood near a village.

3) A pot made of a cocoa-nut shell.

4) An arbour, bower.

-kā, -kam 1 A garland.

2) The land-growing lotus; L. D. B.

Derivable forms: mālakaḥ (मालकः).

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Mālākā (मालाका).—f. A garland; L. D. B.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Mālaka (मालक).—name of a hunter in the Kiṃnarī Jātaka (story of Manoharā); compare Halaka: Mahāvastu ii.102.1; 104.8; 105.18; 114.8, 10.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Malākā (मलाका).—f.

(-kā) 1. A female messenger. 2. A lewd woman. 3. A female elephant. E. mala, āka aff.

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Mālaka (मालक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. The Nimba tree, (Melia azadiracta.) 2. A vessel made of cocoanut-shell. n.

(-kaṃ) A flower, (Hibiscus mutabilis.) f.

(-kā) A garland. E. mālā a garland, kan aff. and the final of the fem. rejected; also in the fem. form, mālākā and mālikā q. v.

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Mālākā (मालाका).—f.

(-kā) A garland, a wreath. E. mālā the same, kan pleonasm.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Malākā (मलाका).—i. e. mala + āka, f. 1. A lewd woman. 2. A female messenger. 3. A female elephant.

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Mālaka (मालक).—[-māla + ka], at the end of comp. adj., f. likā; e. g. akṣara-, Consisting of a line of letters, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 183. baddha-vandana-, adj. Having fastened garlands of salutation, [Pañcatantra] 207, 24 (but cf. vandana-mālā, s. v. māla).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālaka (मालक).—[masculine] arbour, bower; [feminine] likā garland, necklace; row, line, multitude; [neuter] garland, ring.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Malaka (मलक):—[from mala] m. [plural] Name of a people, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

2) Malākā (मलाका):—f. (only [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) a female messenger, confidante

3) an amorous woman

4) a female elephant.

5) Mālaka (मालक):—[from māla] m. ([probably]) an arbour, bower, [Siṃhāsana-dvātriṃśikā or vikramāditya-caritra, jaina recension]

6) [v.s. ...] Melia Sempervirens, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a wood near a village, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] [plural] Name of a people, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

9) Mālakā (मालका):—[from mālaka > māla] f. a garland, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Mālaka (मालक):—[from māla] n. a garland, ring, [Suśruta]

11) [v.s. ...] Hibiscus Mutabilis, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) Mālākā (मालाका):—[from māla] f. = mālikā (See under mālaka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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