Shivottama, Śivottama: 3 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Shivottama means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śivottama can be transliterated into English as Sivottama or Shivottama, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Elements of Hindu Iconograpy

According to the Aṃśumadbhedāgama, Śivottama (3rd class Vidyeśvara) is of white complexion, has four arms and two eyes, is adorned with a karaṇḍa-makuṭa and with other appropriate ornaments and is clothed in white garments. He bears on his chest a white yajñopavīta. Keeping his front hands in the varada and abhaya poses, and carrying in his back hands the śūla and the pāśa, he stands erect (samabhaṅga) on a padma-pīṭha.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Shivottama in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

1) Śivottama (शिवोत्तम), one of the fifty Rudras according to the Caryāpāda section of the Makuṭāgama (one of the 28 Saiva Siddhanta Agamas).

2) Śivottama (शिवोत्तम) refers to one of the “eight embodiments” (mūrtyaṣṭaka) of Śiva according to the Svacchandatantra 10.1161–1162 where they are identical with the eight vidyeśvaras (lords of knowledge). The eight embodiments are also mentioned in a copper-plate inscription found in Malhar, Chhattisgarh, written around 650 CE.

All these manifestations of Śiva (e.g., Śivottama) appear at the borders of various divisions of the universe according to the Lākula system.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shivottama in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Śivottama (शिवोत्तम).—See Vighneśa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 65.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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