Kevali, aka: Kevalī; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kevali means something in Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[Kevali in Jainism glossaries]

Kevalī (केवली, “omniscient”) refers to “attributing faults to the omniscient” and is one of the causes leading to the influx (āsrana) of faith-deluding (darśana-mohanīya) karmas.

Kevalī is a Sanskrit technical term defined in the Tattvārthasūtra (ancient authorative Jain scripture) from the 2nd century, which contains aphorisms dealing with philosophy and the nature of reality.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Jainism

Kevalī (केवली).—What is meant by the omniscient (kevalī)? The one who has attained perfect / infinite perception and perfect / infinite knowledge is called an omniscient.

What is meant by finding faults in the omniscient (kevalī-avarṇavāda)? To say that omniscient eat through the mouth (i.e. kavalāhāri) is kevalī-avarṇavāda as the omniscient, due to their attainment of nokarmāhāra (body i.e. capability to extract the nutrients required for the body from the environment).

(Source): Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 6: Influx of karmas
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[Kevali in Marathi glossaries]

kēvalī (केवली).—a (In nandabhāṣā) One.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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