Saketa, aka: Sāketa; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Saketa means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

[Saketa in Purana glossaries]

1a) Sāketa (साकेत).—Is Ayodhyā; sometime ruled by the Nāgas.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 54. 54; 74. 195.

1b) A Janapada over which the Guptas ruled.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 383.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

[Saketa in Theravada glossaries]

A town in Kosala. It was regarded in the Buddhas time as one of the six great cities of India, the others being Campa, Rajagaha, Savatthi, Kosambi and Benares (D.ii.146). It was probably the older capital of Kosala, and is mentioned as such in the Nandiyamiga Jataka. J.iii.270; cf. Mtu.i.348, 349, 350, where it is called the capital of King Sujata of the Sakyan race. See also the Kumbha Jataka (J.ii.13), where Saketa is mentioned as one of the places into which alcohol was introduced quite soon after its discovery by Sura and Varuna. According to the Mahanarada Kassapa Jataka (J.vi.228), it was the birthplace of Bijaka, aeons ago. In this context it is called Saketa. According to a tradition, recorded in the Mahavastu, Saketa was the city from which Sakyan princes were exiled when they founded Kapilavatthu. E. J. Thomas accepts this view (op. cit., 16f.).

The Dhammapada Commentary (DhA.i.386), however, states that the city was founded in the Buddhas time by Dhananjaya, father of Visakha, when, at the special invitation of Pasenadi, he went from Rajagaha to live in Kosala. On the way to Savatthi with Pasenadi, Dhananjaya pitched his camp for the night, and learning from the king that the site of the camp was in Kosalan territory and seven leagues from Savatthi, Dhananjaya obtained the kings permission to found a city there. And because the site was first inhabited in the evening (sayam), the city came to be called Saketa. The Divyavadana (211) has another explanation of the name, in connection with the coronation of Mandhata (Svayam agatam svayam agatam Saketa Saketam iti sanjna samvrtta).

The reference is probably to a new settlement established by Dhananjaya in the old city.

We also learn from the Visuddhimagga (p.390; but see below) that the distance from Saketa to Savatthi was seven leagues (yojanas), and there we are told that when the Buddha, at the invitation of Cula subhadda, went from Savatthi to Saketa, he resolved that the citizens of the two cities should be able to see each other. In the older books (E.g., Vin.i.253) however, the distance is given as six leagues. The town lay on the direct route between Savatthi and Patitthana, and is mentioned (SN.vss.1011 1013) as the first stopping place out of Savatthi. The distance between the two places could be covered in one day, with seven relays of horses (M.i.149), but the books contain several references (E.g., Vin.i.88, 89, 270; iii.212; iv. 63, 120) to the dangers of the journey when undertaken on foot. The road was infested with robbers, and the king had to maintain soldiers to protect travellers.

Midway between Saketa and Savatthi was Toranavatthu, and it is said (S.iv.374 ff) that, when Pasenadi went from the capital to Saketa, he spent a night in Toranavatthu, where be visited Khema Theri who lived there.

(Source): Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[Saketa in Mahayana glossaries]

Sāketa (साकेत), a city in Kośala, near Ayodhyā with which it may be confused. Its site has been identified with the ruins of Sukān Koy on the Sai, in the district of Unao of the present province of Aoude. It is the Sageda of Ptolemy.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[Saketa in Jainism glossaries]

Sāketa (साकेत) is the name of a village visited by Mahāvīra during his 19th Year as Kevalī.—After completing the rainy season, wandering through Sāketa, Sāvatthī, etc in Kauśala country, the Lord arrived at Pāñcāla and stayed at Sahasrāmravana of Kampilapura.

Sāketa was also visited by Mahāvīra during his 24th Year as Kevalī.—After the cāturmāsa at Vaiśālī, the Lord moved to Sāketa in Kauśala land. Leaving Sāketa the Lord went to Kampilapura in Pāṃcāla region.

(Source): HereNow4u: Lord Śrī Mahāvīra
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

[Saketa in India history glossaries]

Sāketa (साकेत) and Ayodhyā have been treated by many writers as being identical. Csoma de koros calls this place as “Sāketan or Ayodhyā” and H. H. Wilson in his dictionary, refers to Sāketa as “the city of Ayodhyā”. Several passages in the Raghuvaṃśa (8.5.79) confirm it.The Vividhatīrthakalpa (p. 24) mentions Sākeyam (Sāketa) as asynonym for Ayodhyā, but in the Buddhist literature we find separate references to Ayodhyā and Sāketa which creates doubt about their identity and suggests that the two existed separately.

(Source): archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Saketa in Sanskrit glossaries]

Sāketa (साकेत).—Name of the city of Ayodhyā; साकेतनार्योऽञ्जलिभिः प्रणेमुः (sāketanāryo'ñjalibhiḥ praṇemuḥ) R.14.13;13.79;18.36; अरुणद्यवनः साकेतम् (aruṇadyavanaḥ sāketam) Mbh.

-tāḥ (m. pl.) The inhabitants of Ayodhyā.

Derivable forms: sāketam (साकेतम्).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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