Kavaca: 16 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kavaca means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Kavacha.

In Hinduism

Dhanurveda (science of warfare)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dhanurveda

Kavaca (कवच) refers to a weapon (“amulet” or “armour”). It is a Sanskrit word defined in the Dhanurveda-saṃhitā, which contains a list of no less than 117 weapons. The Dhanurveda-saṃhitā is said to have been composed by the sage Vasiṣṭha, who in turn transmitted it trough a tradition of sages, which can eventually be traced to Śiva and Brahmā.

Dhanurveda book cover
context information

Dhanurveda (धनुर्वेद) refers to the “knowledge of warfare” and, as an upaveda, is associated with the Ṛgveda. It contains instructions on warfare, archery and ancient Indian martial arts, dating back to the 2nd-3rd millennium BCE.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Kavaca (कवच).—A sage in the assembly of Indra. (Mahābhārata Sabhā Parva, Chapter 7). He was one of the sages of the western part. (Mahābhārata Śānti Parva, Chapter 208, Verse 30).

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva

1) Kavaca (कवच) is the name of a deity who received the Prodgītāgama from Śūlin through the mahānsambandha relation, according to the pratisaṃhitā theory of Āgama origin and relationship (sambandha). The prodgīta-āgama, being part of the eighteen Rudrabhedāgamas, refers to one of the twenty-eight Siddhāntāgamas: a classification of the Śaiva division of Śaivāgamas. The Śaivāgamas represent the wisdom that has come down from lord Śiva, received by Pārvatī and accepted by Viṣṇu.

Kavaca obtained the Prodgītāgama from Śūlin who in turn obtained it from Sadāśiva through parasambandha. Kavaca in turn, transmitted it to through divya-sambandha to the Devas who, through divyādivya-sambandha, transmitted it to the Ṛṣis who finally, through adivya-sambandha, revealed the Prodgītāgama to human beings (Manuṣya). (also see Anantaśambhu’s commentary on the Siddhāntasārāvali of Trilocanaśivācārya)

2) Kavaca (कवच) or Kavacāgama refers to one of upāgamas (supplementary scriptures) of the Prodgītāgama which is one of the twenty-eight Siddhāntāgama: a classification of the Śaiva division of Śaivāgamas. The Śaivāgamas represent the wisdom that has come down from lord Śiva, received by Pārvatī and accepted by Viṣṇu. The purpose of revealing upāgamas (e.g., Kavaca Āgama) is to explain more elaborately than that of mūlāgamas (e.g., Prodgīta-āgama) and to include any new idea if not dealt in mūlāgamas.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 5

Kavaca (कवच) or Kavacamudra is the name of a mudrā described in the Īśvarasaṃhitā 24.21-23.—Accordingly, “Two fingers beginning with the thumb and ending with the little finger, when formed separately into a casket with space in between, shall be in the small finger and other would respectively be the mudrās of śiras, śikhā, kavaca, (tanutrāt), protecting the body, astra and netra)”. Mūdra (e.g., Kavaca) is so called as it gives joy to the tattvas in the form of karman for those who offer spotless worship, drive out the defects which move about within and without and sealing up of what is done.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kavaca.—(SITI), same as Tamil tiru-kkoḻgai, the metallic cover exactly fitting the image of a deity; same as kholī, kholikā. Note: kavaca is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kavaca : (m.) a count of a mail; armour.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kavaca, (nt.) (cp. Sk. kavaca) a mail, a coat of mail, armour D. II, 107=Ud. 64 (applied to existence); Th. 1, 614 (of sīla); J. IV, 92, 296; Miln. 199, 257; Vism. 73.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kavaca (कवच).—n m (S) Armour. 2 Any natural armature or defensive coating. 2 A piece of bark inscribed with mystical verses carried about the person as an amulet or a charm.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kavaca (कवच).—n m Armour, any natural arma- ture. kavaca ṭākaṇēṃ To cast off the skin or peel. To undergo the peeling off.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kavaca (कवच).—[cf. Uṇ.4.2.]

1) An armour, coat of mail, a mail.

2) An amulet, a charm, a mystical syllable (hum-hūm) considered as a preservative like armour.

3) A kettle-drum.

Derivable forms: kavacaḥ (कवचः), kavacam (कवचम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kavaca (कवच).—mn.

(-caḥ-caṃ) 1. Armour, mail. 2. A drum used in battle, a kettle drum. 3. An amulet, a charm. 4. A tree, (Hibiscus populneoides.) see garddabhāṇḍa. 3. The mystical syllable Hum, forming part of a Mantra, and considered as a preservative like armour; it is also inscribed on a Birch leaf, &c. and worn as an amulet; being carried about the person as a charm: see the next. E. ku to sound, ac Unadi aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kavaca (कवच).—m. and n. Mail, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 50, 3.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kavaca (कवच).—[masculine] [neuter] armour, mail, jacket, the bark of a tree.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kavaca (कवच):—mn. (√3. ku, [Uṇādi-sūtra iv, 2; Nirukta, by Yāska v, 25]) [gana] ardharcādi, armour, cuirass, a coat of mail, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa xii, 2, 2, 7; Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra xiii, 3, 10; Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

2) any covering

3) a corset, jacket, [Kāṭhaka xxxiv, 5] (ifc. f(ā). ), [Pāṇini 3-2, 129]

4) bark, rind, [Śārṅgadhara]

5) m. a war-drum, a kettle-drum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) n. a piece of bark or birch-leaf or any substance inscribed with mystical words and carried about as an amulet, any amulet, charm, [Horace H. Wilson]

7) a mystical syllable (such as hum, or hūm) forming part of a Mantra used as an amulet (cf. bīja), [Horace H. Wilson]

8) m. the tree Oldenlandia herbacea, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

9) the tree Hibiscus Populneoides, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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