Karmuka, Kārmuka: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Karmuka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Kārmuka (कार्मुक):—One of the eight types of villages, according to Chapter 9 of the Mānasāra (called the grāmalakṣaṇam). The Mānasāra is one of the traditional authorative Hindu treatises on Vāstuśāstra (science of architecture). The form of this village is said to be tattadrūpeṇa, which means it represents the form of the meaning of its Sanskrit name.

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Dhanurveda (science of warfare)

Source: Shodhganga: Kakati Ganapatideva and his times (weapons)

Kārmuka refers to a bow and represents a kind of weapon employed in warfare by the soldiers, according to Śrīnātha’s 15th century Palanāṭivīra-caritra. The Vardhmānapuram inscription states that the king should be proficient in dealing several varieties of weapons.

Dhanurveda book cover
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Dhanurveda (धनुर्वेद) refers to the “knowledge of warfare” and, as an upaveda, is associated with the Ṛgveda. It contains instructions on warfare, archery and ancient Indian martial arts, dating back to the 2nd-3rd millennium BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Kārmuka (कार्मुक) refers to a “bow-shaped moon”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 4), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the two horns of the moon should appear but slightly raised and far from each other presenting the appearance of a boat, she brings trouble on the sailors but prosperity on mankind at large. [...] If the moon should appear like a bow [i.e., kārmuka-rūpa], there will be war in the land; and those will succeed whose places lie in the direction of the bow-string. If the moon should appear stretched from north to south presenting the appearance of a carriage pole there will be earthquake (within that month)”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Kārmuka (कार्मुक) refers to a “dagger” and is used to visualize Bhairava, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “He has eight faces and, very powerful, shines like a white lotus. He is mightily proud and has sharp teeth and great body. He is terrible and fierce and his face is deformed. O Śambhu, he has twenty arms and the goddess sits on his lap. He holds a sword, mallet and noose, a double-headed drum, a dagger [i.e., kārmuka], the Kaustubha jewel, a rosary, a skull bowl full of fruit and the like and a piece of human flesh. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Kārmuka (कार्मुक) refers to a “bow” (weapon), according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “[Visualisation of Parameśvara]:—[...] He is in the prime of his youth and has all the auspicious characteristics. He has the great Ajagava bow (kārmuka) placed on his left side. On his right, he has five glowing arrows. He is shining like a blue lotus. On his chest there is a glittering garland of blue lotuses. He is the Lord. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kārmuka (कार्मुक).—n S A bow. Ex. śivāvari bāṇa sōḍita || uddhaṭa kārmukēṃ vāhōni ||.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kārmuka (कार्मुक).—n A bow.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kārmuka (कार्मुक).—a. (- f.) [कर्मणे प्रभवति इति उकञ् (karmaṇe prabhavati iti ukañ) P.V.1.13.] Fit for or able to do a work, doing it well and completely.

-kam [kṛmukaśabdāt kāṣṭhaviśeṣavācinaḥ, anudāttādeśca iti sūtrasyāpavādena, kopadhācca iti sūtreṇāṇ pratyayena niṣpannaḥ]

1) A bow; तत्कार्मुकं कर्मसु यस्य शक्तिः (tatkārmukaṃ karmasu yasya śaktiḥ) Kirātārjunīya 3.48; त्वयि चाधिज्यकार्मुके (tvayi cādhijyakārmuke) Ś.1.6.

2) A bamboo.

3) The ninth sign of the zodiac.

4) A kind of machine or instrument shaped like a bow.

5) A kind of village situated on the bank of a river or sea; Māna.9.3.459.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kārmuka (कार्मुक).—i. e. kṛmuka (the name of a tree, ved.) + a, n. A bow, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 138.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kārmuka (कार्मुक).—1. [adjective] effective.

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Kārmuka (कार्मुक).—2. [feminine] ī consisting of wood of the tree Kṛmuka; [neuter] ([masculine]) a bow.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kārmuka (कार्मुक):—[from kārma] 1. kārmuka mfn. ([Pāṇini 5-1, 103]) efficacious (as a medicine), [Caraka]

2) [v.s. ...] m. a bamboo, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] the plant Melia sempervirens, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

4) [v.s. ...] the white Khadira tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Smilax China, [Nighaṇṭuprakāśa]

6) [v.s. ...] a kind of honey ([varia lectio] gārmuta q.v.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) 2. kārmuka mf(ī)n. consisting of the wood kṛmuka, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra]

8) n. (ifc. f(ā). , [Mahābhārata]) a bow, [Śāṅkhāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Manu-smṛti] etc.

9) n. a bow-shaped instrument, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) a geometrical arc, [Sūryasiddhānta]

11) the rainbow, [Varāha-mihira’s Yogayātrā]

12) Sagittarius, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

13) a particular constellation, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhajjātaka]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kārmuka (कार्मुक):—(kaṃ) 1. n. A bow. m. n. A bambu. a. Finishing.

[Sanskrit to German]

Karmuka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kārmuka (ಕಾರ್ಮುಕ):—[noun] the beginning of the rainy season.

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Kārmuka (ಕಾರ್ಮುಕ):—

1) [noun] a device for shooting arrows, made of a flexible, curved strip of wood, metal, etc. with a tightly drawn cord connecting the two ends; a bow.

2) [noun] the ninth sign of the zodiac, entered by the sun about November 21; Sagittarius.

3) [noun] the stiff, hard, springy, hollow, jointed stem of any of the tall tropical grasses of Poaceae family; a bamboo.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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