Damaru, aka: Ḍamaru; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Damaru means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Ḍamaru (डमरु) is a small drum with a hollow body open at both ends. Over each of the open ends of this hollow body is stretched a membrane which is held in position firmly by means of a string passing to and fro over the length of the body of the drum. By pressing these strings, the tension of the membranes may be altered at will so as to produce different notes by striking thereon, or by rubbing one of the membranes with a resined stick. Sometimes there is a string attached to the middle of the body of the drum; and to the end of this string is attached a bead. By holding the drum in the middle and shaking it suitably, this string with the bead may be made to strike against the membranes alternately and produce the required sound.

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Ḍamaru refers to the “hour-glass shaped drum”, held in the right upper hand of Naṭarāja—symbolises the act of creation. According to Tantric teachings the act of creation takes place through sonic vibration. This primary sound is symbolised by the drum, from which all the sounds of the Sanskrit alphabet originated at the beginning of time. The process of creating, cognising and naming are all symbolised by the drum.

The two sides of the drum represent the pairs of opposites and their merging in the centre. God and evil, male and female, day and night etc. are all merely two necessary ends of the same continuum.

Source: Red Zambala: Hindu Icons and Symbols | Trinity

Ḍamaru (“hour-glass drum”).—Union of the masculine and feminine and the projection of the universe through sound. When the two halves part the sound ceases and the universe dissolves.

Source: Red Zambala: Hindu Icons and Symbols | Introduction

1) Ḍamaru (डमरु) refers to a type of musical instrument, representing one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The ḍamaru is an instrument generally found in the hands of the images of Śiva and of his manifestations such as Bhairava. Ḍamaru is a small drum with a hollow body open at both ends. Over each of the open ends of this hollow body is stretched a membrane which is held in position firmly by means of a string passing to and fro over the length of the body of the drum. By pressing these strings, the tension of the membranes may be altered at will so as to produce different notes by striking thereon, or by rubbing one of the membranes with a resined stick. Sometimes there is a string attached to the middle of the body of the [Ḍamaru] drum; and to the end of this string is attached a bead.

By holding the [Ḍamaru] drum in the middle and shaking it suitably, this string with the bead may be made to strike against the membranes alternately and produce the required sound.

2) Ḍamaru (डमरु) or Ḍamaruhasta refers to “holding drum” and represents one of the twenty-four gestures with a single hand, as defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—Accordingly, pratimā-lakṣaṇa (body postures of the icons) is comprised of hand gestures (hasta, mudrā or kai-amaiti), stances/poses (āsanas) and inflexions of the body (bhaṅgas). There are thirty-two types of hands [viz., ḍamaru-hasta] classified into two major groups known as tolirkai (functional and expressive gestures) and elirkai (graceful posture of the hand).

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

ḍamaru (डमरु).—m (S) A sort of tabor shaped like an hourglass. 2 A little rattle, a windlass &c. of this shape.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ḍamaru (डमरु).—m A sort of tabor shaped like an hour–glass. A little rattle.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ḍamaru (डमरु).—A sort of small drum shaped like an hourglass and generally used by Kāpālikas; (sometime regarded as n. also); चण्डैर्डमरुनिर्घोषैर्घर्घरं श्रुतवान् ध्वनिम् (caṇḍairḍamarunirghoṣairghargharaṃ śrutavān dhvanim) Rāj. T.2.99.

Derivable forms: ḍamaruḥ (डमरुः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of damaru in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

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