Damanaka: 10 definitions

Introduction

Damanaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Damanaka (दमनक) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., damanaka) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

2) Damanaka (दमनक) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., damanaka) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (D) next»] — Damanaka in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Damanaka (दमनक).—One of characters in a story, of Pañcatantra. (See Mitrabhedam).

2) Damanaka (दमनक).—A daitya (asura) Mahāviṣṇu in his incarnation as Matsya (Matsyāvatāra), killed this asura who was a dweller of the sea. Viṣṇu threw the body of the asura into the earth. By the touch of the Lord the body became fragrant and it was changed to a plant which is known as (Kozhunnu or Kozhuntu) Damanakam. (Skanda Purāṇa).

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (D) next»] — Damanaka in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Damanaka (दमनक) is the name of a jackal (jambuka) and minister of the lion king named Piṅgalaka, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 59. Accordingly, “... there lived in a neighbouring wood a  lion named Piṅgalaka, who had subdued the forest by his might; and that king of beasts had two jackals for ministers: the name of the one was Damanaka, and the name of the other was Karaṭaka”.

The story of Damanaka was narrated by Gomukha to Naravāhanadatta in order to demonstrate that “a man who conquers wrath will not be subject to grief; and a man who displays prudence is never harmed. Even in the case of animals prudence produces success, not valour”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Damanaka, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

1) Damanaka (दमनक) refers to a type of vegetable, according to the Kāmasūtra IV.1.29, and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—From the Kāmasūtra, it appears that kūṣmāṇḍa (pumpkin gourd), āluka (an esculent root), palaṃki (a pot herb), damanaka, āmrātaka, ervāruka (a kind of cucumber), trapusa (cucumber), bottle gourd and brinjal were in common use.

2) Damanaka (दमनक) refers to a type of spices according to Arthaśāstra II.15.21.—Arthaśāstra refers to the spices like śṛṅgibera, ajāji, kirītatikta, gaura, sarṣapa, kustumaburu, coraka, damanaka, maruvaka, śigru, harītakī and meṣaśṛṅga.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Damanaka.—(SITI), a fragrant plant. Note: damanaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

damanaka (दमनक).—m S Southernwood, Artemisia abrotanum.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Damanaka (दमनक).—Name of a tree.

Derivable forms: damanakaḥ (दमनकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Damanaka (दमनक).—[masculine] [Name] of a man & a jackal.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Damanaka (दमनक):—[from dam] m. Artemisia indica, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā lxxvii, 13; Bhaviṣya-purāṇa, khaṇḍa 1 & 2: bhaviṣya-purāṇa & bhaviṣyottara-purāṇa ii]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a man, [Bharaṭaka-dvātriṃśikā iii]

3) [v.s. ...] of a jackal, [Pañcatantra i, 25/26.; Kathāsaritsāgara lx, 19 ff.]

4) [v.s. ...] (n.?) Name of a metre of 4 times 6 short syllables

5) [v.s. ...] of another of 4 lines of 10 short syllables and one long each.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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