Damari, Ḍāmarī, Ḍamarī: 3 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Damari means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Ḍāmarī (डामरी):—Name of one of the six female deities (yoginīs) springing forth from the body of Kuleśvara, the central male deity of the Yoginīcakra (fourth of the five internal cakras), according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. In other tantric sources, such as the Kulārṇava-tantra, she is identified as Ḍākinī.

Ḍāmarī is identified with the bhuvana-adhvan (on of the six paths, or adhvans) and relates to one hundred and eight bhuvanas. Ḍāmarī is also called the “Mistress of chyle” (rasādhipatyasthā) and is situated in the Ādhāra-cakra which is symbolic for her relation with one of the sixfold sites (ṣaṭpura). She is also related to hṛdaya, one of the six aṅgas.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Sanskrit Edition and a Translation of Kambala’s Sādhananidhi, Chapter 8

Ḍāmarī (डामरी) is the name of a deity associated with the syllable “ḍā” of the Heart Mantra of Heruka (hṛdayamantra): one of the four major mantras in the Cakrasaṃvara tradition, as taught in the eighth chapter of the 9th-century Herukābhidhāna and its commentary, the Sādhananidhi.  The Hṛdaya-mantra consists of twenty-two letters. [...] A practitioner in meditation visualizes that twenty-two deities [viz., Ḍāmarī] are developed from the twenty-two letters constituting the mantra. Each letter of the mantra is used as the initial letter of each deity’s name except for the first and second deities, who are the chief couple deities and located at the center of the maṇḍala.

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Ḍamarī (डमरी) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Ḍamara forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Ākāśacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the ākāśacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Ḍamarī] and Vīras are dark blue in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife. Alternatively, the Ḍākinīs have their own marks and motions according to the taste instead of a small drum and a skull staff.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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