Damara, Dāmara: 21 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Damara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Damar.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Mantra-sādhana: Chapter One of the Kakṣapuṭatantra

Ḍāmara (डामर) is the name of an Āgama or Tantra mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra  verse 1.5-7.—“At a previous time, when Pārvatī asked him, Śaṅkara told of the attainments of vidyā in the wide worldly life, in various ways. I observed each teaching taught also by the troops of Gods, Siddhas (those who have attained supernatural power), Munis (saints), Deśikas (spiritual teachers), and Sādhakas (tantric practicioners). They are [, for example]: Ḍāmara... I shall carefully extract all the above-mentioned āgamas, which are transmitted from mouth to mouth, like butter extracted from coagulated milk”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: DSpace at Pondicherry: Siddha Cult in Tamilnadu (hinduism)

Dāmara (दामर).—Another class of Tāntric literature is called Dāmara which traditionally consists of six texts known as Śiva, Yōga, Durga, Sārasvata, Brahmā and Gandharva.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Ḍamara (डमर) is the name of a Vīra (hero) who, together with the Ḍākinī named Ḍamarī forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Ākāśacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the ākāśacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs and Vīras [viz., Ḍamara] are dark blue in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Ḍamara (डमर) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Ḍamara] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Ḍāmara.—(EI 12), tumultuous, terrible; a landlord or wealthy cultivator possessing much land [in ancient Kashmir], according to the Rājataraṅgiṇī. Note: ḍāmara is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ḍāmara (डामर).—n ( H) Dammer, a resinous exudation from a tree of the Malabar coast. Used as tar or pitch.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ḍamara (डमर).—f A slope or ascent. An eminence, a mount.

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ḍāmara (डामर).—n Dammer. Tar or pitch.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ḍamara (डमर).—

1) Riot, tumult, affray.

2) Petty warfare between villages.

3) Terrifying an enemy by shouts and gestures.

-ram Running away through fear, rout.

Derivable forms: ḍamaraḥ (डमरः).

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Ḍāmara (डामर).—a.

1) Terrific, dreadful, awful; पर्याप्तं मयि रमणीयडामरत्वं संधत्ते गगनतलप्रयाणवेगः (paryāptaṃ mayi ramaṇīyaḍāmaratvaṃ saṃdhatte gaganatalaprayāṇavegaḥ) Māl.5.3.

2) Riotous, tumultuous.

3) Resembling, having the appearance (i. e. lovely, beautiful); रतिगलिते ललिते कुसुमानि शिखण्डक- डामरे (ratigalite lalite kusumāni śikhaṇḍaka- ḍāmare) (cikure) Gīt.12.6.

-raḥ 1 An uproar, rout, affray, riot.

2) The bustle and confusion of festivity or strife.

3) Any surprising sight.

4) Name of a mixed caste; Rāj. T.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ḍāmara (डामर).—(1) (m. or nt.; = Sanskrit Lex. id., Sanskrit ḍamara), riot, tumult: kali-kalaha-kaluṣa-ḍimba-ḍāmara-duḥsvapna- vināyaka-pīḍāḥ Suvarṇabhāsottamasūtra 104.3 (prose, no v.l.); (2) (compare Sanskrit id., name of an attendant of Śiva; perhaps the same), name of a super- natural being, probably = Bhūta-ḍāmara: Sādhanamālā 515.1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ḍamara (डमर).—mf.

(-raḥ-rā) 1. An affray, a conflict without weapons. 2. Terrifying an enemy by shouts and gestures. 3. Petty or predatory warfare, war carried on by detachments or by villagers, one in which kings are not engaged. 4. Rout, riot. n.

(-raṃ) Flight. running away through fear. E. ḍam imitative sound, and ara what occasions, from to go, affix ghañarthe ka .

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Ḍāmara (डामर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. Affray, conflict without weapons, &c. See ḍamara. 2. Rout, uproar, the bustle and the confusion of festivity or strife. 3. Any surprising thing, sight or occurrence. 4. A name common to six Tantras, as the Sivadamara, Yogadamara, Durgada mara, f.

(-rā) 1. Terrific. 2. Beautiful. 3. Variegated &c. E. ḍamara q. v. and aṇ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ḍāmara (डामर).—1. m. An object causing surprise, [Gītagovinda. ed. Lassen.] 12, 23. 2. The name of a people, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 51.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ḍamara (डमर).—[masculine] riot, tumult.

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Ḍāmara (डामर).—[adjective] extraordinary, strange ([abstract] tva [neuter]); [masculine] astonishment, wonder.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Ḍāmara (डामर) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—poet. [Subhāshitāvali by Vallabhadeva]

2) Ḍāmara (डामर):—Śāntistotra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ḍamara (डमर):—m. (n., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) a riot, tumult, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Kathāsaritsāgara c; Pārśvanātha-caritra iv, 186;] cf. ḍām.

2) (also) a portent, evil omen, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) Ḍāmara (डामर):—mfn. ‘causing tumult (ḍam.)’, extraordinary, surprising, [Mālatīmādhava] (-tva n. abstr.), [Gīta-govinda xii, 23]

4) m. surprise, sight, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) = ḍam, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) a lord (probably = baron, knight), [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

7) a Name of 6 Tantras (yoga-, śiva-, durgā-, sārasvata-, brahma-, gandharva-)

8) of an attendant of Śiva, [Brahma-purāṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ḍamara (डमर):—[(raḥ-rā)] 1. m. f. An affray; terrifying by shouts; predatory warfare; rout. n. Flight.

2) Ḍāmara (डामर):—(raḥ) 1. m. Affray; rout, uproar; strange event; a tantra.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ḍamara (डमर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ḍamara, Ḍāmara.

[Sanskrit to German]

Damara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Ḍāmara (डामर) [Also spelled damar]:—(nm) tar, pitch, asphalt bitumen.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Ḍamara (डमर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Ḍamara.

2) Ḍāmara (डामर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Ḍāmara.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ḍamara (ಡಮರ):—[noun] a kind of percussion instrument with a membrane of animal-skin stretched tightly on one side to play on.

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Ḍamāra (ಡಮಾರ):—[noun] = ಡಮಾನ [damana].

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Ḍāmara (ಡಾಮರ):—[adjective] that creating fear, awe, etc.; causing dread; formidable.

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Ḍāmara (ಡಾಮರ):—

1) [noun] an attack by a hostile army.

2) [noun] prevalence of epidemic diseases as serious contagious diseases, in a community at a time usu. for a relatively longer time.

3) [noun] an afflicted condition; pain; suffering; affliction; trouble.

4) [noun] extreme and general scarcity of food, as in a country or a large geographical area.

5) [noun] confused state of being; agitation; noisy disturbance; commotion.

6) [noun] a wonderful or astonishing thing; prodigy or miracle.

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Ḍāmara (ಡಾಮರ):—[noun] = ಡಾಂಬರು [dambaru].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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