Shuktimati, Śuktimatī: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Shuktimati means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śuktimatī can be transliterated into English as Suktimati or Shuktimati, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shuktimati in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Śuktimatī (शुक्तिमती).—Name of a river originating from Ṛkṣa, a holy mountain (kulaparvata) in Bhārata, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 85. There are settlements (janapada) where Āryas and Mlecchas dwell who drink water from these rivers.

Bhārata is a region south of Hemādri, once ruled over by Bharata (son of Ṛṣabha), whose ancestral lineage can be traced back to Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Śuktimatī (शुक्तिमती).—A river which used to flow by the side of Uparicaravasu’s capital city. There is a story about this river. Once the Kolāhala mountain fell in love with this river and kept it within himself. Uparicaravasu who came to know of this, gave a kick to the mountain. The kick produced a hole in the mountain and the river emerged through that hole. Śuktimatī had a son and a daughter by Kolāhala mountain. The river presented them to the King. The King appointed the son as his military commander. Girikā, the daughter of the river became the King’s wife. (Mahābhārata Ādi Parva, Chapter 63, Verse 34).

2) Śuktimatī (शुक्तिमती).—The capital city of Dhṛṣṭaketu, King of Cedi. (Mahābhārata, Vana Parva, Chapter 22, Verse 50).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Śuktimatī (शुक्तिमती).—A river from the Ṛkṣa hill.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 31; Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 101.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Śuktimatī (शुक्तिमती) refers to the name of a River mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.63.32, I.63, VI.10.33). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Śuktimatī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Shuktimati in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Śuktimatī (शुक्तिमती) is the name of a city associated with Cedi, which refers to one of the 25½ countries of the Kṣetrāryas, situated in the “middle world” (madhyaloka), according to chapter 2.3 [ajitanātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly:—“In these 35 zones on this side of Mānuṣottara and in the Antaradvīpas, men arise by birth; [...]. From the division into Āryas and Mlecchas they are two-fold. The Āryas have sub-divisions [e.g., kṣetra (country)]. [...] The kṣetrāryas are born in the 15 Karmabhumis. Here in Bharata they have 25½ places of origin (e.g., Cedi), distinguishable by cities (e.g., Śuktimatī) in which the birth of Tīrthakṛts, Cakrabhṛts, Kṛṣṇas, and Balas takes place”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Ancient Buddhist Texts: Geography of Early Buddhism

Śuktimati (शुक्तिमति) or Śuktisāhvaya probably corresponds with Sotthivati (nagara), the ancient capital of Cedi: one of the sixteen Mahājanapadas of the Majjhimadesa (Middle Country) of ancient India, as recorded in the Pāli Buddhist texts (detailing the geography of ancient India as it was known in to Early Buddhism).—The ancient Cedi country lay near the Jumna and was contiguous to that of the Kurus. It corresponds roughly to modern Bundelkhand and the adjoining region. We are told by the Cetiya Jātaka (No. 422) that the capital city of the Cedi country was Sotthivati-nagara which is most probably identical with the city of Śuktimati or Śuktisāhvaya of the Mahābhārata. Other important towns of the Cedi kingdom include Sahajāti and Tripurī, the mediaeval capital of Tripurivishaya or Cedi.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shuktimati in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śuktimatī (शुक्तिमती):—[=śukti-matī] [from śukti-mat > śukti > śukta] f. Name of a river, [ib.]

2) [v.s. ...] of the capital of the Cedis, [ib.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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