Shalmalidvipa, Shalmali-dvipa, Śālmalidvīpa: 6 definitions

Introduction

Shalmalidvipa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śālmalidvīpa can be transliterated into English as Salmalidvipa or Shalmalidvipa, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shalmalidvipa in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Śālmalidvīpa (शाल्मलिद्वीप) is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Dyutimān, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 74. Priyavrata was a son of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

These are the seven major mountains in Śālmalidvīpa:

  1. Sarvaguṇa,
  2. Sauvarṇa,
  3. Rohita,
  4. Sumanasa,
  5. Kuśala,
  6. Jāmbūnada,
  7. Vaidyuta.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Śālmalidvīpa (शाल्मलिद्वीप).—One of the seven islands. General. Śālmali island, which is double in extent of Plakṣa island is surrounded by Ikṣurasa (sugar-cane juice) ocean on all four sides of it. There are seven mountains there which produce gems and they are seven boundaries which separate the regions. Just like this, there are also seven rivers there. The seven rivers are Yoni, Toyā, Vitṛṇā, Candrā, Muktā, Vimocanī and Nirvṛti. Mere remembrance of the seven rivers is sufficient to annihilate all sins. Here people divided into the four classes live. Brahmins, Kṣatriyas Vaiśyas and Śūdras here are called Kapilas, Aruṇas, Pītas and Kṛṣṇas. These devout people worship Viṣṇu in the form of Vāyu by sublime yajñas. Devas are ever present on this most beautiful island. A tree named Sālmali which gives mental comfort grows in this island. The island is surrounded on all four sides by an ocean of Surā (liquor). (Viṣṇu Purāṇa, Part II, Chapter 4).

. Śālmali island and nāgāstra. See under Nāgastra. (See full article at Story of Śālmali-dvīpa from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shalmalidvipa in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: A critical appreciation of soddhalas udayasundarikatha

Śālmalīdvīpa (शाल्मलीद्वीप).—One of the seven continents (dvīpa) of Bhūrloka (earth).—In the Śālmalīdvīpa, there is a big Śālmalī tree, worshipped by the people. The Śālmalidvīpa is encircled by an ocean (samudra) of wine.

Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Śālmalidvīpa (शाल्मलिद्वीप) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—This is one of the seven Dvīpas constituting the world. It is said to be surrounded by the ocean of Surā.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shalmalidvipa in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Śālmalidvīpa (शाल्मलिद्वीप) refers to one of the seven continents (saptadvīpa) situated within the world of the earth (pṛthivī), according to Parākhyatantra 5.61. It is also known as plainly Śālmali or as Śālmadvīpa. These continents are located above the seven pātālas and may contain even more sub-continents within them, are round in shape, and are encircled within seven concentric oceans.

According to the Parākhya-tantra, “beyond that is the continent Śālmalī, where the silk-cotton tree grows in which tree the gods, together with the god of Love, resided when frightened by the demons. Beyond that is the ocean called Sugar-cane juice, where the creator put a great deal of juice from the sugar cane to give pleasure to sages”.

The Parākhyatantra is an old Śaiva-siddhānta tantra dating from before the 10th century.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (S) next»] — Shalmalidvipa in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śālmalidvīpa (शाल्मलिद्वीप):—[=śālmali-dvīpa] [from śālmali > śālmala] m. the Śālmali-dvīpa (See above).

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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