Sannibha, Saṃnibha, Samnibha, Saṃnibhā, Sannibhā: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Sannibha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Google Books: Studies in the History of the Exact Sciences (Astronomy)

Sannibha (सन्निभ) means “resembling”, according to Lalla’s Śiṣyadhīvṛddhidatantra (Part I, 21, Yantrādhikāra, 34-35).—(Cf. Astronomical instruments in Bhāskarācārya’s Siddhāntaśiromaṇi).—Accordingly, “The bowl, which resembles half a pot [i.e., kalaśārdha-sannibha] (i.e. hemispherical), which is made of ten palas of copper, which is half a cubit (i.e. twelve aṅgulas) in diameter at the mouth and half (i.e. six aṅgulas) as high, which is evenly circular, and which is bored by a uniformly circular needle, made of three and one-third māṣas of gold and of four aṅgulas in length, sinks into clear water in one ghaṭikā (nāḍī)”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Saṃnibhā (संनिभा) means “resembling”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “(Mālinī) is endless, supreme, subtle, omnipresent and both supreme (transcendent) and inferior (immanent). [...]  In some places she shines like a network of emeralds; elsewhere she is like (a black) storm cloud [i.e., jīmūta-saṃnibhā]. The goddess (mālinī) resides in the centre of the Void (of the Transcendent) at the end of the merger (of all things) and her form is all things. She who is the supreme goddess resides in the Void and her form is the Void”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Saṃnibha (संनिभ) refers to “that which resembles” (e.g., immovable quartz), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.7cd-17ab, while describing the worship of Bhairavī and Bhairava]—“[...] One should always worship [in times of] peace and prosperity, to suppress sickness and vice, [which are] the root cause of wasting away, [and] for the protection of cows, Brahmins, and men. One meditates on [Bhairava] as having equal radiance to snow, jasmine, the moon, or pearls. [He is] as clear as the curved moon and similar to immovable quartz (sphaṭikācala-saṃnibha). [He is] clear like the burning of the end of time, resembles a flower on the sacred tree, appears red like innumerable suns or, rather, red like a lotus. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Saṃnibha (संनिभ) refers to “resembling” (i.e., ‘that which resembles the great kalpa-fire’) [i.e., oṃ namo mahākalpāgnisaṃnibhāya hūṃ phaṭ], according to the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi [i.e., Cakrasamvara Meditation] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Saṃnibha (संनिभ) refers to “resembling” (i.e., ‘that which is like’), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Also, consider that the state of being a mighty lord over gods, snakes and men, which is like a rainbow (śakrakārmuka-saṃnibha), immediately becomes annihilated by itself”.

Synonyms: Nibha, Sadṛśa, Tulya, Ākāra.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sannibha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sannibha : (adj.) resembling.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Sannibha, (adj.) (saṃ+nibha) resembling D. II, 17; Sn. 551; J. I, 319. (Page 679)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃnibha (संनिभ).—a. Like, similar (at the end of comp.); वनान्तरे तोयमिति प्रधाविता निरीक्ष्य भिन्नाञ्जनसंनिभं नभः (vanāntare toyamiti pradhāvitā nirīkṣya bhinnāñjanasaṃnibhaṃ nabhaḥ) Rs.1.11.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sannibha (सन्निभ).—mfn.

(-bhaḥ-bhā-bhaṃ) Like, similar. E. sam, and nibha like.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃnibha (संनिभ).—i. e. sam-ni-bhā, adj. Like, similar, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 374; iii. [distich] 140.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃnibha (संनिभ).—(—°) resembling, like.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃnibha (संनिभ):—[=saṃ-nibha] mfn. like, similar, resembling (ifc.; often pleonastically with names of colours e.g. pītāruṇa-s = pītāruṇa), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sannibha (सन्निभ):—[sa-nnibha] (bhaḥ-bhā-bhaṃ) a. Like.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saṃnibha (संनिभ) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Saṃniha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sannibha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Sannibha (ಸನ್ನಿಭ):—[adjective] resembling; similar; looking alike.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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