Rajiva, Rājīva, Rājiva: 21 definitions

Introduction:

Rajiva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Rajiv.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I

1) Rājīva (राजीव)—Sanskrit word for a fish (“mullet”?). This animal is from the group called Nādeya-matsya (‘fresh water fish’). Nādeya-matsya itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Ānupa (those that frequent marshy places).

2) Rājīva (राजीव)—Sanskrit word for a fish “mullet” (Mugil corsula). This animal is from the group called Sāmudra-matsya (‘marine fish’). Sāmudra-matsya itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Ānupa (those that frequent marshy places).

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Rājiva (राजिव) (lit. “one who is living at kings expense”) is a synonym (another name) for the Elephant (Gaja), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Manblunder: Lalitā-sahasranāma 307

Rājiva means deer, fish or lotus, depending upon the context. Rājiva also means king.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra

Rājīva (राजीव) is a Sanskrit word referring to “red-coloured”. The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 5.16)

Source: Prācyā: Animals and animal products as reflected in Smṛti texts

Rājīva (राजीव) refers to a fish-species.—Manusmṛti I.44 includes fishes among aquatic creatures and states they are oviparous. It states that they are not to be rejected if offered voluntarily IV.250. Manusmṛti VIII.95 states that fish bones are harmful if swallowed unaware along with its flesh. The Smṛtis also mention several species of fishes [like Rājīva].

The Manusmṛti permits that Siṃhatuṇḍaka, Śaśalka and Rājīva can be eaten on all occasions while the fishes namely Rohita and Pāṭhīna are to be eaten after offering them to the gods. [...] The Viṣṇusmṛti 51.21 also states that Pāṭhīna, Rohita, Siṃhatuṇḍaka, Śakula and Rājīva can be consumed.

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Rājīva (राजीव) refers to a “lotus”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.12.—Accordingly, after Himācala (i.e., Himālaya) brought his daughter (Pārvatī) before Śiva: “Then Śiva looked at her in the first flush of her youth. [...] Her two breasts resembling lotus-buds [i.e., rājīva-kuḍmala] were stout, plump and firm. Her waist was slender and the curly locks of her hair shone well. Her feet resembled the land-lotus and were comely in appearance. She was competent to shake the minds of even the sages deeply engrossed in meditation, even at the very sight. She was a crest-jewel of all the maidens in the world”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Rājīva (राजीव) refers to a “blue lotus”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 11.1-24ab, while describing the appearance and worship of Tumburu]—“[...] [He worships] Deva as Tumburu in the middle of an eight petaled lotus, in the maṇḍala, [starting] in the East, O Devī. [...] He [has] a half-moon in his topknot, sits in the blue lotus Āsana (rājīva-āsana-saṃsthita). [Tumburu is] white like a drop of frosty jasmine, similar to mountain snow. [He wears] a serpent as a sacred thread and is adorned with snake ornaments. [Tumburu is] adorned with all jewels, a tiger skin on the ground [below his] hips, a garment of elephant skin, mounted on a very strong bull, and wears a rhino hide. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Rājīva (राजीव) refers to a “lotus”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “The thirty gods, whose heads are bowed, bow down to the line of lotus feet (pāda-rājīva-rājikā) of those whose hearts have become a refuge only for the doctrine. That very same doctrine, which is devoted to the helpless, is a preceptor and a friend, and the doctrine is a master and a brother. It is a protector without a motive”.

Synonyms: Kamala, Ambhoja.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

rājīva (राजीव).—m (Poetry.) A husband or a lover.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rājīva (राजीव).—m A husband or a lover.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव).—[rājī dalarājī astyasya va]

1) A kind of deer.

2) A crane.

3) An elephant.

4) A species of fish; Manusmṛti 5.16.

-vam A blue lotus, Nymphea lotus; प्रफुल्ल- राजीवमिवाङ्कमध्ये (praphulla- rājīvamivāṅkamadhye) Kumārasambhava 3.45.

Derivable forms: rājīvaḥ (राजीवः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव).—mfn.

(-vaḥ-vā-vaṃ) Attending on or living about a prince. m.

(-vaḥ) 1. A large fish, (Cyprinus niloticus, Buch.) 2. A kind of deer. 3. An elephant. n.

(-vaṃ) A lotus, (Nelumbium speciosum.) E. rājī a line, a row, va aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव).—I. m. 1. An elephant 2. A kind of deer. 3. The Indian crane. 4. A large fish, Cyprinus niloticus Buch., [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 5, 16. Ii. n. A lotus, Chr. 50, 11; [Indralokāgamana] 4, 41.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव).—[adjective] striped; [masculine] a cert. fish; [neuter] a blue lotus-flower.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Rājīva (राजीव):—[from rāj] 1. rājīva mfn. (for 2. See [column]3) living at a king’s expense (= rājopajīvin), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [from rāji] 2. rājīva mf(ā)n. (for 1. See [column]1) streaked, striped, [???]

3) [v.s. ...] m. a species of fish, [Manu-smṛti v, 16; Yājñavalkya; Suśruta]

4) [v.s. ...] a kind of striped deer, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

5) [v.s. ...] the Indian crane, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] an elephant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] Name of the pupil of Viśva-nātha, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

8) [v.s. ...] n. a blue lotus-flower, [Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव):—[(vaḥ-vā-vaṃ) a.] Attending on a prince. m. A large fish; kind of deer; elephant. n. Lotus.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Rājīva (राजीव) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Rāīva.

[Sanskrit to German]

Rajiva in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव) [Also spelled rajiv]:—(nm) a lotus flower; ~[nayana/locana] lotus-eyed.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Rājīva (ರಾಜೀವ):—

1) [noun] the water lily plant Nelumbo nucifera ( = Nelumbium speciosum) of Nymphaeaceae family.

2) [noun] its flower used as a religious symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism.

3) [noun] another waterlily Nymphaea nouchali ( = N. pubescens) of the same family.

4) [noun] its white flower; white flower.

5) [noun] a species of fish.

6) [noun] a sepecies of deer.

7) [noun] an elephant.

8) [noun] a multitude; a gathering; a crowd.

9) [noun] hair growing on the head.

10) [noun] water.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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