Rajiva, Rājīva, Rājiva: 11 definitions

Introduction

Rajiva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I

1) Rājīva (राजीव)—Sanskrit word for a fish (“mullet”?). This animal is from the group called Nādeya-matsya (‘fresh water fish’). Nādeya-matsya itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Ānupa (those that frequent marshy places).

2) Rājīva (राजीव)—Sanskrit word for a fish “mullet” (Mugil corsula). This animal is from the group called Sāmudra-matsya (‘marine fish’). Sāmudra-matsya itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Ānupa (those that frequent marshy places).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Manblunder: Lalitā-sahasranāma 307

Rājiva means deer, fish or lotus, depending upon the context. Rājiva also means king.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra

Rājīva (राजीव) is a Sanskrit word referring to “red-coloured”. The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 5.16)

Source: Prācyā: Animals and animal products as reflected in Smṛti texts

Rājīva (राजीव) refers to a fish-species.—Manusmṛti I.44 includes fishes among aquatic creatures and states they are oviparous. It states that they are not to be rejected if offered voluntarily IV.250. Manusmṛti VIII.95 states that fish bones are harmful if swallowed unaware along with its flesh. The Smṛtis also mention several species of fishes [like Rājīva].

The Manusmṛti permits that Siṃhatuṇḍaka, Śaśalka and Rājīva can be eaten on all occasions while the fishes namely Rohita and Pāṭhīna are to be eaten after offering them to the gods. [...] The Viṣṇusmṛti 51.21 also states that Pāṭhīna, Rohita, Siṃhatuṇḍaka, Śakula and Rājīva can be consumed.

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

rājīva (राजीव).—m (Poetry.) A husband or a lover.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rājīva (राजीव).—m A husband or a lover.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव).—[rājī dalarājī astyasya va]

1) A kind of deer.

2) A crane.

3) An elephant.

4) A species of fish; Ms.5.16.

-vam A blue lotus, Nymphea lotus; प्रफुल्ल- राजीवमिवाङ्कमध्ये (praphulla- rājīvamivāṅkamadhye) Ku.3.45.

Derivable forms: rājīvaḥ (राजीवः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव).—mfn.

(-vaḥ-vā-vaṃ) Attending on or living about a prince. m.

(-vaḥ) 1. A large fish, (Cyprinus niloticus, Buch.) 2. A kind of deer. 3. An elephant. n.

(-vaṃ) A lotus, (Nelumbium speciosum.) E. rājī a line, a row, va aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव).—I. m. 1. An elephant 2. A kind of deer. 3. The Indian crane. 4. A large fish, Cyprinus niloticus Buch., [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 5, 16. Ii. n. A lotus, Chr. 50, 11; [Indralokāgamana] 4, 41.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rājīva (राजीव).—[adjective] striped; [masculine] a cert. fish; [neuter] a blue lotus-flower.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Rājīva (राजीव):—[from rāj] 1. rājīva mfn. (for 2. See [column]3) living at a king’s expense (= rājopajīvin), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [from rāji] 2. rājīva mf(ā)n. (for 1. See [column]1) streaked, striped, [???]

3) [v.s. ...] m. a species of fish, [Manu-smṛti v, 16; Yājñavalkya; Suśruta]

4) [v.s. ...] a kind of striped deer, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

5) [v.s. ...] the Indian crane, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] an elephant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] Name of the pupil of Viśva-nātha, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

8) [v.s. ...] n. a blue lotus-flower, [Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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