Rajas; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Rajas means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmaśāstra (religious law)

Rajas (रजस्).—One of the three guṇas, representing the quality of love and hate. These three qualities are to be seen as all-pervading and interpenetrating all beings. The Sanskrit word rajas is a technical term used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti.

According to the Manusmṛti XII.28: “What is mixed with pain and brings unhappiness to the soul,—know that to be ‘rajas’, imperceptible and constantly attracting embodied beings”.

According to the Manusmṛti XII.32: “Proneness to undertake work, impatience, commission of improper acts, constant addiction to sensual objects are the characteristics of the quality of ‘rajas’”.

According to the Manusmṛti XII.36: “When, by a certain act, the man desires great fame in this world, and does not mind failure—this should be understood to partake of the quality of ‘rajas’”.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmaśāstra book cover
context information

Dharmaśāstra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharma-shastra) is a category of Hindu literature containing important instructions regarding religious law, ethics, economics, jurisprudence and more. It is categorised as smṛti, an important and authorative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

Rasaśāstra (chemistry and alchemy)

Rajas (रजस्):—Sanskrit word for a unit of measurement of weight, according to the Rasa-darpaṇa (Sanskrit work on rasaśāstra, or Medical Alchemy). Six yūkās constitute one rajas.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasaśāstra book cover
context information

Rasaśāstra (रसशास्त्र, rasa-shastra) is an important branch of Āyurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasaśāstra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Rajas (रजस्):—Another name for vaṃśī (unit of weight), according to the Cintāmaṇi.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Hinduism

1) Rajas (रजस्) denotes the region of the atmosphere between heaven and earth in the Rigveda and later. The atmosphere, like the sky (div), is divided into three regions, but more normally into two, the ‘earthly’ (pārthiva) and the ‘heavenly’ (divya or divaḥ). In some passages the word refers in the plural to the dusty fields on earth.

2) Rajas (रजस्) in one passage of the Yajurveda-saṃhitās clearly means ‘silver’, like Rajata. It is also taken in this sense in one passage of the Rigveda by Zimmer, but this interpretation is doubtful.

(Source): archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Rajas is associated with concepts of energy, activity, ambition, and passion; so that, depending on how it is used, it can either have a supportive or hindering effect on the evolution of the soul.

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Rajas (रजस्, “dusty”) refers to one of the “twenty form objects” (rūpa) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 34). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., rajas). The work is attributed to Nagarguna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Relevant definitions

Search found 500 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Raja
raja (रज).—n m Dust. The poilen of flowers. The menstrual discharge. Second of the three proper...
Rajahamsa
rājahaṃsa (राजहंस).—m A white goose with red legs and bill.
Yuvaraja
Yuvarāja (युवराज, “heir apparent”).—Next to the king, Yuvarāja or heir apparent was an importan...
Mrigaraja
mṛgarāja (मृगराज) [-pati-vara, -पति-वर].—m A lion.
Rajamasha
rājamāṣa (राजमाष).—m S A bean, Dolichos catjang.
Rajasana
rājāsana (राजासन).—n A throne.
Rajamandala
rājamaṇḍala (राजमंडल) [-ḷa, -ळ].—n The royal circle, court.
Rajayakshma
Rājayakṣma (राजयक्ष्म, “royal sickness”) is mentioned in the Rigveda and several times later on...
Rajadanta
rājadanta (राजदंत).—m (S) A common term for the incisors or cutter-teeth.
Rajapura
Rajapura (or, Rājapurā) refers to one of the 84 castes (gaccha) in the Jain community according...
Rajayoga
rājayōga (राजयोग).—m (S) A simple and easy mode of abstract meditation; as disting. from the au...
Gandharaja
gandharāja (गंधराज).—m A flowering shrub, Gardenia florida. Grah.
Ranaca Raja
rānacā rājā (रानचा राजा).—m (King of the wilderness.) A term applied to the bhīla & kātakarī.
Raja:kana
raja:kaṇa (रज:कण).—m A particle of dust or powder.
Ekapadarajakapotasana
Ekapādarājakapotāsana (एकपादराजकपोतासन, “one-leg king pigeon posture”) is a Sans...

Relevant text

- Was this explanation helpful? Leave a comment:

Make this page a better place for research and define the term yourself in your own words.

You have to be a member in order to post comments. Click here to login or click here to become a member.