Mrigi, Mṛgi: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Mrigi means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Mṛgi can be transliterated into English as Mrgi or Mrigi, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Mṛgī (मृगी).—The mother of all types of deer. (See under Mṛgas).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mṛgi (मृगि).—A daughter of Krodhavaśa and wife of Pulaha; deer and other animals like hare were born of her.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 172-73; Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 205, 206.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mṛgī (मृगी) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.60.58). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mṛgī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Mṛgī (मृगी) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Mṛgī corresponds to Taḍit (according to Bharata). Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Mṛgī (मृगी) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Mṛga forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Medinīcakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the medinīcakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Mṛgī] and Vīras are yellow in color; the shapes of their faces are in accordance with their names; they have four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mṛgī (मृगी).—f S A doe.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mṛgī (मृगी).—f A doe.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mṛgī (मृगी).—

1) A female deer, doe.

2) Epilepsy.

3) Name of a particular class of women.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Mṛgī (मृगी).—name of a Śākyan woman, mother of Ānanda, to whom is attributed the stanza attributed in Pali (Jātaka (Pali) i.60.30—33) to Kisāgotamī: Mahāvastu ii.157.9, 16; iii.176.16.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mṛgī (मृगी):—[from mṛga > mṛg] a f. a female deer or antelope, doe, [Harivaṃśa; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] Name of the mythical progenitress of antelopes, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Purāṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] a [particular] class of women, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a kind of metre, [Colebrooke]

5) [v.s. ...] a [particular] gait of a dancing girl, [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha]

6) [v.s. ...] demoniacal possession, epilepsy, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [from mṛg] b f. (of mṛga above) a female deer, doe.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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