Minakshi, aka: Mīnākṣī, Mina-akshi; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Minakshi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Mīnākṣī can be transliterated into English as Minaksi or Minakshi, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Mīnākṣī is the name of deity as found depicted in the Meenakshi Temple in Madurai (or Madura), which represents a sacred place for the worship of The Goddess (Devī).—Mīnākṣī is represented in sama-sthānaka with two hands, the right hand in kapittha holding flower and the left hand in dolā hanging loose. When represented with two hands, the right hand is shown in kaṭaka-hasta and the left hand in dolā-hasta. She is seen in atibhaṅga in samapāda-sthānaka. The goddess comes under the measurement of madhyama-daśatāla.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Mīnākṣī (मीनाक्षी) refers to a Devī temple near Mādurā.—There are also two Śiva temples, one known as Rāmeśvara and the other known as Sundareśvara. There is also a temple to Devī called the Mīnākṣī-devī temple, which displays very great architectural craftsmanship. It was built under the supervision of the kings of the Pāṇḍya Dynasty, and when the Muslims attacked this temple, as well as the temple of Sundareśvara, great damage was done.

Source: Prabhupada Books: Sri Caitanya Caritamrta
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Minakshi in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mīnākṣī (मीनाक्षी) refers to one of the manifestations of Pārvatī or Śakti.—Śrī Mīnākṣī is the mūla-bera of Śrī Mīnākṣī Temple in Madurai. On seeing the mūla-bera of Śrī Mīnākṣī in the garbhagṛha, the devotee stands still in awe and wonder. The goddess is modeled with extreme beauty and grace, radiating serenity. [...] The religious significance of the mūla-bera of Śrī Mīnākṣī is that she has a beautiful forehead and well defined eyebrows. These features ensure a stable and secure income. A well proportionate image would bring happiness to the community. A gracefully rounded neck ensures success in every action. Beautiful thighs would ensure fertile crops, attractive ankles would protect the growth of villages, and pretty feet would foster learning and add to the moral values of the community. As Goddess Śrī Mīnākṣī is a perfect feminine with all the features in perfectness, the devotee who worships her will be filled with abundant fertility and wealth, thus making him/her happy.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (shaktism)
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Minakshi in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mīnākṣī (मीनाक्षी, “fish-eyed”):—In Vedic hinduism, she is the daughter of Kubera and his wife Bhadrā. Kubera is the Vedic God of wealth presiding over all earthly treasures.

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

India history and geogprahy

Mīnākṣī is another spelling for the Meenakshi Temple in Madurai (or Madura) represents a sacred place for the worship of The Goddess (Devī).—The Nayaks of Madurai were responsible for the grandest religious monuments of the period, such as the double temple dedicated to Mīnākṣī and Sundareśvar in the middle of their capital. The Mīnākṣī Sundareśvar Temple of Madurai is an ancient center of worship as well as an art gallery of vast proportions...

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (history)
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Minakshi in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mīnākṣī (मीनाक्षी).—Name of a deity (worshipped in Madurā).

Mīnākṣī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mīna and akṣī (अक्षी).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mīnākṣī (मीनाक्षी).—f. (-kṣī) The daughter of Kuvera. E. mīna a fish, and akṣi the eye, ṭac and ṅīṣ affs.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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