Kulya; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kulya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Kulya (कुल्य).—A Ṛṣi who belonged to the line of disciples of Vyāsa. (Bhāgavata, 12th Skandha).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Kulya (कुल्य).—A disciple of Pauṣyañji; learnt a hundred Sāma samhitas.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa XII. 6. 79.

1b) A son of Āṇḍira, after whom the Kulya deśa was called.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 6.

1c) One of the four sons of Janāpīḍa; his country, Kulayāḥ.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 6.

1d) The people of a southern kingdom,1 a Janapada.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 56; Matsya-purāṇa 114. 35 and 46.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 110, 124.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Kulya (कुल्य) is the name of a country included within Dakṣiṇapatha which was situated to the south of the Vindhyas according to the Yādavaprakāśa. Dakṣiṇāpatha is a place-name ending is patha mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

Source: Wisdom Library: India History

Kulya.—(IE 8-6), a measure of capacity equal to 8 droṇas. (IE 8-6; EI 29), a land measure; shortened form of kulyavāpa. Note: kulya is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Kulyā.—(EI 13), a channel for irrigation. Note: kulyā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

kulyā (कुल्या).—f S A canal or factitious river: also a ditch, dyke, trench, a channel for irrigation. Compounds such as ghṛtakulyā, madhukulyā, kṣīrakulyā, takrakulyā occur in gourmand-usage.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kulyā (कुल्या).—f A canal or factitious river. ghṛta kulyā, madhukulyā.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kulya (कुल्य).—a. [kula-yat]

1) Relating to a family, race, or corporation.

2) Well-born.

-lyaḥ A respectable man. °मातृबन्धुकुल्यगुणवत् सामन्तानामन्यतमेन° (mātṛbandhukulyaguṇavat sāmantānāmanyatamena°) Kau. A.1.17.

-lyam 1 Friendly inquiry after family affairs (condolence, congratulation &c.).

2) A bone; 'अस्थि कुल्यं स्यात् (asthi kulyaṃ syāt)' Ratna.; Mv.2.16.

3) Flesh.

4) A winnowing basket.

-lyā 1 A virtuous woman.

2) A small river, canal, stream; कुल्याम्भोभिः पवनचपलैः शाखिनो धौतमूलाः (kulyāmbhobhiḥ pavanacapalaiḥ śākhino dhautamūlāḥ) Ś.1.15; कुल्येवोद्यानपादपान् (kulyevodyānapādapān) R.12.3,7.49; U.3.23, शाल्यर्थं कुल्याः प्रणीयन्ते (śālyarthaṃ kulyāḥ praṇīyante) Mbh. on P.III.6.5.

3) A dike, trench.

4) A measure of grain equal to 8 droṇas.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kulya (कुल्य).—mfn.

(-lyaḥ-lyā-lyaṃ) 1. Of a good family, well-born, well descended. 2. Of or relating to a family or race. m.

(-lyaḥ) A counsellor. f.

(-lyā) 1. A river in general. 2. A canal, a channel for irrigation. 3. A ditch, a dyke or trench. 4. A drug or medicinal plant, (Celtis orientalis:) see jīvantī. 5. A chaste or virtuous woman, n.

(-lyaṃ) 1. A bone. 2. A measure of eight Dronas: see droṇa 3. A winnowing basket. 4. Flesh. 5. Friendly inquiry after family affairs or domestic accidents, condolence, congratulation, &c. E. kul to accumulate, and yat affix, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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