Kuluta, aka: Kulutā, Kulūta; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kuluta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

Kuluta in Kavya glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kulūta refers to an ancient district or cultural territory, as mentioned in the 7th-century Mudrārākṣasa written by Viśākhadeva. Kulūta corresponds to the Kullu valley.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kavya

Kulūta (कुलूत) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—This region is situated in the Uttarāpatha or northern India. It is refers to the modern Kulu in the Kāngrā district in the upper valley of the Bias in the Punjab. Its old capital was at Nagarkot, while Sultānpur or Sthānpur is its present headquarters.

Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

Kulūta (कुलूत) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.24.4, II.24.9, II.24.10, VI.10.52) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kulūta) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Kulutā (कुलुता) is the name of a sacred site (pīṭha) presided over by Mahāvīryā, according to the vārāhyabhyudaya-maṇḍala. It is also known as Kulatā. Mahāvīryā is a deity situated in one of the six petals of the southern lotus, of which the presiding deity is kuleśvarī (presiding lady) named Pāṇḍaravāsinī. The central deity of the vārāhyabhyudaya-maṇḍala is the twelve-armed Vajravarāhī.

Kulutā is one of the twenty-four pīṭhas, or ‘sacred-site’ (six lotuses each having six petals), each corresponding with a part of the human body. Kulutā is to be contemplated as situated in the knees. Besides being associated with a bodily spot, each pīṭha represents an actual place of ancient India frequented particularly by advanced tantric practitioners

The Vārāhyabhyudayatantra is an explanatory tantra on the Laghuśaṃvara, but its verses are largerly extracted from the 10th century Abhidhānottaratantra, a scriputre describing various sādhanas (path towards spiritual realization).

Source: Wisdomlib Libary: Vajrayogini
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geogprahy

Kulūta refers to one of the territories of tribes mentioned in the 7th-century Mudrārākṣasa.—Kulūta argues on the evidence of the Kādambarī and Harṣacarita of Bāṇa that Kulūta and Sindhu were flourishing in the times of Avantivarman Maukhari, whereas the latter was not even an independent state around the reign of Avantivarman of Kashmir.

Source: academia.edu: A Textual and Intertextual Study of the Mudrārākṣasa (history)
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kulūta (कुलूत).—(pl.) Name of a country and its rulers.

Derivable forms: kulūtaḥ (कुलूतः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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