Kulaka, Kūlaka, Kulakamtaka: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Kulaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

1) Kulaka (कुलक) is a Sanskrit word referring to Momordica charantia (bitter gourd), from the Cucurbitaceae family. It is also known as Khesārī. Certain plant parts of Kalāya are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Ayurvedic work. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”.

2) Kulaka (कुलक) is another name for Paṭola (Trichosanthes dioica, “pointed gourd”) according to the Bhāvaprakāśa, which is a 16th century medicinal thesaurus authored by Bhāvamiśra. The term is used throughout Ayurvedic literature. Certain plant parts of Paṭola are eaten as vegetables.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Kulaka [କୁଳକ] in the Odia language is the name of a plant identified with Strychnos nux-vomica L. from the Loganiaceae (Logania) family. For the possible medicinal usage of kulaka, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Kulaka (कुलक) is another name for Paṭola, a medicinal plant identified with Trichosanthes dioica (pointed gourd) from the Cucurbitaceae or “gourd family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.22-24 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Kulaka and Paṭola, there are a total of sixteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Kulaka (कुलक).—A class of people in Kuśadvīpa.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 20. 16.

1b) A son of Kṣudraka and father of Suratha.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 271. 13.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Kulaka (कुलक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.61) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kulaka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavyashastra (science of poetry)

Source: Shodhganga: Bhismacaritam a critical study

Kulaka (कुलक) (=kūlaka?) refers to a “combination of of more than four sentences” as employed in the Bhīṣmacarita (Bhishma Charitra) which is a mahākāvya (‘epic poem’) written by Hari Narayan Dikshit.—Madhusudan Mishra rightly observes that the poet is at liberty to choose his favourite metre to begin a canto, he also has to observe the restriction to continue it in spite of all odds. That is to say, sometimes the metre in hand may look too tiny before the elaborate ideas and the poet may face the situation of a square peg in round hole, but there is no alternative before the poet other than continuing the one at the beginning. The early poets must have felt such difficulties in their works, but soon they could have got through it by devising some tricks like yugma, sandanitaka, kalāpaka, kūlaka, etc. in which a number of stanzas are connected with one another as forming one sentence

Kavyashastra book cover
context information

Kavyashastra (काव्यशास्त्र, kāvyaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian tradition of poetry (kavya). Canonical literature (shastra) of the includes encyclopedic manuals dealing with prosody, rhetoric and various other guidelines serving to teach the poet how to compose literature.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kulaka (कुलक).—n S A number of stanzas, any number above four, connected by the construction, i. e. by protraction through them all of the government of the verb. See kālāpāka, yugma, viśēṣaka.

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kuḷaka (कुळक).—f ē or ī R (Commonly kuḷīka) A description of Cholera morbus.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kulaka (कुलक).—a. Of good family, of good birth.

-kaḥ 1 The chief of a guild.

2) Any artisan of eminent birth.

3) An ant-hill.

-kam 1 A collection, multitude. रोमपुलककुलकः (romapulakakulakaḥ) Bhāg.5.7.12.

2) A number of verses in grammatical connection; (the number of verses ranging from 5 to 15 and the whole forming one sentence); e. g. see Śi.1.4-1, R.1.5-9; so Ku.1.1-16.

3) A kind of prose composition with few compounds.

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Kūlaka (कूलक).—

1) Bank, shore.

2) A heap, mound.

-kaḥ An ant-hill.

Derivable forms: kūlakaḥ (कूलकः), kūlakam (कूलकम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Kūlaka (कूलक).—m., name of a mountain (= Utkūlaka, q.v.): Divyāvadāna 455.28 (= Kūjaka Mūla-Sarvāstivāda-Vinaya i.152.12).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kulaka (कुलक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) 1. Of a good family, of eminent birth. m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A species of ebony, (Diospyros tomentosa, Rox.) See kākendu. 2. An artist of eminent birth. 3. An ant or mole hill. 4. A green snake. n.

(-kaṃ) 1. A sort of gourd, (Trichosanthes diæca.) 2. The connexion of several stanzas, protraction of the government of the noun or verb through several verses, contrary to the practice of closing the sense with each verse. E. kan added to the preceding, or kula race, and ka who sounds. declares, &c.

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Kūlaka (कूलक).—m.

(-kaḥ) An ant hill. n.

(-kaṃ) 1. A mound of earth, a heap, a pile. 2. A bank, a dyke. E. kan added to the former.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kulaka (कुलक).—[kula + ka], n. A multitude, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 5, 7, 11.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kulaka (कुलक).—multitude (adj. —°); [neuter] three or more (lokas forming only one sentence.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kulaka (कुलक):—[from kula] n. ifc. a multitude, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa v, 7, 11]

2) [v.s. ...] the stone of a fruit, [Caraka]

3) [v.s. ...] a sort of gourd (Trichosanthes dioeca), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a collection of three or four ([Rājataraṅgiṇī]) or five ([Sāhitya-darpaṇa]) stanzas in which the government of verb and noun is carried throughout (contrary to the practice of closing the sense with each verse)

5) [v.s. ...] a kind of prose composition with few compound words

6) [v.s. ...] m. the chief of a guild, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] any artisan of eminent birth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] an ant-hill, mole-hill, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] a sort of mouse

10) [v.s. ...] a green snake, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] a kind of ebony (Diospyros tomentosa), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] another species of ebony (commonly Ku-pīlu), [Bhāvaprakāśa]

13) [v.s. ...] another plant (commonly maruvaka, śukla-puṣpa, tilaka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] m. [plural] Name of the Śūdras in Kuśa-dvīpa, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa v, 20, 16.]

15) Kūlaka (कूलक):—[from kūla] mn. a bank, shore, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

16) [v.s. ...] a mound, heap, tope, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) [v.s. ...] m. an ant-hill, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

18) [v.s. ...] Name of a mountain, [Divyāvadāna]

19) [v.s. ...] n. the plant Trichosanthes dioeca, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kulaka (कुलक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. Species of ebony; ant-hill; an artist. n. A gourd; connection through several stanzas. a. Of a good family.

2) Kūlaka (कूलक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. An ant-hill. 1. n. A mound of earth; a bank, a dyke; rear of an army.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kulaka (कुलक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Kulaya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kulaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kulaka (ಕುಲಕ):—

1) [noun] a man coming from or belonging to (such and such a family).

2) [noun] that which is related to one’s family, lineage.

3) [noun] the fact of belonging to, coming from a good family.

4) [noun] the tree Diospyros tomentosa of Ebenaceae family.

5) [noun] the plant Trichosanthes dioca of Cucurbitaceae family.

6) [noun] its gourd; wild snake gourd.

7) [noun] (rhet.) a group of verses that have grammatically, a single subject connected with several predicates.

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Kulakaṃṭaka (ಕುಲಕಂಟಕ):—[noun] a man who brings agony, great pain or shame to his family.

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Kuḷaka (ಕುಳಕ):—

1) [noun] a man coming from or belonging to (such and such a family).

2) [noun] that which is related to one’s family, lineage.

3) [noun] the fact of belonging to, coming from a good family.

4) [noun] the tree Diospyros tomentosa of Ebenaceae family.

5) [noun] the plant Trichosanthes dioca of Cucurbitaceae family.

6) [noun] its gourd; wild snake gourd.

7) [noun] (rhet.) a group of verses that have grammatically, a single subject connected with several predicates.

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Kūlaka (ಕೂಲಕ):—

1) [noun] the rising ground bordering a river; a bank.

2) [noun] a mound, pile or ridge raised above the surrounding level.

3) [noun] a nest built by ants or termites in the form of a mound; an ant-hill; ant heap.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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