Kukkuta, aka: Kukkuṭā, Kukkuṭa; 13 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kukkuta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

1) Kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “hen/cock/rooster”. The meat of this animal is part of the māṃsavarga (‘group of flesh’), which is used throughout Āyurvedic literature. It is also known by the names Caraṇāyudha and Dakṣa. The animal Kukkuṭa is part of the group of birds named Vartakādi, which is a sub-group of Viṣkira, refering to “birds similar to common quail who eat while scattering the gains”. It was classified by Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic properties of the substance.

The meat of Cocks (caraṇāyudha) is unctuous, hot, aphrodisiac, bulk-promoting, voice-awakening and tonic. It excells at alleviating vāta. It is diaphorectic. The eggs of the Hen (dakṣa) are useful in diminished semen, cough, heart disease and injuries. They are sweet, bot cauising burning sensation and immediately strength-promoting.

2) Kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट) is another name (synonym) for Śitāvarī, which is a Sanskrit name for a plant. This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 5.50-51), which is an Āyurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट)—Sanskrit word for a bird corresponding to “cock” (Galloperdix sp.). This animal is from the group called Viṣkira (which scatter). Viṣkira itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Jāṅghala (living in high ground and in a jungle).

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Kukkuṭā (कुक्कुटा):—One of the sixty-eight Rasauṣadhi, very powerful drugs known to be useful in alchemical processes related to mercury (rasa), according to Rasaprakāśa-sudhākara (chapter 9).

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana

Kukkuta in Purana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट) is the name of a gaṇa (attendant of Śiva), mentioned in the Skandapurāṇa 4.2.53. In this chapter, Śiva (Giriśa) summons his attendants (gaṇas) and ask them to venture towards the city Vārāṇasī (Kāśī) in order to find out what the yoginīs, the sun-god, Vidhi (Brahmā) were doing there.

While the gaṇas such as Kukkuṭa were staying at Kāśī, they were desirous but unable of finding a weakness in king Divodaśa who was ruling there. Kāśī is described as a fascinating place beyond the range of Giriśa’s vision, and as a place where yoginīs become ayoginīs, after having come in contact with it. Kāśī is described as having both the power to destroy great delusion, as well as creating it.

The Skandapurāṇa narrates the details and legends surrounding numerous holy pilgrimages (tīrtha-māhātmya) throughout India. It is the largest Mahāpurāṇa composed of over 81,000 metrical verses, with the core text dating from the before the 4th-century CE.

Source: Wisdom Library: Skanda-purāṇa

Kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट).—The banner of Skanda, presented to him by Vāyu: the standard of Kumāra;1 śrāddha piṇḍa;2 killer of, goes to hell.3 Cock crying in pradoṣa time is bad to the place.4

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 72. 45. a cock not to be fed with.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 455; 10. 47; 12. 34; 14. 48; 19. 44; Matsya-purāṇa 260. 50.
  • 3) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 2. 165; 24. 50; Vāyu-purāṇa 101. 163.
  • 4) Matsya-purāṇa 237. 5.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

Kukkuta in Itihasa glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.74) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kukkuṭa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट, “cock”) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The śilpa texts have classified the various accessories under the broad heading of āyudha or karuvi (implement), including even flowers, animals, and musical instruments. The representations of certain animals and birds are generally found in the hands of images. They are, for example, Kukkuṭa.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

1. Kukkuta - One of three bankers of Kosambi, the others being Ghosaka and Pavariya. Having heard from some ascetics, whom they had entertained, of the appearance of the Buddha, they went with these ascetics to Savatthi, each carrying offerings in five hundred carts. Having heard the Buddha preach, they became sotapannas. They gave alms to the Buddha for a fortnight, and then, with his permission, returned to Kosambi. They built monasteries in their gardens for the use of the Buddha and his monks, that built by Kukkuta being called the Kukkutarama. The Buddha stayed one day at a time in each monastery, and on that day accepted the hospitality of its founder. DA.i.318f; DhA.i.203ff; AA.i.234f; PsA.414.

It is said (MA.i.540f) that the bankers built a monastery for each league on the road between Savatthi and Kosambi for the use of the Buddha during his journeys.

2. Kukkuta - A frontier town near Himava; the capital of a kingdom three hundred leagues in extent, where Maha Kappina once ruled. There were three rivers to cross on the way from Kukkuta to Savatthi (ThagA.i.507f; Ap.ii.469). See also Kukkutavati.

3. Kukkuta - A rock near Himava. Seven Pacceka Buddhas once lived there. ThagA.i.216; Ap.i.178.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Kukkuta (कुक्कुत, “cock”) represents an incarnation destination of the tiryaggati (animal realm) according to the “world of transmigration” section in the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XXVII).—The Bodhisattva sees the animals (tiryak) undergoing all the torments: they are made to gallop by blows of the whip or stick; they are made to make long journeys carrying burdens; their harness is damaged; they are branded with hot iron. If sensual desires (kāmarāga), passion and ignorance (avidyā) were predominant in them [people], they are reborn as [for example] cock (kukkuta); thus they become one of the hundred thousand kinds of birds. If they are guilty of lust, their body becomes covered with hairs and feathers; their plumage is fine and smooth; their beak, big and wide; thus they cannot distinguish touch (sparśa) and taste (rasa).

Also, if they have deceived honest people (sajjanāvamāna), they take the body of [for example], a rooster (kukkuṭa).

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Kukkuta in Pali glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

kukkuṭa : (m.) a cock.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Kukkuṭa, (Sk. kurkuṭa & kukkuṭa; onomatopoetic=Lat. cucurio, Ger. kikeriki) a cock Miln. 363; J. IV, 58; VvA. 163; f. kukkuṭī a hen DhA. I, 48; ThA. 255; in simile M. I, 104=357=A. IV, 125 sq. , 176 sq. (cp. °potako).

—aṇḍa (kukkuṭ°) a hen’s egg Vism. 261. —patta the wing of a cock A. IV, 47. —potaka a chicken, in simile M. I, 104=357=A. IV, 126=176. —yuddha a cock fight D. I, 6; —lakkhaṇa divining by means of a cock D. I, 9; —sampātika a shower of hot ashes (cock as symbol of fire) A. I, 159=D. III, 75, cp. Divy 316 and see Morris, J. P. T. S. 1885, 38; —sūkarā (pl.) cocks and pigs D. I, 5= A. II, 209=Pug. 58; D. I, 141; A. II, 42 sq.; It. 36. (Page 218)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Kukkuta in Marathi glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट).—m S The farm or domestic cock. 2 A wild cock.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kukkuṭa (कुक्कुट).—1 A cock, wild cock.

2) A wisp of lighted straw, a firebrand.

3) A spark of fire.

-ṭī 1 A hen.

2) A small house-lizard.

3) The silk-cotton tree.

Derivable forms: kukkuṭaḥ (कुक्कुटः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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