Kollagiri, Kolla-giri: 4 definitions

Introduction

Kollagiri means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (K) next»] — Kollagiri in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Kollagiri (कोल्लगिरि) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—Coorg is situated now in the Mysore state. The Kāverī River rises from this place. It is also well-known by the name Kolagiri or Kodagu.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (K) next»] — Kollagiri in Purana glossary
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Kollagiri (कोल्लगिरि) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.28.45) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kolla-giri) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)

Kollagiri (कोल्लगिरि) refers to one of the twenty-four sacred districts mentioned in the 9th century Vajraḍākatantra (chapter 18). These districts are not divided into subgroups, nor are explained their internal locations. They [viz., Kollagiri] are external holy places, where the Tantric meting is held with native women who are identified as a native goddess. A similar system appears in the tradition of Hindu Tantrims, i.e., in the Kubjikāmatatantra (chapter 22), which belongs to the Śākta sect or Śaivism.

Kollagiri is presided over by the Goddess (Devī) named Mahālakṣmī [or Jvālāmukhī] accompanied by the Field-protector (Kṣetrapāla) named Aghnimukha [or Mahāvrata]. Their weapon possibly corresponds to the khaḍga and their abode (residence) is mentioned as being “top of the mountain” or the nimba-tree.

Note: In the Kubjikāmatatantra, the name is spelled as Kolāgiri and the associated Field-protector (Kṣetrapāla) is mentioned as Agnika. Their weapon is the daṇḍa and their abode is the naga-tree

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Wisdom Library: India History

Kollagiri (कोल्लगिरि) is the name of a country included within Dakṣiṇapatha which was situated ahead of Māhiṣmatī according to Rājaśekhara (fl. 10th century) in his Kāvyamīmāṃsā (chapter 17). Dakṣiṇāpatha is a place-name ending is patha mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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