Kamari, Kāmari, Kāmāri, Kamarī, Kama-ari, Kamārī: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Kamari means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, biology, Tamil. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (shilpa)

1) Kāmāri (कामारि) or Kāmārimūrti refers to one of the twenty-eighth forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Vātulāgama: twenty-eighth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgama. The forms of Śiva (e.g., Kāmāri) are established through a process known as Sādākhya, described as a five-fold process of creation.

2) Kāmāri is also listed among the sixteen forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Dīptāgama: the sixth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgamas.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Kāmāri (कामारि) refers to one of the eight Bhairavas (bhairava-aṣṭaka) associated with Tisrapīṭha (located in the ‘end of sound’—nādānta), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—[...] The eight Bhairavas (bhairavāṣṭaka): Candragarbha, Arghīśa, Mahānanda, Kāmāri, Pralamba, Viśveśvara, Śrīkaṇṭha, Vilamba.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Toxicology (Study and Treatment of poison)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa

Kamarī (कमरी) refers to one of the four fangs of a snake (Daṃṣṭraka), as taught in the Nāgajanman (“birth of the Snakes”) section of the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā: an ancient Sanskrit text from the Pāñcarātra tradition dealing with both Tantra and Viṣacikitsā—an important topic from Āyurveda which deals with the study of Toxicology (Agadatantra or Sarpavidyā).—After 52 days, four fangs, namely Kālī, Karālī, Kamarī and Kālarātrī make their appearance on the left and right sides which are the receptacle of venom.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Kāmāri (कामारि) is mentioned as another name for Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.5.2 (“The Prayer of the gods).—Accordingly, as the Gods eulogized Śiva: “[...] Obeisance to Thee, O lord, Hṛṣīkeśa, Acyuta, Mṛḍa, Śaṅkara, Adhokṣaja, enemy of the Asuras, Gaja and Kāma. Obeisance to you, O partaker of poison. Obeisance to Thee, O lord Nārāyaṇa, devoted to Nārāyaṇa, of the form of Nārāyaṇa, oh! one born of Nārāyaṇa’s body. Obeisance to Thee of all forms, the destroyer of great hells, destroyer of sins. Obeisance to you, O bull-vehicled god. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: Wisdom Library: Teachers, Saints and Sages

Kamari (कमरि) or Kamaripā is another name for Kamaripā: one of the eighty-four Siddhas (Siddhācāryas) of the Sahajayāna school, according to sources such as the Varṇaratnākara of Jyotirīśvara (i.e., the Varna-Ratnakara by Jyotirishwar Thakur).—The Sahaja-Yana is a philosophical and esoteric movement of Tantric Buddhism which had enormous influence in the Indian subcontinent and the Himalayas.—Many of these Mahāsiddhas [e.g., Kamari-pā] were historical figures whose lives and mystical powers were the subject of legends. They are often associated with teachings belonging to Hinduism, Buddhism, Ajivikism and Jainism such as the Nath Tradition.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Kamari in India is the name of a plant defined with Cissus setosa in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Cyphostemma setosum (Roxb.) Alston.

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Flora Indica
· Hortus Bengalensis, or ‘a Catalogue of the Plants Growing in the Hounourable East India Company's Botanical Garden at Calcutta’ (1814)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Kamari, for example side effects, diet and recipes, extract dosage, pregnancy safety, health benefits, chemical composition, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
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This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kamarī (कमरी).—a (kamara) Strained or weakened in the loins.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kāmāri (कामारि).—

1) an epithet of Śiva; ते समेत्य तु कामारिं त्रिपुरारिं त्रिलोचनम् (te sametya tu kāmāriṃ tripurāriṃ trilocanam) Rām.7.6.3.

2) a mineral substance.

Derivable forms: kāmāriḥ (कामारिः).

Kāmāri is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kāma and ari (अरि).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāmāri (कामारि).—m.

(-riḥ) A mineral substance used in medicine, a sort of pyrites: see viṭmākṣika. E. kāma love, and ari an enemy.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāmāri (कामारि).—[masculine] the foe of Kāma ([Epithet] of Śiva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kāmāri (कामारि):—[from kāma] m. ‘love’s adversary’, Name of Śiva, [Rāmāyaṇa vii, 6, 31; Prasannarāghava]

2) [v.s. ...] a mineral substance used in medicine, a sort of pyrites (= viṭa-māṣika), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kāmāri (कामारि):—[kāmā+ri] (riḥ) 1. m. A mineral substance used in medicine.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kamari in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kamari (ಕಮರಿ):—[noun] the steeply inclined land by the side of a mountain.

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Kāmāri (ಕಾಮಾರಿ):—[noun] Śiva, the enemy of Kāma.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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