Sadakhya, aka: Sādākhya; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sadakhya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Sadakhya in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Sādākhya (सादाख्य).—The process of assuming the form by the transcendental god is termed as Sādākhya in Śaiva school of thought. The Tattvabhedapaṭala of Vātulāgama elaborately describes the process of Sādākhya and the Śaivotpattipaṭala of Rauravāgama describes the same process in a short manner. The Sakalaniṣkala form is known as Sādākhya, which is fivefold. Śiva with all these five is called Sadāśiva.

The five Sādākhyas are:

  1. Śivasādākhya,
  2. Amūrtasādākhya,
  3. Mūrtasādākhya,
  4. Kartṛsādākhya,
  5. Karmasādākhya.
Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 165 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kartrisadakhya
Kartṛsādākhya (कर्तृसादाख्य) refers to the first of the five Sādākhya in Śaiva school of though...
Karmasadakhya
Karmasādākhya (कर्मसादाख्य) refers to the first of the five Sādākhya in Śaiva school of thought...
Shivasadakhya
Śivasādākhya (शिवसादाख्य) refers to the first of the five Sādākhya in Śaiva school of thought (...
Murtasadakhya
Mūrtasādākhya (मूर्तसादाख्य) refers to the first of the five Sādākhya in Śaiva school of though...
Amurtasadakhya
Amūrtasādākhya (अमूर्तसादाख्य) refers to the first of the five Sādākhya in Śaiva school of thou...
Amurttasadakhya
Amūrttasādākhya (अमूर्त्तसादाख्य):—One of the Sadāśiva-tatvas that is produced from a ...
Murttasadakhya
Mūrttasādākhya (मूर्त्तसादाख्य):—One of the Sadāśiva-tatvas that is produced from a te...
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