Ikshana, Īkṣaṇa: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Ikshana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Īkṣaṇa can be transliterated into English as Iksana or Ikshana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण) refers to “eyes”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult. Accordingly, “O goddess, Svacchanda is in the middle, within the abode of the triangle. Very powerful, he has five faces with three times five flaming eyes. [...] O beautiful lady, this, the western one, is yellow like vermillion mixed with musk. Divine, it generates great energy. (The southern face) is somewhat fierce with large sharp teeth and long red eyes [i.e., rakta-āyata-īkṣaṇa]. It is blue like a blue lotus and blue collyrium. Beautiful and fierce, he wears a gem and a snake and his hair is brown. He is called Aghora, contemplating (him) he bestows success in every enterprise”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण) refers to the “eyes”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, while describing Trikhaṇḍā: “[...] She has three sections, three faces, a divine form and large belly. [...] (The second face) is dark like a storm cloud and the eyes red as blood [i.e., raktāruṇa-nibha-īkṣaṇa]. It has fierce fangs and is adorned with snakes for earrings. The expression is mildly fierce and a skull (adorns) the topknot on the head. The third face is on the left. It is yellow and red and shines with brilliant rays, its light (pure) divine radiant energy. It is beautiful with many gems and the ears are adorned with earrings. It bears a radiantly brilliant diadem and crown”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण) refers to the “eyes”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I worship the three-eyed (tri-īkṣaṇa) sharp-natured Kṣetreśa. His body is black, he has destroyed his adversaries, he carries a skull-bowl and a spear, [but] he is compassionate. I resort to Śaṅkhanidhi and Padmanidhi, who who sit upon a conch and lotus [respectively] as their seats. They are patient, bear the gestures of generosity and protection in their hands, and bring about everyone’s dreams. [...]

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण) refers to the “eyes”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.12.—Accordingly, after Himācala (i.e., Himālaya) brought his daughter (Pārvatī) before Śiva: “Then Śiva looked at her in the first flush of her youth. [...] On seeing Śiva the lord of all, the chief of those devoted to penance, the lord with the moon as his ornament, who can be known through spiritual insight and who was sitting in the meditative posture closing His eyes [i.e., vi-nimīlita-īkṣaṇa], Himācala saluted Him again. Though he was not disheartened, he entertained some doubts. Thus he, the lord of mountains, foremost of the eloquent, spoke to Śiva, the sole kinsman of the universe”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण) refers to the “eyes”, according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “One desirous of a kingdom, one who has been deprived of it or one conquered by [other] rulers, after having paid respect with large masses of wealth to the supreme Guru, the giver of Sudarśana’s Yantra, considering [him] superior to all, should propitiate God Nārāyaṇa—who has large eyes like lotuses (puṇḍarīka-āyata-īkṣaṇa), is [of] dark [complexion], clad in a yellow garment, adorned with all ornaments and with four arms - following the rules given by the teacher. [...]”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Ganitashastra (Mathematics and Algebra)

Source: archive.org: Hindu Mathematics

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण) represents the number 2 (two) in the “word-numeral system” (bhūtasaṃkhyā), which was used in Sanskrit texts dealing with astronomy, mathematics, metrics, as well as in the dates of inscriptions and manuscripts in ancient Indian literature.—A system of expressing numbers by means of words arranged as in the place-value notation was developed and perfected in India in the early centuries of the Christian era. In this system the numerals [e.g., 2—īkṣaṇa] are expressed by names of things, beings or concepts, which, naturally or in accordance with the teaching of the Śāstras, connote numbers.

Ganitashastra book cover
context information

Ganitashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, gaṇitaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science of mathematics, algebra, number theory, arithmetic, etc. Closely allied with astronomy, both were commonly taught and studied in universities, even since the 1st millennium BCE. Ganita-shastra also includes ritualistic math-books such as the Shulba-sutras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण).—n S Seeing or sight. 2 An eye.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण).—n Seeing or sight; an eye.


context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण).—[īkṣ-lyuṭ]

1) Seeing, beholding &c.

2) A look, sight, aspect, view.

3) An eye; अश्रुपूर्णाकुलेक्षणम् (aśrupūrṇākulekṣaṇam) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 2.1. इत्यद्रिशोभाप्रहितेक्षणेन (ityadriśobhāprahitekṣaṇena) R.2.27; so अलसेक्षणा (alasekṣaṇā).

4) Regarding, looking after, caring for.

-śravas m. A serpant; एषा नो नैष्ठिकी बुद्धिः सर्वेषामीक्षणश्रवः (eṣā no naiṣṭhikī buddhiḥ sarveṣāmīkṣaṇaśravaḥ) Mahābhārata (Bombay) 1.37.29.

Derivable forms: īkṣaṇam (ईक्षणम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण).—n.

(-ṇaṃ) 1. Sight, seeing. 2. An eye. E. īkṣ to see, lyuṭ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण).—i. e. īkṣ + ana, n. 1. Sight, [Kathāsaritsāgara, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 18, 300. 2. Care, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 7, 141; superintendence, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 9, 11. 3. The eye, [Hiḍimbavadha] 3, 20.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण).—[neuter] look, view, aspect, eye; looking after, caring for ([genetive]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण):—[from īkṣ] n. a look, view, aspect sight, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Lāṭyāyana; Kathāsaritsāgara; Pañcatantra; Ratnāvalī] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] regarding, looking after, caring for, [Manu-smṛti]

3) [v.s. ...] eye, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Suśruta; Śakuntalā etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण):—(ṇaṃ) 1. n. Sight; an eye.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Īkṣaṇa (ईक्षण) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ikkhaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ikshana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Īkṣaṇa (ಈಕ್ಷಣ):—

1) [noun] the organ of sight in human or animals.

2) [noun] the act of seeing; perception by the eyes; a seeing; sight.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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