Arupyadhatu, aka: Arupya-dhatu, Ārūpyadhātu; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Arupyadhatu means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[Arupyadhatu in Mahayana glossaries]

Ārūpyadhātu (आरूप्यधातु) refers to the “gods of the formless realm” according to the “world of transmigration” section in the Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XXVII).—The gods of the formless realm (ārūpyadhātu), who enjoy the absorptions (samāpatti) and are attached to them, do not understand that when their life is over they will fall back into the desire realm and will take on the form of a bird or animal.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of arupyadhatu in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

[Arupyadhatu in Buddhism glossaries]

Ārūpyadhātu (आरूप्यधातु, “formless realm”) belongs to those Devas who attained and remained in the four formless absorptions (catuḥ-samāpatti) of the arūpadhyānas in a previous life, and now enjoys the fruits (vipāka) of the good karma of that accomplishment. Bodhisattvas, however, are never born in the Ārūpyadhātu even when they have attained the arūpadhyānas.

There are four types of Ārūpyadhātu-devas, corresponding to the four types of arūpadhyānas:

  1. Naivasaṃjñānāsaṃjñāyatana or Nevasaññānāsaññāyatana,
  2. Ākiṃcanyāyatana or Ākiñcaññāyatana,
  3. Vijñānānantyāyatana or Viññāṇānañcāyatana or Viññāṇañcāyatana.
  4. Ākāśānantyāyatana or Ākāsānañcāyatana.
(Source): WikiPedia: Buddhism

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