Aru, Āru, Ārū: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Aru means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Āru (आरु).—kṛt. affix applied to the roots शृ (śṛ) and वन्द् (vand) in the sense of habituated etc. e.g. शरारुः, वन्दारुः (śarāruḥ, vandāruḥ), cf P. III. 2.173.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Aru (अरु):—Ulcer

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

aru : (nt.) an old wound; a sore.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Aru, (nt.) (Vedic aruḥ, unknown etym. ) a wound, a sore, only in cpds. : °kāya a heap of sores M. II, 64 = Dh. 147 = Th. 1, 769 (= navannaṃ vaṇamukhānaṃ vasena arubhūta kāya DhA. III, 109 = VvA. 77); °gatta (adj.) with wounds in the body M. I, 506 (+ pakka-gatta); Miln. 357 (id); °pakka decaying with sores S. IV, 198 (°āni gattāni); °bhūta consisting of wounds, a mass of wounds VvA. 77 = DhA. III, 109. (Page 78)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aru (अरु).—

1) The sun.

2) Name of a plant (raktakhadira).

Derivable forms: aruḥ (अरुः).

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Āru (आरु).—2 P.

1) To cry out, shout; Bk.17.24, to low (as cows).

2) To praise.

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Āru (आरु).—[ṛ-uṇ]

1) A hog.

2) A crab.

3) Name of a tree.

-ruḥ f. A pitcher.

Derivable forms: āruḥ (आरुः).

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Ārū (आरू).—a. Of a tawny colour.

-rū m.

1) The tawny colour.

2) A hog; a crab; see आरु (āru).

3) Name of a medicinal plant on the Himālaya.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Āru (आरु).—m.

(-ruḥ) 1. The name of a tree, (Lagerstrœmia regina.) 2. A crab. 3. A hog. 4. A pitcher. E. to go, uṇ affix, the pen. made long.

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Ārū (आरू).—mfn. (-rūḥ-rūḥ-ru) Of a tawny colour. m.

(-rūḥ) Tawny, (the colour.) E. to go, ū aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aru (अरु).—(°—) = arus [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aru (अरु):—a m. the sun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) the red-blossomed Khadira tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) for arus n. only in [compound] with -ṃ-tuda

4) [from arus] b See sub voce

5) Āru (आरु):—[=ā-ru] 1. ā-√1. ru [Parasmaipada] -rauti or -ravīti ([imperative] ā-ruva, [Ṛg-veda i, 10, 4]) to shout or cry towards;

—to cry out, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Rāmāyaṇa; Bhaṭṭi-kāvya];

—to praise, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] :

—[Intensive] -roravīti, to roar towards or against, [Ṛg-veda]

6) 2. āru m. a hog

7) a crab

8) the tree Lagerstroemia Regina, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) f. a pitcher, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Ārū (आरू):—mfn. (√ [Uṇādi-sūtra i, 87]), tawny

11) m. (ūs) tawny (the colour), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Āru (आरु):—(ruḥ) 1. m. (Lagerstroemia regina); a crab; a hog; a pitcher.

2) Ārū (आरू):—[(rūḥ-ru) a.] Tawny.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Aru (अरु):—1. = arus, vgl. aruṃtuda und pākāru .

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Aru (अरु):—2. m.

1) Sonne [Uṇādikoṣa im Śabdakalpadruma] —

2) Name einer Pflanze (raktakhadira) [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma] — Vgl. aruṇa .

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Āru (आरु):—

1) m. a) Eber. — b) Krebs. — c) Name einer Baumes (Lagerstroemia regina Roxb. nach [Wilson’s Wörterbuch]) [Medinīkoṣa Rāmāyaṇa 8.] —

2) f. Wasserkrug (s. ālu) [Scholiast] zu [Amarakoṣa 2, 9, 31.]

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Ārū (आरू):—adj. lohfarben (piṅgala) [Die Uṇādi-Affixe 1, 85.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Aru (अरु):—1. = arus in aruṃtuda.

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Aru (अरु):—2. m.

1) die Sonne.

2) roth blühender Khadira.

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Arū (अरू):—Adv. mit kar verwunden.

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Āru (आरु):——

1) m. — a) Eber. — b) Krebs. — c) eine best. Pflanze.

2) f. Wasserkrug.

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Ārū (आरू):—Adj. lohfarben.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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