Aharaka, Āhāraka: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Aharaka means something in Jainism, Prakrit, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 6: Influx of karmas

Āhāraka (आहारक).—One of the seven types kāyayoga (body activities);—What is meant by ‘conveyance’ (āhāraka-kāyayoga)? The vibrations of the space-points of the soul caused by the conveyance body are called āhāraka kāyayoga or conveyance body activities.

What is the maximum duration of the conveyance body? The maximum period of existence for a conveyance body is inter-Indian-hour (antarmuhurta) i.e. less than 48 minutes.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 2: the Category of the living

1) Āhāraka (आहारक, “assimilative”).—What is the meaning of assimilative (āhāraka) and non-assimilative (anāhāraka)? Assimilation of matter particles for three kinds of matter bodies, namely physical or gross of human and subhuman beings, celestial for heavenly and hellish beings and conveyance emanating out of saints with high purity to attain six kinds of completions/ mature-organs (paryāptis) is called assimilative. Non assimilation of these is called non-assimilative.

When does the empirical soul become assimilative (āhāraka) in the transitory state? It can exist as non-assimilative (anāhāraka) for a period of one to a maximum of three time-instants and then in the maximum of fourth time-instant it becomes assimilative.

2) Āhāraka (आहारक, “assimilative”) refers to the “conveyance body” and represents one of the five types of human ‘bodies’ (śarīra) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 2.36. What is the meaning of conveyance body? The white coloured small body which emanates from the forehead of a saint with high spiritual purity (6th guṇasthāna) to resolve doubts or ascertain the subtle philosophical matter is called conveyance body.

Why is the conveyance body (āhāraka) said to be auspicious only? It is auspicious as it originates due to the auspicious karma conveyance-body-making-karma (āhāraka nāma karma). Why the conveyance body is called pure also? As it is the cause of a pure action /activity, it is called as pure. Why is the conveyance body called without impediments? Since it cannot be obstructed by any type of matter entity, it is called without impediments.

What is the form of the conveyance body (āhāraka)? It is white like a swan, of the size of approximately one hand, all beautiful, devoid of the seven gross body making matter types, free from impediments like fire / pillars / poison, or rocks /mountains, water and capable of fast movement. It emanates from the forehead of the ascetic and returns back to the ascetic after touching the feet of an omniscient.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 8: Bondage of karmas

1) Āhāraka (आहारक) refers to “conveyance body” and represents one of the five types of Śarīra (body), which  represents one of the various kinds of Nāma, or “physique-making (karmas)”, which represents one of the eight types of Prakṛti-bandha (species bondage): one of the four kinds of bondage (bandha) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra chapter 8. What is meant by conveyance (āhāraka) body (śarīra) body-making (nāma) karma? The karmas rise of which causes attainment of a conveyance body by the soul are called conveyance body body-making karma. Such bodies are achieved by ascetics with very high spiritual purification to transmit this red coloured body from their forehead to the omniscient lords for resolving mystical problems.

2) Āhāraka (आहारक, “conveyance”) refers to “conveyance major/minor limbs body-making karma” and represents one of the three types of Aṅgopāṅga (major/minor limbs), representing one of the various kinds of Nāma, or “physique-making (karmas)”, which represents one of the eight types of Prakṛti-bandha (species bondage): one of the four kinds of bondage (bandha) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra chapter 8. What is meant by conveyance (āhāraka) major/minor limbs (aṅgopāṅga) body-making (nāma) karma? The karmas rise of which causes the formation of right form, size and at the right place of major and minor limbs of a conveyance body by the soul are called conveyance body formation karma. 

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of aharaka in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Āhāraka (आहारक).—a. Going to fetch or bring; एधानाहारको व्रजति (edhānāhārako vrajati) Sk.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Āhāraka (आहारक).—m., in Mahāvyutpatti 3851, according to Tibetan sñod ciṅ stobs pa, which seems to mean someone concerned with food; so also Chin. Prob. this is etymological guesswork (Sanskrit āhāra). Certainly it refers to some member of a ship's crew; see āhāra, āharaṇa; perhaps one who tows (or otherwise propels?) a boat, as in Pali āharitvā (nāvaṃ) Jātaka (Pali) iv.159.16.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Āhāraka (आहारक):—[from ā-hṛ] mfn. bringing near, procuring, fetching [commentator or commentary] on [Pāṇini] (cf. kṛtāhāra-ka.)

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Āhāraka (आहारक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Āhāraga.

[Sanskrit to German]

Aharaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of aharaka in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Āhāraka (ಆಹಾರಕ):—

1) [noun] (Jain.) one of the five bodies of the soul; a minute form issuing from the head of a meditative sage to consult an omniscient saint and returning with the desired information.

2) [noun] any creature that lives on food.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of aharaka in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Let's grow together!

I humbly request your help to keep doing what I do best: provide the world with unbiased sources, definitions and images. Your donation direclty influences the quality and quantity of knowledge, wisdom and spiritual insight the world is exposed to.

Let's make the world a better place together!

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: