Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Second recitation section

The story of Anāthapiṇḍika

Now at that time the householder Anāthapiṇḍika was the husband of a sister of a (great) merchant of Rājagaha. Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika went to Rājagaha on some business or other. At that time the Order with the Awakened One at its head had been invited for the morrow by the (great) BD.5.217 merchant of Rājagaha. Then the (great) merchant of Rājagaha enjoined slaves and servants, saying: “Well now, good people, getting up early in the morning, cook conjeys, cook rice,[1] prepare[2] curries, prepare vegetables.”[3] Then it occurred to the householder Anāthapiṇḍika: “Now, on my arrival formerly this householder, having put aside all duties, did nothing except exchange greetings with me, but now he seems excited and enjoins slaves and servants, saying: ‘Well now, good people … Vin.2.155 prepare vegetables.’ Now can there be for this householder a leading to[4] (a bride’s home) or can there be a leading away from[5] (a bride’s home) or is a great oblation arranged or is King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha invited for the morrow together with his troops?”

Kd.16.4.2 Then the (great) merchant of Rājagaha, having enjoined the slaves and servants, approached the householder Anāthapiṇḍika; having approached, having exchanged greetings with the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, he sat down at a respectful distance. The householder Anāthapiṇḍika spoke thus to the (great) merchant of Rājagaha as he was sitting down at a respectful distance: “Formerly you, householder, on my arrival, having put aside all duties, did nothing except exchange greetings with me, but now you seem excited and enjoin slaves and servants, saying: ‘Well now, good people … prepare vegetables.’ Now can there be for you, householder, a leading to … or is King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha invited for the morrow together with his troops?”

“There is to be for me, householder, neither a leading to (a bride’s home), nor is there to be a leading away from (a bride’s home), nor is King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha invited for the morrow together with his troops. But a great oblation is arranged by me: the Order is invited for the morrow with the Awakened One at its head.”

“Did you, householder, say ‘Awakened One?’”

“‘Awakened One’ I did say, householder.”

“Did you, householder, say ‘Awakened One’?”

BD.5.218 “‘Awakened One’ I did say, householder.”

“Did you, householder, say ‘Awakened One’?”

“‘Awakened One’ I did say, householder.”

“Even this sound, householder, is hard to come by in the world, that is to say ‘Awakened One, Awakened One.’ Now would it be possible, householder, at this time[6] to go up and see this Lord, a perfected one, a fully Self-awakened One?”

“This time is not a right time, householder, to go up and see this Lord, a perfected one, a fully Self-awakened One. But now, early Tomorrow you shall go up to see this Lord, a perfected one, a fully Self-awakened One.”

Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, thinking: “Early Tomorrow I will go up to see this Lord … fully Self-Awakened One,” lay down with mindfulness (so much) directed to the Awakened One,[7] that he got up three times during the night thinking it was daybreak.

Kd.16.4.3 Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika approached the gateway to the Cool Grove,[8] and non-human beings opened the gateway. Then as the householder Anāthapiṇḍika was going out from the town, light vanished, darkness appeared; fear, consternation, Vin.2.156 hair standing on end[9] arose so that he was desirous of turning back from there. Then the yakkha Sīvaka, invisible, made this sound heard:

“A hundred elephants,[10] a hundred horses, a hundred chariots with she-mules,[11]
A hundred thousand maidens adorned with jewelled earrings—
These are not worth the sixteenth part of one length of stride.
Advance, householder, advance, householder.
Advance is better for you, not retreat.”

Then darkness vanished for the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, light appeared, so that his fear, consternation, hair standing on end subsided. And a second time … And a third time BD.5.219 did the yakkha Sīvaka made this sound heard: “… Advance is better for you, not retreat.” And a third time darkness vanished for the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, light appeared, so that his fear, consternation, hair standing on end subsided.

Kd.16.4.4 Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika approached the Cool Grove. Now at that time the Lord was pacing up and down in the open air, having got up in the night towards dawn. Then the Lord saw the householder Anāthapiṇḍika coming in the distance; seeing him, having stepped down from the place for pacing up and down in, he sat down on an appointed seat, and sitting down the Lord spoke thus to the householder Anāthapiṇḍika: “Come, Sudatta.”[12] Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, thinking: “The Lord addressed me by name,” joyful, elated, approached the Lord; having approached, having inclined his head to the Lord’s feet, he spoke thus to the Lord: “I hope, Lord, that the Lord is living at ease.” He said:

“Yes, always at ease he lives, the brahmin, attained to nibbāna,
Who is not stained by lusts,[13] cooled, without attachments.[14]
Having rent all clingings, having averted heart’s care,
Tranquil he lives at ease, having won to peace of mind.”[15]

Kd.16.4.5 Then the Lord talked a progressive talk[16] to the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, that is to say talk on giving, talk on moral habit, talk on heaven, he explained the peril, the vanity, the depravity of pleasures of the senses, the advantage in renouncing (them). When the Lord knew that the mind of the householder Anāthapiṇḍika was ready, malleable, devoid of BD.5.220 the hindrances, uplifted, pleased, then he explained to him that teaching on dhamma which the awakened ones have themselves discovered: ill, uprising, stopping, the Way. And as a clean Vin.2.157 cloth without black specks will easily take dye, even so as he was (sitting) on that very seat, dhamma-vision, dustless, stainless, arose to the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, that “whatever is liable to uprising, all that is liable to stopping.” Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, having seen dhamma, attained dhamma, known dhamma, plunged into dhamma, having crossed over doubt, having put away uncertainty, having attained without another’s help to full confidence in the Teacher’s instruction, spoke thus to the Lord:

“Excellent, Lord! Excellent, Lord! Even, Lord, as one might set upright what has been upset, or might uncover what was concealed, or might show the way to one who is astray, or might bring an oil lamp into the darkness, thinking, ‘Those with eyes to see may see shapes,’ even so is dhamma explained in many a figure by the Lord. I myself, Lord, go to the Lord for refuge, to dhamma, and to the Order of monks. May the Lord accept me as a lay-disciple going for refuge from this day forth for as long as life lasts. And, Lord, may the Lord consent to a meal with me on the morrow together with the Order of monks.” The Lord consented by becoming silent. Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, having understood the Lord’s consent, rising from his seat, having greeted the Lord, departed keeping his right side towards him.

Kd.16.4.6 The (great) merchant of Rājagaha heard: “It is said that the Order with the Awakened One at its head is invited for the morrow by the householder Anāthapiṇḍika.” Then the (great) merchant of Rājagaha spoke thus to the householder Anāthapiṇḍika: “It is said, that the Order with the Awakened One at its head is invited by you, householder, for the morrow. But you are incoming.[17] I can give you, householder, the means by which you can make a meal for the Order with the Awakened One at its head.”

“Thank you, householder, but I have the means by which I can make a meal for the Order with the Awakened One at, its head.”

BD.5.221 The urban council of Rajagana heard: “The Order with the Awakened One at its head is invited for the morrow by the householder Anāthapiṇḍika.” Then the urban council of Rājagaha spoke thus to the householder Anāthapiṇḍika: “It is said that the Order … We can give you, householder, the means by which you can make a meal for the Order with the Awakened One at its head.”

“Thank you, masters, but I have the means … at its head.”

King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha heard: “The Order …” …

“Thank you, sire, but I have the means by which I can make a meal for the Order with the Awakened One at its head.”

Kd.16.4.7 Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, having had sumptuous foods, solid and soft, prepared towards the end of that night in the dwelling of the (great) merchant of Rājagaha, Vin.2.158 had the time announced to the Lord, saying: “It is time, Lord, the meal is ready.” Then the Lord, having dressed in the morning, taking his bowl and robe, approached the dwelling of the (great) merchant of Rājagaha; having approached, he sat down on the appointed seat together with the Order of monks. Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, having with his own hand served and satisfied with sumptuous foods, solid and soft, the Order of monks with the Awakened One at its head, when the Lord had eaten and had withdrawn his hand from the bowl, sat down at a respectful distance. As he was sitting down at a respectful distance, the householder Anāthapiṇḍika spoke thus to the Lord: “Lord, may the Lord consent to a rains-residence[18] from me at Sāvatthī together with the Order of monks.”

“But, householder, Truth-finders delight in empty places.”

“It is understood, Lord, it is understood, Well-farer.” Then the Lord, having gladdened, rejoiced, roused, delighted the householder Anāthapiṇḍika with talk on dhamma, rising from his seat, departed.


Kd.16.4.8 Now at that time the householder Anāthapiṇḍika had many friends, many companions, his word carried weight.[19] Then BD.5.222 the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, having concluded that business at Rājagaha, set out for Sāvatthī. Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika enjoined people on the way, saying: “Masters, build monasteries, prepare dwelling-places, furnish gifts; an Awakened One has arisen in the world, and this Lord, invited by me, will come along by this road.”

Then these people, urged on by the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, built monasteries, prepared dwelling-places, furnished gifts. Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, having arrived at Sāvatthī, looked all round Sāvatthī, thinking:[20] “Now where could the Lord stay that would be neither too far from a village, nor too near, suitable for coming and going, accessible to people whenever they want, not crowded by day, having little noise at night, little sound, without folks’ breath, secluded from people, fitting for meditation?”

Kd.16.4.9 Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika saw Prince Jeta’s pleasure grove, neither too far from a village … fitting for meditation, and seeing it, he approached Prince Jeta; having approached he spoke thus to Prince Jeta: “Give me, young master, the pleasure grove to make a monastery.”

“The pleasure grove is not to be given away, householder, even for the price of a hundred thousand.”[21]

“Young master, the monastery is taken.”

“The monastery is not taken, householder.” They asked the chief ministers of justice,[22] saying: “Is it taken or is it not taken?” The chief ministers spoke thus: Vin.2.159 “The monastery is taken at the price fixed by you, young master.” Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, having had gold coins[23] brought out by means of wagons, had the Jeta Grove spread with the price of a hundred thousand.[24]

Kd.16.4.10 The gold coins that were taken out the first time were not enough for a small open space near to the porch. Then the BD.5.223 householder Anāthapiṇḍika enjoined the people, saying: “Go back, good people, bring (more) gold coins, I will spread this open space.” Then it occurred to Prince Jeta: “Now this can be no ordinary matter[25] inasmuch as this householder bestows so many gold coins,” and he spoke thus to the householder Anāthapiṇḍika:

“Enough, householder; let me spread this open space, give this open space to me, it will be my gift.”

Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika, thinking: “This Prince Jeta is a distinguished, well-known man; surely the faith in this dhamma and discipline of well-known men like this is very efficacious,”[26] made over that open space to Prince Jeta. Then Prince Jeta built a porch[27] on that open space. The householder Anāthapiṇḍika had dwelling-places made, he had cells[28] made … porches … attendance halls … fire halls … huts for what is allowable … privies … places for pacing up and down in … halls in the places for pacing up and down in … wells … halls at the wells … bathrooms … halls in the bathrooms … lotus ponds … he had sheds made.

Giving building work

Kd.16.5.1 Then the Lord, having stayed at Rājagaha for as long as he found suiting, set out on tour for Vesālī. In due course, walking on tour, he arrived at Vesālī. The Lord stayed there at Vesālī in the Great Grove in the Hall of the Gabled Pillars. Now at that time people were making repairs carefully and they were also attending carefully, with the requisites of robes, almsfood, lodgings and medicines for the sick, to those monks who were looking after the repairs. Then it occurred to a certain poor tailor: “Now this can be no ordinary matter inasmuch as these people are making repairs carefully. What now if I too should make repairs?” Then that poor tailor, having himself kneaded mud, having piled up bricks, had wattle and daub walls erected. But because he was not skilful the piling was crooked and a wall fell down. And a BD.5.224 second time … And a third time … a wall fell down.

Kd.16.5.2 Then that poor tailor … spread it about, saying: “These recluses, Vin.2.160 sons of the Sakyans, exhort, instruct those who give them the requisites of robes, almsfood, lodgings, medicines for the sick, and these look after their repairs. But I am poor. No one exhorts or instructs me or looks after my repairs.” Monks heard this poor tailor as he was … spreading it about. Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. Then the Lord on this occasion, in this connection, having given reasoned talk, addressed the monks, saying:

“I allow you, monks, to put repairs in charge (of a monk).[29] Monks, the monk who is in charge of repairs should make an effort,[30] thinking, ‘How can the dwelling-place be brought to a rapid termination?’ and he should restore broken and dilapidated parts.[31]

Kd.16.5.3 “And thus, monks, should they be given in charge: First, a monk should be asked; having asked him, the Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. If it seems right to the Order, let the Order give the repairs to the dwelling-place of the householder So-and-so in charge of the monk So-and-so. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The Order is giving the repairs … in charge of the monk So-and-so. If the giving in charge of the monk So-and-so, of the repairs to the dwelling-place of the householder So-and-so, is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. Repairs to the dwelling-place of the householder So-and-so are given in charge of the monk So-and-so. It is pleasing to the Order; therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this’.”

Footnotes and references:

1.

bhattāni. Cf. BD.2.149, BD.3.11 These four words are, above, all in the plural suggesting that separate portions should be got ready for each monk.

2.

sampādeti, as at Vin.3.208.

3.

uttaribhaṅga, or tit-bits, dainties. See BD.1.275, n.5.

4.

As at Vin.3.135. See BD.1.229, n.2.

5.

As at Vin.3.135. See BD.1.230, n.1.

6.

For this episode to the end of Kd.16.4.4 cf. SN.i.210.

7.

buddhagatāya satiyā.

8.

Sītavana. SN.i.211 reads Sīvathika, from the name of Sīvathika (variant reading Sivaka) of the yakkha who lived in the Sītavana.

9.

As at e.g. Vin.3.69.

10.

Cf. the first three of these lines with Vv.20.8; Vv.43.8.

11.

assatarī. Cf. vacchatarī at Kd.5.9.1, Kd.5.9.3.

12.

SN-a.i.315 says that Anāthapiṇḍika thinks that there are many other sects, those of Pūraṇa Kassapa and so on, who say they are awakened ones; but if this teacher is the awakened one he will address him by his kuladattika name, i.e. by the name given him in his family, because no one but Anāthapiṇḍika himself knows this. See also KS.i.273, n.1.

13.

yo na lippati kāmesu, as at Snp.625. Cf. Kaṭha Upaniṣad 5.11 where the Sun is not defiled or contaminated, na lipyate, by what he sees outside himself. See A.K. Coomaraswamy, A Note on the Stickfast Motif, Journal American Folklore, Vol. 57, No. 224, April–June, 1944, p.128.

14.

Cf. Snp.642.

15.

Besides SN.i.212, where the Saṃyutta version of this episode ends, this verse occurs at AN.i.138.

17.

As opposed to resident.

18.

vassāvāsa, as in Kd.3.1.1, and cf. Kd.3.14.

19.

ādeyyavāca. Vin-a.1220 says “his speech would be taken up by the many folk thinking, ‘It seems he should be heard’.”

20.

As at Kd.1.22.16, Kd.1.22.17 where Bimbisāra is giving the Bamboo Grove.

21.

As at Ja.i.94.

22.

Cf. similar passage at Vin.4.223 (BD.3.178).

23.

hirañña; see note at BD.1.28.

24.

koṭisantharaṃ santharāpesi. Vin-a.1220 says “having given a hundred thousand kahāpaṇas, having had them spread out (on the ground), having taken the measure of the circumference of trees and ponds there, he gave having had them (i.e. the kahāpaṇas) spread out in a certain place”. Most likely the gold coins were not round but square, see Vinaya Texts iii.188, n.1.

25.

na orakaṃ bhavassiti. Cf. Kd.1.9.1, and below Kd.16.5.1.

26.

As at Kd.6.36.3.

27.

koṭṭhaka is a word of unsettled meaning. Vin-a.1221 says that he built a seven storeyed long house with a porch (or storehouse) at the gateway (dvārakoṭṭhakapāsāda).

28.

Cf. this list with that at Kd.3.5.6, Kd.3.5.9.

29.

navakammaṃ dātuṃ. For various rules for making repairs see Kd.16.17.

30.

ussukkaṃ āpajjissati. Cf. ussukkaṃ karoti at Vin.4.280, Vin.4.291, Vin.4.300.

31.

At AN.iii.263 this is one of five things said to make a resident monk very useful to his residence.